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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    SoNH
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    126

    Default Dry Fire Practice - Transfers Skills Gun-to-Gun?

    I think I’m asking a question I know the answer to, but better to ask those who know better than guess:

    My dry-fire practice on one OEM Glock 19 probably transfers well to use of another OEM Glock 17 (similar suppressors sights and RMR)..

    But it probably transfers less well to an OEM SIG P320 with suppressor sights and Red Dot. That said, I’d guess I’d still do better with that SIG as I’m training my visual & neuromuscular systems to control shots.

    For those who dry-fire a lot with one Glock, do you feel the learning transfers well if you pick up a Glock with aftermarket trigger/action parts or another brand of gun altogether?

    I’ll confess my driver to ask is I have a G19 longslide with RMR and rail light, but got a MantisX www.mantisx.com rail dongle for live fire/dry fire practice. Rather than swapping the light off my primary pistol to practice with the MantisX I thought to dry-fire with another similar gun set up just for dry-fire and the MantisX and live fire with my primary gun.

    Thanks - BRET
    “Everything is what it is: liberty is liberty, not equality or fairness or justice or culture or human happiness or a quiet conscience.”Isaiah Berlin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
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    5,731
    Practice with variety. Skills transfer but I think you should practice dry with everything that you intend to shoot well.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    393
    It depends.
    Some folks can train and practice with a gun like a Glock and do great and then switch to something like a Sig and experience little to no lag in performance. I have a friend like this. I am not one of those folks. I have found a 17 and 19 to have different enough grip angles that I've commited to only shooting 19s. Then I have found such a wide variation of factory triggers in 19s that switching from one to another require a learning curve.
    The last IDPA match I shot I shot with a factory G19 modified only with SI sights. The trigger is, again factory, and is so much lighter and shorter than my primary pistol that when shooting from reset resulted in 2 missed shots as the trigger broke earlier than I expected. To combat this I put a 3.5lb connector in my primary gun as to get the 2 guns closer in trigger feel.
    Basicly I carry, train, practice and dry practice with my fighting gun and try to forget all else.
    Last edited by psalms23dad; 10-24-2018 at 09:01 AM.
    Be alert, stand firm in the faith, act like a man, be strong. Your every action must be done with love.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
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    44,570
    We had an informal event here for DA pistols. Most of,the attendees EDC a Glock so this was new. Results. Attendees shot the "foreign to their hand" DA pistols at about 90 percent as their familiar Glocks.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    393
    A few ramblings on dry practice.

    Don't just practice static range shooting. Practice everything you can that won't result in a bang that you cannot do at a public range. It's not just a activity to build marksmanship skills. Work on everything you've learned in class. Moving, after action assessment, off hand shooting, off hand drawing and shooting, hit a bag or BOB to initiate movement and then draw. Work on cover, room clearing, off position shooting (ie. on the ground). Get creative. Visualize your targets...

    Lastly, I've found that the factory Glock parts don't hold up. I do about 2 hrs +/- a week of dry practice. Switching to SI internals has been a huge improvement. No more chrome peeling off the MIM parts.
    Be alert, stand firm in the faith, act like a man, be strong. Your every action must be done with love.

    “Adversity introduces a man to himself.”

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    15,455
    Here is my 2 cents (if worth that much even). You should practice with what you plan to carry. The motor skills and ingrained memory will be best for that weapon. But I also think it would carry over some to any weapon. Sure there would be some difference in the manipulation but the mantra of sight picture and sight alignment would be the same (if both weapons have similar sighting systems). You would also be building muscle strength in holding and using the weapon. Again I would spend most of the time with my carry weapon, but would also spend some time with those I might carry infrequently.
    I rather you hated me for who I am than love me for who I ain't!
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
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    Where I find the biggest difference is in the full presentation of the pistol. With the mild differences in grip angles, weight, and balance between platforms and my presentation being trained through thousands of reps with Glocks I find the sights may not be immediately on line (I either end up pointing slightly high or low) with another platform other than Glock. It's not a huge issue, with unsighted fire there is a mild adjustment after the first round and with sighted fire there is a moment of alignment before firing. I noticed this most when I used to compete with a 1911 but carried/trained with G-19s. After a full day of shooting the 1911 my Glock point would be slightly off, after a couple of dry presentations it was back on point and I'd load and holster for the drive home. Conversely before competition I would have to do a few dry presentations from the holster to get the feel back before competing. I actually liked this process because it was another subconscious indicator of if I was playing a game or preparing for a fight.
    Last edited by Greg Nichols; 10-24-2018 at 12:19 PM.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,425
    Quote Originally Posted by cbjesseeNH View Post
    <snip>

    I’ll confess my driver to ask is I have a G19 longslide with RMR and rail light, but got a MantisX www.mantisx.com rail dongle for live fire/dry fire practice. Rather than swapping the light off my primary pistol to practice with the MantisX I thought to dry-fire with another similar gun set up just for dry-fire and the MantisX and live fire with my primary gun.
    MantisX sells adapters that replace the base plates on mags. If you want to stick with Glocks, buy an adapter and put it on the longest mag you use. It will then fit any of your Glocks of the same type mag. As an added bonus, you can buy additional adapters for other guns and use the MantisX on them, also.

    John W in SC

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    SoNH
    Posts
    126
    All great stuff Gabe and others - many thanks. I pulled some parts and decided to replace the trigger system and firing pin with NP3 parts. Thanks again.


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    “Everything is what it is: liberty is liberty, not equality or fairness or justice or culture or human happiness or a quiet conscience.”Isaiah Berlin

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