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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,215
    mine

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OTDP View Post
    I think it's limited.
    I think the principle is important. Specific techniques flow from that, whether within arm’s reach or outside it.

    Karate, wrestling, boxing, fencing...they all have the characteristic that your technique interacts with the opponent's technique. Punch and block, parry and riposte, feint and attack.
    More limited outside arms reach, maybe...though I’d say the very idea of concealment is in line with the principle. But specifically, many confrontations are within arm’s reach. 0-5’ touches in this and and pistol ground fighting goes a bit deeper. I will have to write up some specifics.

    Shooting, archery, throwing stones...they do not directly interact with the opponent's technique. Deception is limited to concealing the fact that you are armed, where the weapon is, and possibly the first movements. I remember reading Elmer Keith's stories about men who shot their opponents - not with the sixgun on their right hip, but with the left hand - and a gun in the pocket.
    I think there is more to mine here. But you have illustrated an excellent example.
    Clothing and equipment choices also fall into the realm of deception.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    306
    I believe competing on a regular basis changes some people`s internal wiring. They cannot help themselves, being in competition mode all the time whenever they enter the Dojo. For example compulsively pulling their punches-Unable to punch trough the target-Wanting to complete the Strike, before their opponent has had a chance to Block their Strike. Even when punching/kicking at the target like a Kicking Shield or moving up and down the Dojo floor without an opponent in front of them they will pull their Strikes wanting to 'Land Their Strikes First.' And even with the proper instruction and guidance from the instructor/senior student and their best intentions, their wiring will take over reverting back to Striking as fast as they can after only one/two techniques without them even noticing it.

    Even when practicing their Katas they will simply focus on the Speed Parts of the Kata, doing those parts of the form well and then neglecting the rest of the Kata. Blitzing through the Kata. The Kata simply turning into one fast sequence of techniques. Falling in the same trap that they to when practicing their Striking. Not able to take advantage of the rest of the training that the Kata offers.

    A good example of this is Jion. They will start of moving slow landing effective Front Kicks and accurate punches. Then when they reach the point in Jion when you need to move fast you can almost see their feet change gear in mid stride, compulsively switching to Speed Mode and they will simply try and move as fast as possible from that point on.

    So for this Karateka to simply decide to step away from Competition and to solely train for Self Defence is not enough. He basically needs to start over. Rewiring himself, getting rid of the bad habits he he formed and in some cases having to make piece with all the training time wasted.

    For most this is a daunting task and they will cling to their Competition Roots not willing to give up their training and admit that it is not transferable. Trying to turn their favorite competition techniques into effective Self Defence Techniques.

    OSSU
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    306
    STUDYING THE CLIPS
    What I noticed when the younger students started training in MMA at my Dojo was that they mastered the basics and understood the techniques a lot faster. It seemed to me that they grasp the techniques easier by being connected to their opponent. The techniques making more sense once they felt them. This left me wondering if we should not have students work with a partner first when learning a new technique and then work backwards from there, training the technique in the Kata to store it in our Muscle Memory, only after we understand the technique fully-Able to apply it in a Free Flowing manner.

    If you use the examples of the applications for HEIN/PINAN-NIDAN Katain these clips. a.Teaching proper Wrist Escapes, targeting the weakest point of the attackers hand and not only using the arm but the whole body. b.Kicking the attacker while he steps back, still in Kicking Range.

    Start of by teaching the student this part of the Kata. Then once the student can do the techniques without having to think about them to much it is time to move on to Two Man Sets.

    Then if the students are comfortable with these techniques in the Two Man Sets it is time to try and apply them/The principals behind them in Free Randori practice. Working against a Resisting opponent safely.

    Now practicing the Kata the techniques will make more sense to them. Having used the techniques-Knowing how they should look even in the air without a partner. And what all the movements in the Kata means. Including the transitions between the techniques. Instead of simply trying to remember to string a bunch of techniques together in the right sequence.

    NOTE It is interesting to me that Yamashiro is not worried about perfect technique. eg. With the opening technique of Pinan/Hein-Jondan Kata-Not making sure that the fingers of both hands are line up in a straight line and that both arms form a a perfect angle. Instead only concerned about being able to apply the techniques in the Katas effectively.

    It is a pity I will not be Grading again. It would have being great to be able to demonstrate that throw as my Pinan/Hein-Godan Kata Bunkai.

    Tenshinkan uses the block before the throw as a Crashing technique. Combining it with Tsuri-Ashi to reach the opponent quickly-a consensual technique mend for fighting at Sparring Distance. That is very effective in that context.

    OSSU
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    43,964
    Mine

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OTDP View Post
    I think it's limited.

    If you think of gunfight as only shooting, and see the adversary as only an IDPA target, there is zero application...but THAT is not gunfighting

    Karate, wrestling, boxing, fencing...they all have the characteristic that your technique interacts with the opponent's technique. Punch and block, parry and riposte, feint and attack.

    Shooting, archery, throwing stones...they do not directly interact with the opponent's technique. Deception is limited to concealing the fact that you are armed, where the weapon is, and possibly the first movements. I remember reading Elmer Keith's stories about men who shot their opponents - not with the sixgun on their right hip, but with the left hand - and a gun in the pocket.

    What we teach does not take into account or interact with an opponent? Since when? Have you attended one of MY force on force classes Mike? If not, I suggest making it top priority. Gunfighting is not target shooting...it is fighting...conceptually and practically just like any other combat system. And the Keith story...was he not doing the same...directly intercepting the timing and preempting the "punch"
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    306
    ABLE TO EXPLAIN THE TECHNIQUE SO I CAN TEACH IT

    You Block first to make contact.

    Using the same Hand Position to grab the attacker that you use in Pinan/Hein-Sandan to grab and punch the attacker near the end of the Kata.

    While at the same time Trapping the Arm-That is still able to cause damage-of the attacker against his body with an Open Hand.

    Place your foot behind your angle to trap his foot. QUESTION Do you not also clear a path for the throw by moving your foot out of the way.

    Drop to your knee and throw the attacker.

    OSSU
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

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