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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    middle of nowhere virginia
    Posts
    294

    Default NPE carry advice

    Hey guys, so i got a new job. Yay me no more stop and rob. I'll be working in a fairly nice call center. Corporate america. Now the good points are a SUPER relaxed dress code, like t-shirt and jeans and good benefits/commission/pay. Had to join a union though. The negatives are they have a very plainly posted no weapons policy. While no one's said shit about my pocket clip knife or light, not that i think they've noticed. I think if i had a gun print or become visible it might become a little different. Appendix sucks for me (trying to get into better shape here but not quite there yet). I'm thinking pocket or possibly ankle just for maximum not be seen factor and maybe leave a full size in the car in lock box because if they don't see it they can't bitch bout it. Advice?
    "It's not that life is too short, it's that death is so damn long." unknown
    "People s
    hould not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people" V
    "
    I must study politics and war, that my sons may have the liberty to study mathematics and philosophy, natural history and naval architecture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, tapestry, and porcelain." John Adams

  2. #2
    Make sure the lockbox is well out of sight, even to someone in the passenger seat, or the back seats.

    I'd lose the pocket clip myself. As you correctly observe, most people have no idea what they are, but it only takes one.

    Make sure to get a copy of the employee handbook and know exactly what the rules are.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,504
    I would not use ankle in an office environment where you’re sitting all the time.

    IMO appendix is ideal concealment, ESPECIALLY when seated at a desk. Also, any demanding job is going to impact your awareness, and in this case your awareness of how well you’re concealing. You must ensure it’s covered at all times, and that’s easy to screw up on your hip throughout the day. Call centers deal with demanding people. Getting up and using the can. Co workers around and behind you constantly. Your concealment game needs to be ON POINT.

    Not trying to discourage, just saying you have some work to do.

    Work on it until AIWB is doable for you. Review your equipment needs...there are times where a small single stack gun just makes more sense. It’s a compromise vs a G19 but...a G43 is better than nothing.

    A piece in the car, locked and well concealed, is fine but it doesn’t do much good when you need it inside.

    Until you feel really good about your concealment, you should focus on other items.

    I carry a knife and I am not supposed to. I don’t worry about it. We even have security around. No one has hasseled me. But I may put it totally in the pocket if I meet with someone who I don’t know.

    A knife that doesn’t look like satan’s shiv is also a good idea.

    I carry a Heretic, cut for my pocket. It’s just a bottle opener after all.

    Capabilty with shit just laying around is something to be aware of as well. The mindset must be that you can kill anyone with office supplies if necessary. Sounds silly but...

    I would foucs on fitness. Work towards AIWB, go to a single stack if necessary. Simultaneously, focus on the right non ballistic tools.

    Briefcase carry is is problematic but can be done. I wouldn’t recommend for everyone, especially in a new job.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    I would not use ankle in an office environment where you’re sitting all the time.
    Brent, why do you advise not using ankle for an office setting?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    SE Louisiana
    Posts
    214
    You also need to be aware of the bathroom facility's layout. Chances are very high that you will need to sit on the throne at work and that requires some forethought...
    - How will you deal with your weapon with your pants down? Removing it to rest it on the toilet or TP rack is a recipe for disaster.
    - What kind of door is on the stall and where are the mirrors? A door that stops shy of the floor combined with sinks opposite said door means that anyone washing up can see your dropped pants and any holster/mags that are attached.
    These issues can be resolved with practice at home but it's a real issue that very few people talk about.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    3,166
    Quote Originally Posted by jgencinc View Post
    Brent, why do you advise not using ankle for an office setting?
    Brent, if I may:

    I wore an ankle rig for years in an NPE and got it away with it, but:

    1. Ankle holsters print. The pants leg rides up. The sock stretched over the piece looks thicker, like an ankle sprain. All it takes is once.
    2. Keep your hardware off your back and sides. A pat on the back can out you. If you have to, go with a larger waist in the trousers and a belly band. But check to see if the weapon prints through the trouser material. So spare ammo in a pouch at 11:00 with a small, flat semi at 1:00 works best. You want to look smooth and symmetrical, maybe a little heavier than you are.

    It'll be our little secret.

    For a number of reasons I dislike belly bands, but I have used them extensively. They work well for some.

    Also: keep your mitt, elbows and whatnot away from the gun. A man adjusting a holster looks like a man adjusting a holster.
    Using the head requires some ingenuity, and an ankle rig is hard to conceal from the stall next to you. At the risk of sounding crude, crap at home.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    1, 1, 14. And a wakeup.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    17
    https://www.kangaroocarry.com

    Better than nothing.....especially with a light, thin gun.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Made it to Free America
    Posts
    13,286
    This is the place for mini and micro guns, think G43 at the largest (a G42 is better) down to Seecamp and maybe even the NAA revolver. Here pocket carry for the micros (Seecamp / NAA) is your friend. The G43 will require a belt holster or a Bellyband. I like Smartcarry for what youre talking about. I do like ankle holsters, BUT you do have to choose pants that "fit" the ankle holster. If the holster is black then start wearing black socks.

    Just because youre surrounded by guys who dress like slobs, doesn't mean you have to look like a slob too. Move slowly, switch from jeans to slacks, (even Sears work pants are a better choice). Switch from Tee shirts to collared polos and button down shirts. AGAIN move slowly, during the process wear cover garments like hoodies and as you progress try "dress" (suit) vests even over Tee shirts.

    Neck knives are an option too and don't forget your Titanium chop stix...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,504
    Quote Originally Posted by jgencinc View Post
    Brent, why do you advise not using ankle for an office setting?
    Papa covered it perfectly.

    Ankle holsters work great in some situations. Standing, great. Seated in a car, great. Behind a big oak desk, great. But in a modern office setting where desks are open, where you sit all day in close proximity to many others...Might as well be open carry.

    When that pant leg rides up, you have to make sure EVERY TIME you get up that it’s covering your rig. And people will see. Sooner or later you’ll forget to fix it and you’ll be walking around with it out in the open.

    As Papa said, only takes once.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    6,991
    You're getting great pointers here. I'll piggyback off a few of the ideas already mentioned and add my own twist.

    Office items. You are likely already surrounded by things that could be used as a weapon. Look around and see what's already there. If it is possible for you to add things to your work area, you can do so with weaponry in mind--perhaps without even reaching into your own pocket. When setting up one office, I was directed to a cabinet full of spare and cast-off office supplies--hole punch, staplers, pen cups, etc.--and one item I picked up from there was an overly large letter opener that I set up on the back edge of my keyboard.

    Staged weapons. The full extent of my staged weapons might border on ludicrous. Dwight Schrute would find it reasonable. In the era of omnipresent office cameras, you might not want to stage actual weapons, and almost certainly not guns. But if you cut a 26-28" length of 3/4" or 1" dowel rod, and prop it up behind a desk, (a) no one will notice it, and (b) even if they do, they'll just wonder what it is and why it's there. You can stage dowel rods (escrima sticks) all over an office for about $5.

    Guns. The office environment invites some compromise, and you are unlikely to have a 100y shot, but I still don't like going too small. I can accept a moderate loss of energy (smaller caliber) and a significant reduction in capacity, but I'm less willing to sacrifice accuracy. While the office environment is unlikely to present a really long shot, the likely scenarios are also not 1y shots. The scenarios that would actually warrant a gun would be a disgruntled employee showing up with a shotgun or a spouse showing up with violence planned. Those scenarios do require a shot across the room, not merely jamming a gun into somebody's belly. The two guns I would put at the top of the list would be the G43 and the S&W 642. The decision between them might come down to holsters.

    Holsters. The 642 rides comfortably in a pants pocket. Spare ammo is easy to carry on a speed strip, but slow to load. The G43 works well at appendix, or perhaps in a SmartCarry.

    Clothing. While you may be allowed to wear just T-shirts, they are not great at concealment. Consider button-down shirts, untucked, with some kind of pattern. Dark colors are usually better.

    Bag carry. Everyone here will moan at the mention of bag carry, and for good reason. But it is an option when other things are not. Picking the right bag becomes essential. It must not look "tacticool." It must position the gun in a safe and consistent position, and do so in a non-obvious way. Ideally, you should be able to ask someone to retrieve something from your bag (a pen, book, whatever) and them not notice that there is a gun inside. A bag is also a great place to stick a TQ, some paracord, duct tape, multitool, and other little things. If possible, store a gun in a bag in a holster that can also be used on your body.

    Have a ditch plan. Envision this scenario: your boss's boss comes by and asks, "Hey, Joe, can you come help us move some boxes and furniture around? It's hot in the warehouse. You may want to take off your shirt." The perfect EDC shirt and AIWB holster have just come up short. So you look around frantically for a place to stash the gun until your moving adventure is over. Go ahead and preplan this, picking out a few places where you could very temporarily ditch a gun and come back to it. You might lift up the liner of a trash bin and put the pistol in the bottom. You might unlock the paper towel dispenser and place your gun on top. Have options.

    Last, accept that there are some scenarios where you won't be able to make it work. Weigh the risks. Make the call.
    Virtute et Armis

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