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  1. #1
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    Default How to Fight Sarcopenia (Muscle Loss Due to Aging)

    How to Fight Sarcopenia (Muscle Loss Due to Aging)

    From the article

    Four Factors That Accelerate Muscle Loss


    Although aging is the most common cause of sarcopenia, other factors can also trigger an imbalance between muscle anabolism and catabolism.

    1. Immobility, Including a Sedentary Lifestyle
    2. Unbalanced Diet
    3. Inflammation
    4. Severe Stress
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
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    IMHO...being strong is not enough. To age in an ageless manner, you are well-advised to enter your fifties and sixties with as much muscle mass as possible.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  3. #3
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    Oct 2010
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    Some good things: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/art...0/#__sec8title

    Because protein ingestion is crucial for the maintenance of a variety of body functions, the requirements of protein in the elderly are a major factor in maintaining skeletal muscle mass; the amount of protein ingested that induces maximal muscle protein synthesis must be higher in elderly than in young individuals in order to combat anabolic resistance in the elderly.

    Dysregulation of autophagy contributes notably to aging. Autophagy, a lysosomal process involved in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, is inhibited by the insulin-amino acid-mTOR signaling pathway that controls both protein synthesis and longevity (see next paragraph). During aging, autophagy declines and insulin resistance can develop. Thus, autophagy can provide protection against aging and cell death. Indeed, the best way to increase autophagy in vivo is by restricting calorie intake, which may promote longevity during aging. Moreover, glutamine inhibits autophagy and regulates cell growth. The role of glutamine metabolism in autophagy is related to the activation of mTOR by leucine, which is an activator of glutaminolysis.

    Aging is also characterized by protein wasting (see next paragraph), and glutamine, which is the most abundant amino acid in the blood, may be a hallmark of catabolic states. Indeed, a low concentration of glutamine in plasma reflects reduced stores in muscle, and this reduced availability of glutamine in the catabolic state seems to correlate with increased morbidity and mortality
    I use Glutamine when on a cut diet to prevent the cannibalization of muscle during weight loss. But based on this article it can help reduce the loss of muscle due to the aging process.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
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  4. #4
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    Mar 2009
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    796
    Jonathan Sullivan talks about this and says the same things. I know Gabe knows who he is, but for anyone else he has some good videos on YouTube, look up Grey Steel.

  5. #5
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    Jun 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    IMHO...being strong is not enough. To age in an ageless manner, you are well-advised to enter your fifties and sixties with as much muscle mass as possible.
    Having lived those two decades already, I couldn't underscore enough the importance of Gabe's experience and advice on this matter. I will add that once in 5th and 6th decades, fight to keep a consistent program of weights, mobility (MA, sprints, hike), flexibility, and nutrition. After 40, life can distract you from how vital your fitness is to enjoying the more seasoned years. Yes, the mileage takes a toll, but the more fit you are, the better you will survive the inevitable big and small assualts and repairs you may encounter.

    Get after it!
    Greek
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor

    2019 Classes:
    CRG-1, Pistol Gunfighting, August 24-25, 2019 Olympia, WA


    From Murphy: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GTFOTX!!)


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    838
    Great tips and very timely for me, at 54.

    Personally, with kids grown and on their own, the time to workout has become easier and I am better shape now than in my 40's. I have been working with a trainer 2 days a week religiously for several years and doing 2-3 days a week of lifting, cycling, hiking, climbing or martial arts to keep active.

    Joint injuries seem to be the most common limiting factor I see among fellow half-century athletes (had my rotator cuff surgery last year but back to pre-surgery pull-up numbers again now a year later). Strength training and HIIT are keys for me . Keeping body fat in check has been much more important and building muscle is a great way to do just that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    439
    Another great source for learning about how to combat sarcopenia is Strongpath, founded by Fred Bartlit. Barlit served as an Army Ranger for 8 years after graduating from West Point and then became one of the top trial lawyers in the country. He represented George W. Bush in his battle against Al Gore in the Florida recount. He is now 86 years old and lifts weights every day. “The minimum amount of exercise you should do is three days a week, an hour a day. The more you do the better it works,” Fred explained. (If this post is improper please feel free to delete it.)

    https://strongpath.com/
    Last edited by Chicago; 03-14-2019 at 01:40 PM.

  8. #8
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    Mar 2014
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    Kansas City, MO
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    Having just entered my sixth decade, I have to say that I've had PR's on several lifts, and actually seen muscle growth, something I wouldn't have expected.

    It's not over until you say it is..

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