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Thread: JUTSU AND DO

  1. #21
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    Apr 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Absolutely. And while most of their followers might not agree, I think Ueshiba and Tohei would.
    I whole heartily agree with that. My original instructor was one of very few Americans who studied with O'Sensei. While Ueshiba preached the peaceful side he was still a child of much harder times. My dojo was not a hippy paradise. The funny thing was one of the top instructors was a hippy looking guy, long hair, very soft spoken, very calm and easy going, kind of peaceful easy feeling sorta guy. Except he was an ex recon Marine that did several tours in Vietnam. His version of Aikido would not sit well with the hippy set. So while I am more RyuKyu Kempo, Wing Chuan based I am not ashamed of my entry into the martial world.

  2. #22
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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    And while the thread is not about Aikido, and all Tohei-Uyeshiba mysticism aside, I will say that if you don't have the ability to hit people hard, you are not a fighter, you are a dancer. Whatever it is that you do, its got to work on the pissed off gang member with skills, not just the cooperative harmony-seeking hippy in the dojo.
    Yes !

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    247
    I can look at myself in the mirror and not see a weak "disabled" body. Instead I see a warrior, a fighter.

    I take pride in my physicality and what I achieved with my own blood, sweat and tears-Something that nobody can take away from me.

    Karate forms in me an Iron Will showing me that by not giving up I can accomplish any goal.

    Through Karate people get to meet Elfie first. Allowing me to express myself by the way I move and through my determination. Instead of simply seeing somebody trapped in a chair. (Their words not mine.) Not able to do anything.

    When practicing Karate I feel "normal" (Free) Obstacles suddenly change into simple training challenges that can be solved.

    I push and test myself using my muscles & limps proving to myself that I am more than just a brain, chained to a computer. Only useful when I am banging away on a keyboard.

    Finally Karate taught me the concept of tribe. Not only in how to be a good training partner but the definition of true friendship.

    Cheers
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  4. #24
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    Oct 2003
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    3,131
    [QUOTE=Gabriel Suarez;1924551 So what happened? How did the physical become "spiritual"?

    According to my research there are several factors.
    [/QUOTE]

    In addition to those:

    * Post WWII Japan there was a *deliberate* attempt to de-militarize and pacify Japan and the Japanese people. This was also expressed in the martial arts they taught and still teach.
    * After the Communist takeover in China there was a *deliberate* attempt to make the traditional martial arts into a watered down contest/dance so that it could not be used for (counter) revolution.
    * The Communists/Progressives/Left in America were (are) trying to do the same thing mostly with an impact on the strip mall schools.

  5. #25
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    Apr 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyOblivion View Post
    In addition to those:

    * Post WWII Japan there was a *deliberate* attempt to de-militarize and pacify Japan and the Japanese people. This was also expressed in the martial arts they taught and still teach.
    * After the Communist takeover in China there was a *deliberate* attempt to make the traditional martial arts into a watered down contest/dance so that it could not be used for (counter) revolution.
    * The Communists/Progressives/Left in America were (are) trying to do the same thing mostly with an impact on the strip mall schools.
    All true. Japan did some of the de-militarization to themselves when they brought Karate into the schools for Phys-Ed. Very true about China, the Boxer Rebellions still seems to be remembered, hence Kung-Fu becomes WuShu. As to MARTS taught now, I don't think it is so much a effort to water down the arts, I think it's more that the instructors just don't know how to do it right. You can find old school instructors but it is hard and you have to do a good bit of leg work to find them. What the left is really trying to water down, nay eliminate is the gun culture. If you look at what almost happened in Georgia it should be clear things are only getting worse.

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