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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default AR Care & Cleaning For Beginners

    Ensure weapon is clear (always remove the magazine first before clearing the chamber). I have also found it beneficial to conduct cleaning and field stripping on a large clean surface.

    With the rifles muzzle pointed in a safe direction, retract charging handle while pushing the bolt catch. This will lock the Bolt Carrier Group (BCG) to the rear, be sure and manually lock the charging handle in the forward position. Check the magazine well and chamber for ammo. Once the rifle is verified clear, push the bolt release sending the BCG forward. Remove one end of the sling (two point slings only) then push the rear take down pin from the left to the right being sure to rest the barrel/hand guards on a steady surface.

    When the pin is fully extended to the right, it will be held in place by a detent. Open the upper receiver and slowly retract the charging handle. The BCG will move back to where you can pull the BCG and charging handle from the upper receiver. Set the BCG and charging handle aside. Closing the upper and lower receivers you can now depress the front take down pin from the left to the right, it will also be held by a detent. With both pins fully extended to the right, separate the upper and lower receivers.

    At this point you may want to remove the hand guards. Rest the upper receiver on a sold surface and apply downward pressure on the Delta Ring. Remove the top and bottom handguard one at a time. Using a partner makes removing the hand guards much easier. There are also tools designed to give you more leverage.

    To dissemble the BCG, extend the bolt in the forward position in the BCG. The Firing Pin Retainer pin will be on the left side of the BCG if the bolt is facing away from you. Pull out the Firing Pin Retainer pin and tilt your BCG up. The firing pin will either fall out or you can use a finger to pull it out. With the Firing Pin Retainer and firing pin removed, push the bolt back into the BCG and turn the cam pin lengthwise. Simply pull it out. This will allow you to remove your bolt from the BCG.

    With your bolt removed, use your firing pin to push out the extractor pin with applying pressure to the back of the extractor with your finger. You will be able to push the extractor pin far enough to grasp it with your fingers and pull it the rest of the way out. Keep all of these parts together preferably on a drop cloth or white paper.


    Use your charging handle to depress the buffer retainer. Pull the buffer and buffer/action spring from the lower receiver. This completes the field strip.

    Cleaning

    Proper lubrication is much more important than CLEAN. Keeping a rifle CLEAN without lube will cause malfunctions/stoppages. A well lubed rifle (not over lubed) can run for thousands of rounds without cleaning.


    Cleaning supplies:
    Cleaning rod with three sections
    Bore brush
    Slotted tip
    Patches
    Chamber brush
    Or a bore snake
    M16 tooth brush
    Cleaning cloths
    CLP
    No dental picks or any kind of scrapers needed. If you want to use a purpose built bolt scraper there is no harm in that.

    Areas to Clean:
    Bore, upper receiver, BCG
    Lower receiver, wipe down and brush debris out with M16 tooth brush
    Wipe down buffer and action spring
    Apply lube to bolt and four rails on the BCG

    Any Questions?
    Jon Payne
    Ambassador, Suarez Group of Companies
    Suarez International Law Enforcement Instructor

    The Two Most Dangerous Places in Today's World:
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    AK RIFLE GUNFIGHTING - OCT 26-27, 2019 HOUSTON, TX

  2. #2
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    This is the information I cover with officers in Patrol Rifle School. If we have any members new to the AR platform I hope they find it useful.
    Jon Payne
    Ambassador, Suarez Group of Companies
    Suarez International Law Enforcement Instructor

    The Two Most Dangerous Places in Today's World:
    1.) A Gun Free Zone
    2.) Your Comfort Zone

    Train with Payne 2019

    AK RIFLE GUNFIGHTING - OCT 26-27, 2019 HOUSTON, TX

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Richmond, VA
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    2,201
    Don't know about anyone else but I like to lube the lower (drop on each side of the hammer and trigger so that it gets on the springs/pins, drop on the disconnector/trigger where they contact the back of the hammer, drop on the safety shaft so it works its way out to the frame, every now and then I put some oil on the buffer spring/interior buffer tube walls).

    I also put some oil on the gas rings, extractor, locking lugs of the bolt. A drop. Been using Mobil 1 (mostly) for several years.

    I even put a drop of oil on the windage knob (where it meets the frame of the sight), the spring of the those metal GI BUIS (as usual, the name escapes my mind at the exact time I want to type it and I'll remember it 30 minutes from now while out with the dogs or getting a cup of coffee.) I, occasionally put a drop of oil at the front of the iron sights (on those rifles/carbines that have a GI front sight base) so that it gets onto the spring/detent that locks the front sight post in position.

    I understand dust/sand is an issue in some locations. Here in central VA I'd have to go dig a hole somewhere to find sand/dust most of the time (or run the big zero turn mower and suck it up out/off the grass.) I'm sure that I'm an "over oiler" but it has worked for me for well over 40 years in all kinds of bad (and good) weather in the areas I live in. I've seen way more guns screwed up with rust/corrosion than through "too much oil."

    I gave up trying to get a rifle, or pistol, spotlessly/white glove clean a long time ago.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    NWFL
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    14,885
    Quote Originally Posted by M1A's r Best View Post
    Don't know about anyone else but I like to lube the lower (drop on each side of the hammer and trigger so that it gets on the springs/pins, drop on the disconnector/trigger where they contact the back of the hammer, drop on the safety shaft so it works its way out to the frame, every now and then I put some oil on the buffer spring/interior buffer tube walls).

    I also put some oil on the gas rings, extractor, locking lugs of the bolt. A drop. Been using Mobil 1 (mostly) for several years.

    I even put a drop of oil on the windage knob (where it meets the frame of the sight), the spring of the those metal GI BUIS (as usual, the name escapes my mind at the exact time I want to type it and I'll remember it 30 minutes from now while out with the dogs or getting a cup of coffee.) I, occasionally put a drop of oil at the front of the iron sights (on those rifles/carbines that have a GI front sight base) so that it gets onto the spring/detent that locks the front sight post in position.

    I understand dust/sand is an issue in some locations. Here in central VA I'd have to go dig a hole somewhere to find sand/dust most of the time (or run the big zero turn mower and suck it up out/off the grass.) I'm sure that I'm an "over oiler" but it has worked for me for well over 40 years in all kinds of bad (and good) weather in the areas I live in. I've seen way more guns screwed up with rust/corrosion than through "too much oil."

    I gave up trying to get a rifle, or pistol, spotlessly/white glove clean a long time ago.
    In my area with high humidity and a lot of rain dust from roads that is the major source only occurs during dry spells.
    One who hammers his gun into a plow plows for those who do not....Unknown
    ...at the end of the day its not about anything else but YOU AND YOURS..... Gabe Suarez
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
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    One trick I like to help it go a little faster is using a solvent during the cleaning process. I like to use Non-chlorinated break cleaner to loosen/blow out crud in both receivers and to strip the old oil (do not get this on polymer or cerecote as it can discolor it).

    I then clean it completely. Once clean to my satisfaction, as I assemble each part I use a patch or Q-tip that's just damp with oil (I use 5w30 mobile 1) to wipe the parts down as I put them together. The BCG I leave wet NOT DRIPPING, but every part of the BCG goes together wet, everything else (buffer, spring, shaft of the charging handle, all internals) goes together with a sheen of oil, I want it shiney, not wet.

    When I put it back together I put a dab of oil on all external metal parts (sights, dust cover, optic mount, receiver pins) and use a clean dry rag to wipe all the excess off and off of the exposed portion of the bolt/carrier, that can be seen through the ejection port. If there's crud I have to clean up on the external moving parts I use a Q-tip or the M16 Toothbrush and apply the solvent to the tool, not the part and then clean the part followed by the above lubing instructions.
    Last edited by Greg Nichols; 12-31-2018 at 07:38 AM.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Phoenix, Arizona
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    Too much oil:

    There are signs of too much oil, 1) getting oil mist on your eye-pro, 2) smoking gun (I have literally seen smoking guns from lube burn off), 3) oil leaking from the seams of the receiver, trigger pins, receiver pins. 4) caked dust around the same areas (it's clinging to the excess oil).


    Not enough oil/still dirty:

    Use your ears and feel. Run the bolt and dry fire a few times once you get it back together. If the trigger or bolt feel gritty or hang-up, go back in and find the offending parts and correct the problem by either re-cleaning or lubing.

    Function Test:

    After a few dry fires, ensuring that you hear the hammer drops and the trigger resets properly take a cleaning rod with a plastic tip (no patch) and run it down the bore with the plastic tip towards the bolt and dry fire, the firing pin should make the cleaning rod jump a couple of inches in the bore. If it doesn't jump at all or only a tiny bit, pull the BCG and check the pin for damage or the firing pin channel of the bolt for crud.
    Last edited by Greg Nichols; 12-31-2018 at 11:31 AM.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    557
    Thoughts on Ed's Red as a basic CLP - kerosene, ATF Fluid, Acetone, mineral spirits in equal parts = Ed's

    Seems to work as well as anything commercial

  8. #8
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    If you want to spend the time mixing it why not? I like M-Pro 7 if I have it and have used Hoppe's #9 and Mobil 1 Synthetic 5w-30.
    Quote Originally Posted by reforger2002 View Post
    Thoughts on Ed's Red as a basic CLP - kerosene, ATF Fluid, Acetone, mineral spirits in equal parts = Ed's

    Seems to work as well as anything commercial
    Jon Payne
    Ambassador, Suarez Group of Companies
    Suarez International Law Enforcement Instructor

    The Two Most Dangerous Places in Today's World:
    1.) A Gun Free Zone
    2.) Your Comfort Zone

    Train with Payne 2019

    AK RIFLE GUNFIGHTING - OCT 26-27, 2019 HOUSTON, TX

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    557
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Payne View Post
    If you want to spend the time mixing it why not? I like M-Pro 7 if I have it and have used Hoppe's #9 and Mobil 1 Synthetic 5w-30.
    Ah but that's the beauty - I mixed a gallon just before #1 son was born 22 years ago. I've added a little acetone to the batch over the years and I'm down to maybe a pint. Maybe in the dead of winter I'll mix a fresh batch and even go whole hog and add lanolin to it. Assuming acetone and mineral spirits haven't been banned ...

    What's your thoughts on running a little red grease on the bolt carrier? I've seen guys doing that here seems to work well enough.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
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    114
    Quote Originally Posted by reforger2002 View Post
    Ah but that's the beauty - I mixed a gallon just before #1 son was born 22 years ago. I've added a little acetone to the batch over the years and I'm down to maybe a pint. Maybe in the dead of winter I'll mix a fresh batch and even go whole hog and add lanolin to it. Assuming acetone and mineral spirits haven't been banned ...

    What's your thoughts on running a little red grease on the bolt carrier? I've seen guys doing that here seems to work well enough.
    or white lithium grease?

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