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Thread: MDR?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
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    44,871
    If anyone wants an MDR...you will have a chance to support the forum by getting one here. 10% over cost.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Southeast Florida
    Posts
    1,756
    I've followed the MDR since it was announced. It interested me for multiple reasons, and although there are two new competitors on the market since then in the .308 bullpup space (the K&M M17S (a modern update to the old Bushmaster design) and Tavor 7) I think the MDR is still attractive. One of the things I really like about it is how their fore end setup compares to the others. They give you the closest thing to a typical AR, so how you hold it, mounting accessories, etc. is going to be very similar to an AR. And they made it modular so you can swap out different lengths/thickness, there is an aftermarket aluminum option coming, etc. The vertical thickness and lack of rail space really irritates me with the Tavor. The MDR also seems to have the potential for very good accuracy based on user reports I've seen. Initial reports with the Tavor indicate it's not quite as good.

    The rollout was pretty rocky, with a lot of delays, there were definitely some teething issues they didn't catch in R&D, and there were some pretty frustrated early buyers. The CEO ate some humble pie, and they seem to be making a very serious effort to remedy the situation. There are several upgrades that were offered free to all previous purchasers, including improving the extractor and gas system. All indications I've seen say that these have significantly improved the reliability issues.

    Personally, I think the forward ejection and ambidextrous features are cool, and the design is impressive, but for many it may keep the gun limited to the play and hunt categories. I've encouraged the CEO to consider offering the option for a simpler more traditional ejection system--who knows what they will do, as they are committed to not announcing anything in the future until it's ready. But I think that's the primary weak spot many here would not like--it just looks complicated and seems like it has too much potential for failure, and the clearing/diagnosing of malfunctions is not what we would want to deal with in a firefight. You can't see the chamber, you'd have to remove the cover to even see what's going on with a malfunction, etc.

    But I do think that it has the potential to be much better than previous bullpup options. I'd love to take Gabe up on his offer, but unfortunately I'm not there yet. But if you like the idea of knocking about 10" off the length of an AR-10 without changing the barrel length, you care about accuracy, you like the idea of modularity (easy barrel removal, easy break down, etc.) then it's worth checking out. They are definitely trying hard to build something new and better.
    Last edited by mike135; 09-29-2019 at 07:19 PM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    15
    I bought one in June in .308. Took it to Gunsite for a five-day “Battle Rifle” class and it ran without a hiccup through over 1100 rounds. Light in weight for a .308 and very smooth action overall. The heavy trigger pull is it’s weak point but third-party upgrades are coming soon. It will have to be sent back to Desert Tech for upgrades which I have been hesitant to do considering the company’s problems with meeting promised delivery dates. The 5.56 conversion kit is sold out, at least for now.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    14
    SLF,

    My MDR has been back to DT multiple times, never a problem sending it back and the turn around time. I wouldn't worry about it, they have been good.

    It's good to hear that you've shot it as much as you have. I'd guess that mine is at the same level of updates as yours and it now seems to be running well but nowhere near your round count. Still a lot more testing to work through.

    I expect to spend a lot of time talking to them at SHOT. Hopefully they'll have good answers.

    Jim

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    17
    Good friend of mine used his MDR in .223 with a special forend, suppressor and an Elcan on top during a class last week. Lots of rain. It handled flawless.

    I wouldn't get mine as I'm not into exotic rifles and prefer more common ones. But he really liked his and it did just fine on distances out to 500m.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Southeast Florida
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by Kampfhamster View Post
    Good friend of mine used his MDR in .223 with a special forend, suppressor and an Elcan on top during a class last week. Lots of rain. It handled flawless.

    I wouldn't get mine as I'm not into exotic rifles and prefer more common ones. But he really liked his and it did just fine on distances out to 500m.
    It's interesting to see how they chose to start with .308 (less competition, made it more unique) but ended up having a lot more hiccups in the development and roll out than they probably would have had if they had started with .223. .308 seems to be much more finicky with gas regulation and extraction and that was where they had so much trouble with reliability initially.

    I know modularity is the focus of most new weapon development right now, and the ability to easily switch between .308 (and associated calibers) and .223 (and associated calibers) is certainly unique but I wonder how many people will actually end up taking advantage of the ability to do it. I suspect for most people it will be more of a novelty than something useful.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    17
    Absolutely agree. He's a degree in engineering, so he got it because of technical interest.

    For the rest of the class the thing was sometimes a pain in the ass. While it worked fine for him, noone else had ever seen one before and didn't even knew hot to check that it was not loaded.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    14
    The only reasonably effective way to check for "empty" that I've found is with the mag out, bolt back and inserting a thumb up the mag well and to the chamber/locking lugs but after all of that the "thumb" check seems redundant. Just hope you don't hit the bolt release during the check, would be real uncomfortable. Don't think that there's a good way to use a chamber flag if required on a range.

    The ejection port mostly fails as a viewport into the chamber, it's a very small window. You'll be lucky to get a glint of brass through the port, a quick glance won't do it. At night you'll need a flashlight.

    Jim

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Southeast Florida
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim1855 View Post
    The only reasonably effective way to check for "empty" that I've found is with the mag out, bolt back and inserting a thumb up the mag well and to the chamber/locking lugs but after all of that the "thumb" check seems redundant. Just hope you don't hit the bolt release during the check, would be real uncomfortable. Don't think that there's a good way to use a chamber flag if required on a range.

    The ejection port mostly fails as a viewport into the chamber, it's a very small window. You'll be lucky to get a glint of brass through the port, a quick glance won't do it. At night you'll need a flashlight.

    Jim
    I've seen people remove the ejection port cover with their fingers--do you find that's easy to do, or do you need some kind of tool?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    14
    I suppose some might be able to remove the covers using hands only, I cannot. But it's easy to do with a cartridge base pushing the slide catch forward and lifting at the same time.

    W/O the cover you have more access both visually and physically and can both feel and see a cartridge during a "press check". The gun will run and eject W/O the port cover but the other side pusher ejector cover needs to be on as this is what kicks the spent case out.

    Jim

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