Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,280

    Default 0-5 Feet Gunfighting, Oct 2018

    As usual, we had a group of outstanding students. It was truly an honor to train with all you hard chargers. This was a challenging class and everyone pushed themselves to learn and excel. THANK YOU!

    Special thanks to SI instructor Eric Tull for coming out to play. I look forward to the next time!!

    For now, just some pics.

    572B7E9E-2B49-4E73-B4D8-A1673B01490A.jpg

    F6188F4C-FF57-4436-A04C-44CA9F5FB871.jpg

    25F40A52-7F2A-4BD1-8F6C-3E0882271A1D.jpg

    6A3CC35E-290D-4529-95C1-E3309A5B6D84.jpg

    A7892A28-0EB5-4A56-9F34-5FD66BAA1BD8.jpg
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,280
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,280
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,280

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,280
    K has been a karate and aikido student of mine for a long time. She essentially had no gun training prior to this class. She was the smallest and lightest person in the class but I think the guys can attest that she held her own.
    111B4D89-03D3-496C-9C27-F4881D0B7DA3.jpg

    Eric seems to be enjoying me tearing his ear off. Eric is an EXCELLENT training partner. When hands on he is calm and able to keep things at a safe pace, engaged but not tense. He understands the difference between LEARNING and FIGHTING. I hope the other guys appreciated this as much as I did.
    643D859D-9ACF-4CC7-8A95-B1261FEB76AC.jpg

    Some retention stuff...
    34501463-AF62-44C9-9950-CFDD96B9D658.jpg

    Which lead into throwing stuff. This is where aikido is useful.
    FEBEB3AC-2729-4E55-8922-D176FB88B901.jpg
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,811
    From this old dog's POV:

    Jonathan's appreciation is superb. Read it twice. So should you.

    For an old guy with little formal training who's picked up a move or two in an eventful life, this training was ideal. The first PGF was great; this class was better. Brent goes from strength to strength as an instructor.

    This class should be taught more frequently, especially as diagonal lines training is refined and integrated. The true nature of gunfighting has finally emerged. Thank you, Gabe and Brent.

    I humbly disagree on something fundamental: the one-step ideally is competitive: you are seeking to gain advantage in each move you initiate, and you are then helping your partner defeat that movement.
    You are playing chess against yourself.

    This was especially true as we combined elements and techniques on the third day. I never thought I'd hear myself say, "You have a gun! Shoot me in the foot!" Or: "Bring the gun up over your shoulder and shoot me in the head!" This is where I found the TDA very useful--you don't need to tap-rack to get the subtle tactile and auditory reinforcement of getting the shot off, without the encumbrance of SIMs and UTM protective gear or the cleanup afterward (valuable tools, but not in the dojo).

    Thanks to Brent for his patience at my frequent interruptions. I felt like that kid in the class who keeps raising his hand.

    Thanks to Eric for reminding me to slow down. It's easy to get a little too emphatic in movement. That said, no one cut me any slack for being old and clumsy, nor should they have.

    Major takeaways for me: don't run backwards (MOTO, right?), the takeoff dive, the short right hand power punch that works much better with a bone on bone shoulder joint.

    Advice: wear wrestling shoes or similar for the mat work. I saw a lot of missing skin on feet. Also--loosen the tension on the holster, if that's available in the design: there will be plenty of adrenaline to assist during the real thing, but hundreds of draws from a tight holster during training will hurt for days afterward.

    Finally, as you can tell from our expressions, this class was fun. I have attended training where all you heard was grunts, groans, bodies hitting the mat, and the instructor yelling. Brent, with Eric's able assistance, created a training environment that allowed us to confront and embrace a grim reality with humor, creativity and power.


    PS: Unless you actually weigh a ton and a half, can run 30 MPH, and have a large horn or two on your head, fighting like a rhino sucks.
    Last edited by Papa; 10-23-2018 at 07:48 AM.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    1, 5, 13. And a wakeup.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    313
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    Thanks to Brent for his patience at my frequent interruptions. I felt like that kid in the class who keeps raising his hand.
    These were some fantastic moments in class, Papa! Having fellow students with unique persperspectives who have BTDT to validate the instructors training and share their own experience is immensely valuable. When I am training in my own dojo and our brown belt police officer shares a story, I listen; he has seen and used this stuff. I haven't.

    Another great moment was hearing Eric's story of his latest real-world encounter. It perfectly summed up the class and made everything click. I won't spoil it by sharing (I would probably butcher it anyway); for those who weren't there, you'll have to take the class!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,280
    Mine
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    This class should be taught more frequently, especially as diagonal lines training is refined and integrated. The true nature of gunfighting has finally emerged. Thank you, Gabe and Brent. I will set up some more frequent, short training sessions in the dojo. That is always on my to-do list, just need to get it done.


    I never thought I'd hear myself say, "You have a gun! Shoot me in the foot!" Or: "Bring the gun up over your shoulder and shoot me in the head!" ha! I understand this sentiment very well.

    This is where I found the TDA very useful--you don't need to tap-rack to get the subtle tactile and auditory reinforcement of getting the shot off, without the encumbrance of SIMs and UTM protective gear or the cleanup afterward (valuable tools, but not in the dojo). Agreed. I had a couple training Sigs on hand and meant to get them in people's hands to compare. Maybe next time.

    Thanks to Brent for his patience at my frequent interruptions. I felt like that kid in the class who keeps raising his hand. Brother, keep on interrupting. Those moments are important for more reasons than I can count.

    Thanks to Eric for reminding me to slow down. It's easy to get a little too emphatic in movement. Eric is really great at that. It's an excellent

    Major takeaways for me: don't run backwards (MOTO, right?), the takeoff dive, the short right hand power punch that works much better with a bone on bone shoulder joint. We can work more on all those.

    Finally, as you can tell from our expressions, this class was fun. I have attended training where all you heard was grunts, groans, bodies hitting the mat, and the instructor yelling. Brent, with Eric's able assistance, created a training environment that allowed us to confront and embrace a grim reality with humor, creativity and power. Excellent. People learn best when they are having fun. Even if it's hard work.


    PS: Unless you actually weigh a ton and a half, can run 30 MPH, and have a large horn or two on your head, fighting like a rhino sucks. I like the animal exercise A LOT, primarily for people that have no martial H2H background. And for those that do, it can be a valuable tool for creativity and self-learning...some weird shit sometimes works very well. Rhino is one of my favorites, but requires really solid structure. Can't muscle that one.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    313
    Wow! What a weekend. I hate using clichés, but if I had to use one to sum up this class it would probably involve firehoses.

    For those unfamiliar with this class, the purpose is to learn how to get to your pistol in a lethal situation. Sometimes there is business to be taken care of before the draw. This class covers it! Brent likes to call this stuff karate at 1200FPS; I think it is just as much chess at 1200FPS.

    The informal Friday evening class started the weekend off with a bang: Brent started with going over the “diagonal lines” kata and then drilled down into the GOTX details. We spent a lot of time working on the dynamics of this initial movement. We reinforced our technique with line-drills involving the SIRT pistol (an extremely useful training/feedback tool). Brent then led us through the building blocks for the rest of the class: simple blocks and strikes. We drilled these over and over again until we felt fairly comfortable performing them at speed. We were also introduced to the excellent training technique called the “One Step Drill”, in which two partners take turns slowly exchanging strikes. It was constantly emphasized that this is not a competitive exercise. It is a mutual training tool to learn to look for openings/opportunities and learn to contact your opponent’s target areas. I got the most out of these drills when I worked through it slowly and discussed action/reaction options with my training partner.

    Saturday began learning a variety of new warm-up techniques and relearning the blocks and strikes from the night before. Some of the warm-up exercises didn’t make a whole lot of sense until we started working through scenarios. I found several new warm-ups that I want to incorporate into my workout routines. After warm-up, we talked about structure. The key principle is to only engage the muscles necessary to get the job done. Engaging too many muscles makes you slow and easy to manipulate. It sounds basic, but it is so critical to all that we would learn later. Brent showed us several “parlor tricks” to demonstrate the concept of structure and verify that we were using proper structure. We learned principles for falling and getting up. Next, we worked through one-step-drills using different blocks/strikes on our opponents. Again, the purpose was to learn to use angles, see targets, and test range. On some of these drills, Brent dictated that we could only use punches or elbows or arm bars; the purpose was to really focus on a single strike or technique. During other iterations, one training partner would be the attacker, while the other would only defend and look for attack opportunities. As the day progressed, we started incorporating pistol access both from standing and ground positions into these drills.

    Brent also used focused training exercises that I’ll call “snapshot scenarios”, for lack of a better term. They focused on one aspect of the fight. Instead of “taking turns”, though, the scenarios were more fluid and freestyle while each partner acted a part. For example, one partner might attempt to take the other’s pistol, while the other tried to prevent it. These tended to be faster paced and more dynamic, but, again, the best training moments were those in which each partner discussed options with the other. These scenarios were performed for learning to move in the clinch, feeling the opponent’s movement, accessing a pistol on the ground with a standing opponent, and knife/club attacks. During Saturday, we also discussed chokes and how to apply them. Brent then gave a “lecture session” in which we discussed the three types of movement (proactive, reactive and opportunistic), the four purposes of movement (avoiding damage, improving position, worsening opponent’s position, and inflicting damage), and the three outcomes of movement (moving the opponent, inflicting pain, inflicting damage, and inflicting shock).

    Sunday, I woke up more sore than I’ve been in a while, but there was still a ton more to learn. In fact, everything we learned Saturday was just the building blocks of what we would learn Sunday. After another good warm-up session, we went through defense against a close-range knife attack. These techniques were again studied using the methods of the one-step-drill and snapshot scenarios. Then we moved to pistol defense techniques based on the RCAT principle (re-grab, control, attack, and takeaway). We learned methods for both dealing with a close-range pistol threat from the front and from the sides. Then we learned the more difficult scenario of dealing with a mid-range pistol threat. Once we felt comfortable with the counter-attack for the mid-range threat, Brent and Eric had us perform the drill individually while we were recorded on an IPad; this allowed Brent and Eric to playback our execution of the drill and critique it. It was an incredibly helpful training technique that I need to use in my own practice! For the rest of the day, we performed “snapshot scenarios” involving an opponent’s attempts to access his pistol and the good guys pistol (either holstered or drawn). We discussed details such as braced pistol shots and methods for drawing the pistol with the support hand.

    The amazing thing about this class is that it was useful across such a range of experiences. I have a martial arts background, but Brent started on the ground floor and built everything up in a very organized and methodical way, so that those with no martial arts experience could also catch on. The basic moves taught were very instinctive and primal allowing them to be learned quickly. I liked the fact that several of them I recognized from former martial arts training making the application more real for me. Brent’s main objective was to give us solid principles for fighting and to give us techniques that were simple enough to employ immediately; but the principles he gave us would allow us to improvise as we progress in our skills. Some of the best principles were around the initial need to get off the line of attack, the need for constant movement, the need for good structure, and the need to test all assumptions through training scenarios. Brent's illustration of an octopus really brought to life the need to use every appendage available to defend, improve position, alter the opponent's position, and inflict damage.

    In all, the class could not have gone better, from my perspective. It confirmed some things that I knew and adjusted my thinking on a lot of other things. The breadth of experience and background of each of the students added an excellent dimension when combined with their common desire to become more dangerous and help each other learn. And of course, the skill and humility of both Brent and Eric as martial art practitioners and teachers made it remarkable.

    I am truly looking forward to the next opportunity to train with all of you. Thanks Brent and Eric for all the hard work and patience you put into training us and thanks to all the folks that I trained with!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    313
    Also, if anyone wants my notes from the class for future reference, PM me with an e-mail address and I will get them to you!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •