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  1. #31
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    For those not tracking the Jim Riley reference.....


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunfight_at_Hide_Park

    Gunfight at Hide Park

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Jump to navigationJump to searchThe Gunfight at Hide Park, or Newton Massacre, was the name given to an Old West gunfight that occurred on August 19, 1871, in Newton, Kansas, United States. It was well publicised at the time, but since has received little historical attention, despite its producing a higher body count than the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and the Four Dead in Five Seconds Gunfight of 1881.
    Unlike most other well-known gunfights of the Old West, it involved no notable or well known gunfighters, nor did it propel any of its participants into any degree of fame. Its legend has grown, however, because one of the participants simply walked away from the scene, never to be seen again.
    The gunfight[edit]

    The incident began with an argument between two local lawmen, Billy Bailey and Mike McCluskie. The two men began arguing on August 11, 1871, over local politics on election day in the "Red Front Saloon", located in downtown Newton. The argument developed into a fist fight, with Bailey being knocked outside the saloon and into the street. McCluskie followed, drawing his pistol. He fired two shots at Bailey, hitting him with the second shot in the chest. Bailey died the next day, on August 12, 1871. McCluskie fled town to avoid arrest, but was only away for a few days before returning, after receiving information that the shooting would most likely be deemed self defense, despite the fact that Bailey never produced a weapon. McCluskie had claimed he feared for his life, having known that in three previous gunfights, Bailey had killed two men.
    Bailey, a native of Texas, had several cowboy friends who were in town. Upon hearing of his death, they vowed revenge against McCluskie. On August 19, 1871, McCluskie entered Newton and went to gamble at "Tuttles Dance Hall", located in an area of town called Hide Park. He was accompanied by a friend, Jim Martin. As McCluskie settled into gambling, three cowboys entered the saloon. They were Billy Garrett, Henry Kearnes, and Jim Wilkerson, all friends to Bailey. Billy Garrett had been in at least two prior gunfights, killing two men.
    Hugh Anderson, the son of a wealthy Bell County, Texas cattle rancher, also entered, and approached McCluskie, calling him a coward and threatening his life. Jim Martin jumped up and attempted to stop a fight from occurring.
    Anderson shot McCluskie in the neck, knocking him to the floor. McCluskie attempted to shoot Anderson, but his pistol misfired. Anderson then stood over him and shot him several times in the back.
    Kearns, Garrett, and Wilkerson also began firing, perhaps to keep the crowd back, and may have shot McCluskie in the leg. At that point a young man, believed to have been around 18 years of age at the time, named James Riley, opened fire on them.
    Riley was dying from tuberculosis, and had been taken in by McCluskie shortly after arriving in Newton. Riley had never been involved in a gunfight before, but only Anderson still had a loaded pistol to return fire. Some accounts say Riley locked the saloon doors before shooting, but this seems unlikely. The room was filled with smoke from all the prior gunfire, and visibility was bad. Riley ended up hitting seven men.
    Jim Martin, the would-be peacemaker, was shot in the neck and later died of his wound. Garrett, Kearns, and a bystander named Patrick Lee were also mortally wounded. Anderson, Wilkerson, and another bystander were wounded but survived.
    With both guns empty and all his opponents down, Riley walked away and was never seen again. Legend has it he left the area and began a new life elsewhere. However, due to his ill physical state, it is more likely he died not long afterward under an assumed name. Either way, he disappeared.
    A warrant was issued for Anderson for killing McCluskie. He left Kansas by train and settled in Texas to recover from his wounds.
    On July 4, 1873, McCluskie's brother, Arthur McCluskie, located Anderson. A brutal fight ensued with both men shooting each other several times, then going after each other with knives. Neither survived.


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  2. #32
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    http://hchm.org/fact-fiction/

    A Boy Named Riley: Newton’s Bloody Sunday, Part 3

    Posted on August 29, 2014 by hchm-curator
    by Kristine Schmucker, HCHM Curator
    History is full of unanswered questions, strange events and mysteries. One in Harvey County is the identity of the second shooter on August 20, 1871.
    A sensational event in 1871, the community and state were shocked with the level of violence. Perhaps, one of the most notorious gunfights, killing more than at Dodge, yet no one ever claimed credit.
    Did the shooter simply walk out the door and into history?
    Did he go, change his identity, and live as a law abiding person?
    Or did he become a notorious outlaw, but deny this crime? The very mystery has allowed for facts to become obscure and legends to grow.
    The area newspapers reported the evening’s gruesome events with relish, but a name is not given to the shooter until later accounts other than “Nemesis” in the article by “Allegro.” Judge RWP Muse was in Newton during the shooting and was the first local person to provide the name “Riley” for the shooter in the 1882 “History of Harvey County”. Judge Muse described the shooter;
    a friend of McCloskey, a boy named Riley, some 18 years of age, quiet and inoffensive in deportment, and evidently dying from consumption . . .”
    According to Muse, the young man was known around Newton as “McCluskie’s Shadow.” He was a “thin, tubercular man who followed the railroad gunman around like a little dog that barked and snapped from behind his master.
    Muse theorizes that after witnessing his friend’s death, Riley “coolly locked the door, thus preventing egress, and drawing his revolver, discharged every chamber.” He shot a total of seven men, then, his gun empty, he walked out of the dance hall and is never heard from again. (***see note below)
    The first retelling of the events of August 20, other than newspaper reports, took the form of poetry. Theodore F. Price, Dramatic Impersonator, published “Songs of the Southwest” first in 1872 and ten years later a slightly different version. One section of the lengthy poem was entitled “Newton: A Tale of the Southwest.


    The poem identifies the shooter as “Riley.” Price may have gotten this information from Judge Muse, the only other first hand account to use the name.
    “What form strides o’er the threshold red
    With weapon fiercely clenched?
    He looks upon McClusky dead
    With gory garments drenched; Then calmly aimed-the trigger drew-
    A Texan died-his aim was true. . . .
    Seven gory forms before him lying! That friend was fearfully avenged
    Grim Riley turned away.”
    Illustration by Brad Sneed

    Over the years exaggerations and errors occurred. In a 1926 article an early settler described the “Newton Massacre” for the Newton Evening Kansan Republican. John L. Wilson recalled that
    the town supported a dance hall at the edge of town. This place was operated by one who went by the name of Rody Joe. The numerous Texas cowboys engaged on the ranches in this section rallied at that favorite resort. One specific instance was pointed out when a man by the name of McClucky invaded the dance hall and shot to death nine Texas cowboys as a result of divided opinions.”
    There are several incorrect statements in the Wilson account that only add to the misconceptions and misinformation. Rowdy Joe was a dance hall owner in Newton for a short time before moving to Wichita. In 1871, he was involved in a fatal Newton gunfight with a man named Sweet. By 1873 he was again in the news after a duel with another Wichita saloon owner E.T. “Red” Beard, which was fatal for Beard. Although clearly a violent man, Rowdy Joe was not involved in the shootings on Aug 20. None of the early accounts have McCluskie or McClucky “invading the dance hall.”
    The Newton Evening Kansan Republican tried to answer the question of what happened to Riley in a brief article on 4 May 1951 quoting a “prominent citizen of Newton . . .he revealed the story of ‘what became of Riley?’.”
    “Law abiding men knew what had taken place [in Tuttle’s Saloon]. They furnished the youth [Riley] with saddle and bridle, a livery stable owner gave him a pony and he rode of town that night and wound up in Ellsworth. . . .Nothing more is heard of him, and it is presumed that his pulmonary disease ended his life.”
    Author William Moran noted in Santa Fe and the Chisholm Trail in Newton (1971) that at the time of the shoot out there were several newspaper correspondents in town. Certainly, if Riley could have been found they would have had motivation. Moran theorized that Riley left on the early Sunday morning train, possibly hiding at the east end train yards until the train left. A stow-a-way in the baggage car would not have been noticed. Moran concluded, “Riley could have gone to either Emporia or Topeka, and there taken up where he left off at Newton, that of doing odd jobs under an assumed name.
    Mari Sandoz wrote in 1978, “then as suddenly as he started the slaughter, the youth with the deadly aim cooly stepped out in to the night”. A posse was organized to search for Riley, but he was never seen again in Newton. Some rumors had him “GN” or Gone North; others maintain that he died soon after.
    One intriguing theory by cowboy poet Neal Torrey, follows Riley to Nebraska and the Dakotas where he reinvented himself as the famous outlaw “Doc” Middleton. Middleton was a slim blond man of quiet nature who had as one of his many aliases “Jim Riley”.


    To answer the question of who was Riley, Kansas historians, Snell and Wilson concluded in an 1968 article for the Kansas Historical Quarterly that “later historians have assigned the given name of James to Riley, but confirming contemporary evidence cannot be found.
    Perhaps a reporter for the Wichita Eagle said it best in an 1957 retelling of the story:
    “the final, and perhaps most interesting part of the whole story is, of course, the part played by the unknown youth Riley. He came from oblivion and disappeared into nowhere, but he left his mark on one incident-and on more than one man-in the history of the West.”

    One thing is certain, the 1871 season in Newton was lawless and dangerous. McCoy wrote of the 1871 season in Newton:
    “A moderate business only was done at Newton, which gained a national reputation for its disorder and blood-shed. As many as eleven persons were shot down on a single evening and many graves were filled with subjects who had “died with their boots on.”
    Judge Muse put the number of violent deaths at 12. Later historians, like Drago, state a closer estimate of “sudden death” for Newton during the cattle town years would be 25 – not 50 that some claim. Today, most historians estimate the number dying a “sudden death” during Newton’s cowtown years at 25.
    Newton’s General Massacre continues to interest people.
    Louis L’Amour used the events of 20 August 1871 in the 1960 novel Flint. The events described in “Crossing” shoot out in the opening chapter is loosely based on the Newton events.
    “Legend was born that night in Kansas, and the story of the massacre at the Crossing was told and retold over many a campfire. Of the survivors, neither would talk, but one of the dying men had whispered, “Flint!” It was rumored that Flint was the name of an almost legendary killer who was occasionally hired by big cattle outfits or railroad companies.”

    Numerous articles have been written in journals and magazines retelling the story. The facts remain the same. Five men died and three were wounded in Perry Tuttle’s Saloon in the early morning hours of 20 August 1871. One was shot by Hugh Anderson and four by a shooter known as Riley. Following the shoot out, Anderson is transported to Kansas City to recover from his wounds and the second shooter, Riley, disappears.
    Sources

    • Kansas Daily Commonwealth (Topeka) August 22, 23, & 27, 1871. Recount events of August 1871.
    • Abilene Chronicle August 24, 1871. Recount events of August 1871.
    • Emporia (Kansas) News August 25, 1871. Recount events of August 1871.
    • Newton Evening Kansan Republican. 20 August, 1921; 24 August 1921; 25 August 1921 ; 27 August 1921; 29 August 1921; 30 August 1921; 2 September 1921. 4 May 1951. Microfilm available at the Harvey County Historical Museum & Archives.
    • Muse, Judge R.W.P.. A History of Harvey County: 1871-1881. 1882 Harvey County Atlas, reprinted by the Harvey County Historical Museum & Archives. ***Note on Muse’s account: Muse described Riley calmly locked the saloon door, but then Jim Martin could not have left the building. This also relies on the assumptions that a key was in the door and a young man, reportedly not a gunfighter, would have the presence of mind to coolly lock a door. The earliest descriptions of the event hardly give the picture of an accomplished gunman, rather of someone blindly shooting into a dark, smoky room.
    • Price, Theodore F. Songs of the Southwest Topeka, Ks: Common-wealth Printing Co, 1872 and 1881.
    • Prentis, Noble L. South-western Letters, 1882.
    • McCoy, Joseph G. Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade of the West and Southwest (1874 reprint 1966, on line www.kancoll.org/books/mccoy.htm
    • Stewart, C.H. “Newton History” personal recollections written 25 February 1938. (60 years ago-1878) Chisholm Trail Collection, Harvey County Historical Museum & Archives.
    • Wilson, John L. Newton Evening Kansan Republican 25 January 1926

    .Secondary and On-Line Sources

    • Chinn, Stephen. Kansas Gunfighters s.v. http://www.vlib.us/old_west/guns.html.
    • Smith, Mark. Gunfight at Hide Park—Newton, Kansas Newton’s General Massacre 19 August 1871 http://www.kansasheritage.org/gunfighters/hidepark.html (accessed October 25, 2007)
    • Drago, Harry Sinclair. Wild, Woolly & Wicked: The History of the Kansas Cow Town and the Texas Cattle Trade. New York: Clarkson N. Potter, Inc., 1960.
    • Drago, Harry Sinclair. Legend Makers: Tales of the Old-Time Peace Officers and Desperadoes of the Frontier New York: Dodd, Mead & Co., 1975.
    • Hutton, Harold. The Luckiest Outlaw: The Life and Legends of Doc Middleton. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1974. Bison Ed. 1992.
    • Miller, Nyle H. & Joseph W. Snell. Why the West was Wild: A Contemporary Look at the Antics of Some Highly Publicized Kansas Cowtown Personalities. Topeka, Ks: Kansas State Historical Society, 1963.
    • Moran, William T. Santa Fe and the Chisholm Trail at Newton. ca. 1971 privately printed, Harvey County Historical Museum & Archives.
    • Richmond, Robert W. “Early Newton Scene of Bloody Massacre” Wichita Eagle 1957. Harvey County Historical Museum & Archives Historical Files,.
    • Rosa, Joseph G. The Gunfighter: Man or Myth? Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1969.
    • Sandoz, Mari. The Cattlemen. University of Nebraska, 1978.
    • Waltner, John D. The Process of Civilization on the Kansas Frontier, Newton, Kansas, 1871-1873 Masters Thesis, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Ks, 1971.

    Articles:

    • Dary, David. True Tales of the Old-Time Plains New York: Crown Publishers, 1979.
    • Prowse, Brad. “The General Massacre” American Cowboy July/August 1998.
    • Sullens, Joe. “Newton, Kansas: the Town the Old West Forgot” True West May 1984.
    • Smith, Robert Barr. “Bad Night in Newton” Wild West April 1995.

    Fiction & Poetry



    This entry was tagged Hide Park, Jim Riley, Judge RWP Muse, Newton General Massacre, Riley. Bookmark the permalink.
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  3. #33
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    Just ran across a couple pictures of the dead bad guys. All of them appear to have been shot in the head.
    Just figured that was a point some here would like to know.
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit." -Aristotle

  4. #34
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    Perhaps theres a compromise here, how'bout if you use that fancy cellphone which shows exactly where you've been for the last hour and call your attorney (AND 911 to say who and where you are waiting) after you holster and before you end up face down with your arms spread out like "Jesus on the Cross".... Then when they find you calmly sipping a coffee from the now abandoned Starbucks, you can say, "Hi guys, we need to talk, and by the way, my attorney is enroute. Please tell the white shirts out there to let him in. Now lets talk cuz No Shit there I was....." Oh and since all the officers will have body cams, it would be a nice touch to get on video you leaving money for the coffee and Danish you took from Starbucks.

    A response like that has the merit of cooperation and some legal protection. It says Im willing to tell you what the F happened; but I want my counsel present. It says Im not an asshole; but I know someone will be wanting to burn somebody and I don't want it to be me.

    Gabe et'al is correct there will be calls to 911 describing a shooter who looks like you, and having found you at the scene and with a fired gun and empty mags, (and maybe a suppressor) (and maybe a gun with a psycho looking brace on it), they (whoever they are) will be hard pressed not to toss a round in your direction out of bad intel, poor training in real world incidents, and just plain fear.

    You have to control the conversation, maybe that means you have to keep talking, and talking to them like you are the reluctant hero, maybe it means you need to pause when you need a drink, maybe it means you need to flirt with the female officer or ask one of the other officers if shes single when she leaves the room. Hell maybe it means you need a piss break and ask to call your wife. It does not mean being confrontational or just as bad refusing to talk without your attorney. It does mean saying "Id like another Starbucks coffee, how'bout you guys?" Id start by seeing how they react to you not sitting in the uncomfortable chair and instead sitting on the corner of the desk and walking towards the door, maybe peeking out to see if your wife is waiting. If theyre good the door will be at least partially open, so they can say and show on the video that you really could leave.

    Personally I like using humor, even humor at your expense, "Hey if I had known this was gonna happen, Id have dressed better" and "My mom always told me to wear clean underwear, now I know why". Act like you've done nothing wrong, because you haven't.

    ….but what do I know

  5. #35
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    Instead of all of this contrived stuff I'd I would likely be trying to help whomever I could assuming all the bad guys are dead and more good guys haven't shown up. I would be the first good guy there waiting for more good guys. I don't understand this sudden fear when there are tons and tons of events showing that killing the terrorist/active shooter isn't a problem.
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  6. #36
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    I worry that I've overcomplicated the scenario by adding the element of escape. It's really not that big a deal. My default response after any shooting is to run. That's my program. Once you've run, you have the option of picking up the phone and calling whomever. If you stick around then (a) you are not out of the danger zone, and (b) explaining yourself is no longer optional; it's required. For me, working my way through this scenario and adapting it to my own situation, I was able to conclude simply that my preprogrammed default response still works. I do not need to make any adjustment.

    I also concede that the odds of slipping out like a ghost is highly unlikely. (Though perhaps not quite as unlikely as actually being lucky enough to be in this position in the first place.) My response remains the same. I would not alter the plan that I laid out above. But I think most people would get more out of this exercise by ignoring that part of my post. Forget about running. Assume that you'll holster up, say hello when the cops come charging in, and just get swept to the ground. The more important part of this mental exercise is planning for what you would do during the shooting, not after.

    My opinion on the proper conduct during the fight is that the best approach is that of a hunter. But not a sit-in-a-tree-and-wait-for-the-deer hunter. This is like speed stalking and the game can shoot back. So you have to move quickly but safely; constantly be scanning ahead for both targets and cover; engage targets instantly when they appear (in this way, it is somewhat like an IPSC/IDPA match); and remain invisible to the force you are hunting. Even when the gunshots cease, the screams will continue. You will have to analyze the screams to determine whether they are just hysterical women or whether there is still a threat out there somewhere. The concepts of CQB translate very well, despite it being a relatively open area. The same rules will apply (don't move past a room that you have not cleared) and the same rules will be broken (you will occasionally move past a room that you have not cleared). Just like CQB, it would be a whole lot better with a couple of friends, but when you have to do it alone, well....you have to do it alone.

    I know that one of the weakest parts of my game is my virtual inability to play the role of victim. I know the importance of looking all shaken up and squeezing out a tear, but it's just not me. It requires a significant amount of emotional energy, and emotion is something that I'm short on. One thing that I would do differently in this case--simply because I could--is that I would not even attempt to play the role of beaten-up Clark Kent. At the point that I'm talking to the cops, whether it is at the scene, at the station, or in my attorney's office, it would be a cold, calculated debrief and I wouldn't be hiding my arrogance.
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorkface View Post
    Instead of all of this contrived stuff I'd I would likely be trying to help whomever I could assuming all the bad guys are dead and more good guys haven't shown up. I would be the first good guy there waiting for more good guys. I don't understand this sudden fear when there are tons and tons of events showing that killing the terrorist/active shooter isn't a problem.
    You do realize the guy you're referring to with the "sudden fear" is an experienced defense attorney, right?

    Maybe you just haven't heard enough horror stories about "good guys" getting screwed by the system and politics and people in LE with conflicting agendas and the media with their own agendas.

    Then we can talk about what happens when the Twitter mob doxxes you, and not only you but your family, your extended family, your friends, etc. And then what happens when the friends of the guys you shot start making direct and legitimate threats against you? You may say "bring it on!", but what about your wife and children when you're not around? What about your extended family?

    That SAS guy has already been transported out of the country due to fears for his personal safety because of all the un-redacted pictures of him from this incident on the Internet. Is the government going to relocate you and your entire family and put you in WitPro and get you a new job because of threats against you?

    So yeah, as much as I love the idea of being a hero and killing bad guys, I'm not so sure I want to be hanging around the scene, talking to media, etc. in 2019. I don't call that fear, I call that prudence.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by callmebubba View Post
    Just ran across a couple pictures of the dead bad guys. All of them appear to have been shot in the head.
    Just figured that was a point some here would like to know.

    Beautiful poetic justice....
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    Has anyone said how the SAS guy just happened to be in Kenya? Or how he just happened to have all his gear including loaded weapons handy in his POV, while in a foreign nation? Oh and how do we know hes SAS and now that hes been ID'd as SAS that travels with weapons and gear to foreign nations whats his military future and what are the political implications of foreign soldiers operating in sovereign nations?

    What am I missing? Im not saying I wouldn't be glad if he did the same things here; but Id be asking the same questions.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDELWEISS View Post
    Has anyone said how the SAS guy just happened to be in Kenya? Or how he just happened to have all his gear including loaded weapons handy in his POV, while in a foreign nation? Oh and how do we know hes SAS and now that hes been ID'd as SAS that travels with weapons and gear to foreign nations whats his military future and what are the political implications of foreign soldiers operating in sovereign nations?

    What am I missing? Im not saying I wouldn't be glad if he did the same things here; but Id be asking the same questions.
    The Facebook page OAF Nation had a short video that gave vague details of what they’re hearing, but there are several different things reported. All have him there on official, armed, business working with the police. Why he was on the scene isn’t known. He is remaining anonymous and getting an award.
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