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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    181

    Default Thoughts on a Kukri

    My boy is a scout and as such there are the obligatory camping trips and rather then pack along a boring hatchet I have been thinking about a Kukri lately, if for nothing else conversational purposes around the camp fire.

    I think I want a traditional one not some modern rendition from Cold Steel etc.

    On another gun board a guy posted pics of one he had custom made over in Nepal and got me thinking again about it. Its was from these guys.

    http://kailashblades.com/

    I am looking for some input. I'm am aware of Atlanta cutlery and their offerings.

    7M3

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Third Coast
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    4,180
    Well a knife doesn’t really replace a good chopper. I have a Craig Barr tomahawk that stands in for my hatchet. That might be the way to add some fun to scouts. Ragnar is in the house ( nobody sees small axes and natives anymore, only Vikings )
    NEVER CONFUSE GETTING LUCKY WITH GOOD TACTICS (unless you are at the bar)

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    1,351
    I'd forget the custom ones, just go old used mil spec combined with a cheap Mora knife and that will cover his needs.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Back in the day scouts didn't allow machetes or fixed blade knives, only hatchets, axes, and folders.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    1,086
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nichols View Post
    Back in the day scouts didn't allow machetes or fixed blade knives, only hatchets, axes, and folders.
    Fixed blade knives are still prohibited, and so is possession of firearms during scout activities.

    Doesn't change the fact that fixed blades are way better for camping duties than a folder, and that you'd be a fool to be camping without a long gun.

    I am a scout leader and haven't ever been on a campout without a fixed blade, g19RMR, and a 12 ga. BSA rules be damned.

    ETA: as far as the OP, I don't know much about kukris, but I would imagine for heavier chopping duties a hatchet would be a better tool. I suppose if all you're dealing with is small trees and branches that might be another matter.
    Last edited by apamburn; 12-14-2018 at 07:25 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    1,351
    Geeze. I must be old. BSA used to have two official models of fixed blade knives. They used to also do quarterstaff but that was before my time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    Remember yourTote'n'Chip card
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  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Fixed knives and guns - not welcome.

    Girls - welcome.

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    Pretty sure I earned the Shooting merit badge, and I know we shot at TMR.

    Upside down is right. Funny, too.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    1, 6, 9. And a wakeup.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    One issue with a kukri is that it is a "sheath knife" and many Boy Scout councils are full of limp-wristed pansy cucks who fear any fixed blades, don't know that folders can fold on fingers, and don't know that axe injuries are more dangerous than knife injuries. They don't understand the mechanics of a folding mechanism nor the physics behind an axe.

    Getting to the kurkri itself, there are issues to look out for.

    Many come with bad sheaths (usually those with traditional sheaths) which make them difficult to sheath and unsheath. This issue also occurs in high-end models at times, any fans of those companies generally gloss over this problem on forums. It is hit and miss with the sheaths. Be prepared to get a custom kydex sheath.

    Another problem with the sheaths, and I've had the same issue with barongs and bolos that have wooden sheaths, is that they are effected by humidity differences. What might be a good fit at one humidity level might be too loose or too tight at another.

    My Atlanta Cutlery kurkri came with a warning label not to have fingers near the edge on the sheath since it is possible to cut through it. When unsheathing or resheathing you hold the back of the sheath, you don't wrap your hands around the entire sheath.

    Atlanta Cutlery kukris have edges so bad they don't need sharpening, they need to be reprofiled. That can be a nice project, but don't expect it to come ready to use.


    My recommendation, if this is allowed, would be a Gerber Bear Grylls Compact Parang. The summer before last I did a lot of clearing, and while my primary tools were either a chainsaw, brush axe, or pole saw, I kept the parang on my belt for smaller tasks and it worked better than I expected. It is also less likely to scare sheeple unless they are full-blown pansies.

    Another issue to keep in mind is that Boy Scout camping is not wilderness survival or primitive camping, or anything similar to these activities. You don't carry a large blade, even the types allowed, and look for suitable wood for a fire or shelter and cut it. All cutting is done in an axe yard and the wood is brought to the axe yard and then cut.
    "Why should I trade one tyrant 3,000 miles away for 3,000 tyrants one mile away. An elected legislature can trample a man's rights as easily as the king can." Benjamin Martin, The Patriot

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