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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Made it to Free America
    Posts
    13,287
    I bitch a lot about bad commanders because I guess I ran into more than my fair share BUT there were a few (well maybe more than a few) good ones. The bad ones standout especially when you run into a series of them one after the other, and then you start to think they are the only kind of bosses left. When bad bosses get promoted it becomes worse BUT there are or at least were a few good ones in my career.

    One in particular, I bet you already know. He worked Baltimore City PD and spent the majority of his time with the Homicide Unit. After 20+ years with Baltimore City, he "started over" with Baltimore County PD and is currently a Lt. You guys know him as John Munch, the TV character from Homicide Life on the Streets and Later Law & Order SVU. The John Munch character was based on him. Had a small role in The Wire, playing a Baltimore City shift Lt.

    I had the pleasure to work for him (he would say we worked together) for a year or so. He was the kind of boss that spent hardly no time in the office and most of it on the street. He also spent a lot of time telling his bosses they were full of shite; but he did it in a way that they thanked him for the advice.

    He was the kind of guy that you would carry open buckets of gasoline through Hell for, except if you looked back he was working on his second load....problem was there weren't enough of him.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    6,975
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanNobody View Post
    All promotions from Deputy to Captain require extensive testing (written, essay, project with presentation, and in some cases physical exams). Captain to Chief is appointed. Sheriff is voted in.

    Every agency Iíve ever seen follows this model to some extent.
    One of the things that makes Alaska unique is how few offices are elected. I believe itís a remnant of our days as a territory, before statehood. At first, I balked at the system. I grew up with elected sheriffs and thought that a system built on appointments deprived the voters of a voice. But I have come to appreciate the system. Voters are stupid, and our appointed chiefs are less vulnerable to political fads and angry mobs.



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Virtute et Armis

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    3,105
    I've had exactly one mentor in 36 years and counting, and that was in my current gig. I have had 6 good bosses, but they were/are not mentors. I was happy to have them regardless, but I was expected to sink or swim.
    If you have mentors or good bosses, treasure them. If you have those who are both, you are truly blessed.

    I went to a wake yesterday, of a very good man who was also a homicide detective in our agency. Our careers overlapped as I worked closely with him before I became a street cop.
    He retired in 2007. Seems like yesterday.
    Despite the email from current admin praising him, not one member of the current admin from my agency showed up. I was one of 3 still working at my agency and I saw 2 other working LEOs. 2 current members of the PA's office showed. There was a handful of retired LEOs.
    This man was a decorated Viet Nam veteran and had worked as an LEO for 26 years. He was an inspiration and a mentor to many in our department.
    The good news is that the room was packed with friends and family. No surprise, those who took the open mike talked of how he helped and mentored others, and how beloved he was. Without bogging down in detail, this was a rich and quintessentially American life, but that aspect is for another thread.

    If you find yourself in authority, or fought to be there, be a good boss. If you have something of value to pass on, be a mentor yourself. If you can do both, you have a rare opportunity. Expect no thanks or praise, but do what is, or should be, expected.
    Look outside the narrow world of your employment for renewal and affirmation.

    And avoid bitterness. It's called that for a reason.
    Last edited by Papa; 10-01-2018 at 08:27 AM.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    1, 2, 11. And a wakeup.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    507

    Default Warrior, Leader, Inspiration, Hero, and Mentor

    I don't know the man, but I saw this for the first time this morning.

    Master Sgt. Israel Del Toro Jr. "Stay strong, finish strong, and never F@%#ing quit!"

    His story:
    https://abcnews.go.com/US/video/mast...ional-38986968
    And let the one who has no sword sell his cloak and buy one. Luke 22:36

    Steven Spaugh

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    3,105
    Outstanding.

    And God bless Prince Harry for helping found the Games.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    1, 2, 11. And a wakeup.

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