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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    45,900

    Default BUT I AM OLD AND FAT

    Amazingly I just got an email after I posted the discussion on our force on force program integrating the "old ways" with the pistol. Here it is in essence.

    "Sensei, I want to learn what you are teaching in this class but I am 65 and overweight. I can't move like you guys do. I am not the only one. There are lots of old fat guys that want to be able to defend their families".

    So how do we answer this gentleman? One way is to water down what we know is important in order to be inclusive. Is that a good thing? What are the other answers? Lets share here without slamming the door on his face.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    10,006
    It's not going to get better on it's own. You really have only 2 choices, learn to work with what you have and your limitations with the understanding that your performance and progression will be limited by your lifestyle. Or door #2, Start fixing it. Get your diet, T levels, and exercise routine down right now. I have a friend who had 2 knees worked on due to being 5'9" maybe and well over 400#. Since June he's down below 330# and still working.

    There is no secret, if you're old, fat, and weak you'll never be able to defend your family as well as you can if you're fit and strong. Age is just an excuse, Ted's been around since rocks were soft, I actually think he was an upper classman to methuselah, and he's more fit than most men a third his age.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
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    #thinkinginviolence
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    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Somewhere in the Appalachians.
    Posts
    3,626
    I would suggest a low carb/paleo diet and moderate exercise before he attends shooting classes.

    At 65, I would expect a man to move a little slower and be a little more stiff...nonetheless, you can't defend your family if you die of a heart attack first.
    Isaiah 54:17

    Deus dea traballo, dixo o enterrador.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    45,900
    I think Ted's first airship involved wax and feathers, but my first issued pistol required flint.

    I recall the helicopter pilot we had in class not long ago. A wax-and-feathers type guy who'd survived a horrendous air unit crash. Walked with a cane because he refused to think a wheel chair was for him. And he did well in class because he moved as far past his physical injuries as possible, and developed work-arounds for those he could not overcome.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    3,723
    Well, I am old and thin, or so I'm told. I want the full benefit of any instruction regardless of my injuries and "limitations" and would feel cheated, disappointed and embarrassed if the training were watered down. Rather try my best and fail than go "lite."
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:15

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    7,584
    Remedial gunfighting class? Segregate them from the rest that are pushing harder. The fact is that they are in more danger of a heart attack then anything else statistically. If someone can't move then their only option is to be a meat shield and soak up rounds while their loved ones try to get away. Hopefully their family isn't out of shape.
    Geek Warlord
    Dungeons & Dragons & Deadlifts

    Muscle Wizard Casts: Fist


    CRG-1 DPS
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    HRO-6 CQB: Fighting in Structures
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    TWOTU edition
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    TWOTU since May 2015

  7. #7
    What exactly do they think is the issue? Can't move as quick as the young'uns? Don't have the mobility? Don't have the stamina do a whole day class? Or what?

    Then, if they're actually correct in thinking there's an issue, remedial exercises for whatever it is.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,790
    Some thoughts...

    I recall that Geezer impressed with his attitude and willingness to adapt to FOF training. Attitude means a lot. On the other hand, the reality is that peak combat effectiveness or any kind of highly physically demanding activity is really a young person's domain. There is a reason that 50 year olds aren't winning at Wimbledon.

    As a business person, obviously it's up to you, Gabe, to decide how much you are willing to water down or slow down classes in order to accommodate less physically able students. There's only so far you can go before the bulk of your students get short changed and you feel like you're sacrificing too much. What if you have limited offerings of "specialty" classes with modified curriculum for those who are older and/or slower? Maybe only once in a while? You could bill them as having extra emphasis on coaching students with disabilities how to maximize their "potential" or something. (I'm not good at writing ad copy). Or perhaps steering them toward individual coaching is better in a lot of cases.
    "No plan survives contact with the 82nd Airborne Division."
    "Zen? Meh! Who needs it? All that effort to achieve nothingness and what do you got? Bupkis!"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,894
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nichols View Post
    There is no secret, if you're old, fat, and weak you'll never be able to defend your family as well as you can if you're fit and strong.

    Age is just an excuse, Ted's been around since rocks were soft, I actually think he was an upper classman to methuselah, and he's more fit than most men a third his age.
    This.

    Ted trains in my dojo with me every week. He's an inspiration to everyone. I hope more people can be half as fit as he is by the time they get to Ted's point in life.


    Not everyone moves well, I get it. There's only one way to improve that - START MOVING.

    One of the wonderful things about kata is that you can do it almost anywhere. You can do it by yourself, with no one watching. You can do it as slow as you want, as often as you want.

    I have been practicing Karate kata since I was 10 years old. I STILL practice kata in slow motion at times. There is nothing wrong with slow motion practice, and much can be learned from it whether you're a raw beginner, a master, or anyone in between.

    And it's not a "slow is smooth, smooth is fast" thing. It's a learning how to move thing. And once you know how to move, once you've established the patterns, you can improve even more. I don't care how good you are, there is room for improvement.

    Are you slow? Out of shape? Overweight? Feeling bad because you can't move well? The answer is just start doing the kata. Every day. EVERY DAMN DAY. You will get better, but only if you make a decision to get better, and only if you have the discipline to see it through.

    DECIDE to practice kata for 10 minutes a day. I challenge you. 10 minutes a day is all it takes. You will get better - skill will improve and your fitness will improve.


    Focus more on fitness. Exercise more, and exercise more discipline at the dinner table. Do the kata. If protecting you and yours is important to you, you will do it. If not...well...there's not much we can do to help you.

    But if you are motivated, we will help get you there.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,894
    I do not water down my classes. Period.

    BUT...I will modify things for individuals.

    Fitness is on the individual. It's up to you to be as fit as you can be. But injuries can be difficult to work around. Sometimes the workaround is not obvious, but that's what an experienced instructor is there to do.

    I always teach the "standard" technique. The technique that is ideal. From there it can be modified based on individual limitations.

    The reality is that sometimes a given technique will not be possible for someone. Example - many Karate kata have kicks, and most of those kicks are performed at stomach level. Age and injuries can put that technique literally out of reach for some people. So we modify it. Perhaps it becomes a kick to the knee, or to the shin. Or perhaps we change it to a knee strike instead of a kick. Or perhaps it just becomes a step. Being able to perform a specific kick isn't so important. Being able to perform SOMETHING is.

    And I always tell my students to think for themselves. But also there are times just to listen to sensei. ;)
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

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