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  1. #1
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    Default CMP Sniper Match

    I attended a CMP Sniper Match today. This was a local club level event. Honestly Im not sure how it rates CMP, but that's what they called it. There were two categories: Vintage and Modern. Both categories were comprised of a shooter and a spotter and the roles switched so the both parties shot and spotted during the course of fire.

    The Vintage category included all sniper rifles and replicas, from 1953 and earlier, from any nation. Optics were required to be "correct" for the era and nationality of the rifle. The scope mounts also had to be original or replicas and "correct", (no picatinny rails on M1903’s and no Lee Enfields in 6.5 Creedmoor).

    The Modern category was a little bit easier on equipment options for sniper and designated marksman rifles. They were classed as 1954 and later rifles/designs from any nation. Any dispute on authenticity placed the burden of proof with the participant. All rifles in the modern sniper/designated marksman rifles were required to be equipped with back-up metallic sights (more on that). Chambering was also required to be "correct" for the rifle model. The maximum telescopic sight magnification was limited to 10X. Any style reticle was permitted.

    The shooting was all done from the prone. The spotter could be next to the shooter or behind. Spotting scopes of any style were permitted and spotters were encouraged to call shots for their team member. The match started with 3 "sighting rounds". After the targets were replaced, the shooters fired for record (10 shots in 5 minutes). Modern and Vintage competed side by side.

    The vast majority of rifles were AR15s, most in some sort of "civilian" form (handguards, grips, bi-pods etc). There were 2 M1a's, 1 M1D (Garand), and 1903A4. The Garand and '03A4 looked to be correct and possibly original. I was one of the M1a users. My rifle is a LRB "M14" dressed as an early 1990s M21 with a SWFA "Super Sniper" scope (fixed 10X with mill dots). I never actually saw a SWFA scope when I was active duty but I did know they were in service back then and still have a NSN number. Thanks Dog Doc, the scope is great.... There are better optics, but Im not sure there are better in the "Super Sniper" price range (sub $500)

    Shooters were allowed to use a bi-pod, sling, pack or sandbag for front rest BUT only one and no artificial rear support was permitted. Most shooters opted for bi-pods; but the one vintage guy used sandbags and the other used a sling! Before the match the story of troops landing at Tarawa was related, where "Old Timers" took a second to "sling up" from behind cover and then return accurate fire on the enemy.

    The match was also open to "junior" shooters. The 3rd place team was comprised of a father and son. Dad is former SOG and his son is 9 years old! Ive seen this young man shoot against professionals without any advantages. He is SCARY GOOD.

    Scoring was 12pts for head shots, 10pts for center mass body shots, -3 for non center mass hits, -5 for hits outside the black and -10 for off papers hits. A perfect score would have been 480 combined points for the team.



    If I have any "complaints" with the match its only that shooters in the Modern class (ONLY the Modern class) were required to fire three shots with the scope removed. The match director insisted that modern snipers must be able to remove and replace their optic and be able to shoot with iron sights. While I agree that iron sights have a place, Im not sure I see the virtue of removing and replacing optics on a precision rifle. The alternative was to accept 3 misses (minus 30 points). Nevertheless the match was fun.
    Last edited by EDELWEISS; 09-15-2018 at 06:30 PM.

  2. #2
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    No one is removing the optic from their M40A6, XM2010, Mk13, or M107...and no one is removing them from their M110s either. That's a joke of a requirement in a match.

  3. #3
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    We used to do "Redneck Rules" shoots at one club. Guys who were not shooting were at the bar for hours then spouted out the "rules"

    As much as $5 was bet on results.

    A good time was had by all.

    Every purposeful round put down range has toolbox value.

    Choirboy

  4. #4
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    The match director seems like a nice guy; but he also went into the "instructor mode" (as in: I know more than you so Ill impress you with my knowledge). His house his rules, so I just took the minus 30pts. I joked that I thought taking the scope off a precision rifle was stupid and he told me about having to do it when he was a sniper. He also said he was told to use a shoe lace to clean his barrel because a steel rod would ruin it. I wanted to call BS; but figure there was no plus side to that???

    Anyway it was FUN. I got to shoot, the competition stress was low but still you didn't want to embarrass yourself. Getting beat by a 9 year old was bad enough....

  5. #5
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    Oct 2004
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    Anyway it was FUN. I got to shoot, the competition stress was low but still you didn't want to embarrass yourself. Getting beat by a 9 year old was bad enough..---Edel

    Last year I bought the 9 year old GD a .22 Savage -- bolt 5 shot detachable mag.

    I had a cheap 4x scope that I put on it. She was too small for my bench so we put some sandbags on a picnic table and shot at 100 after I zeroed the scope. We were shooting at our respective targets and she was really concentrating on all of my position, breathing and slow trigger squeeze instructions.

    We went up to tape the targets and she said "Pappy my bullet holes are smaller than yours"

    Humble pie duly eaten.

    Choirboy

  6. #6
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    Sep 2012
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    CMP sniper matches are no different that a Sunday afternoon rifle match. There’s nothing ‘sniper’ about shooting at static 300 and 600 yard targets. And the rules being what they are and the CMP heavily favoring Springfield rifles, the 1903a1’s with 8x scopes almost always end up winning. The CMP matches are less about shooting skill than scope power.

    Personally I’d like to see something more like the Snipers Hide Cup or PRS matches with vintage equipment. The shooters skill would ring out more important than scope power and with the fragility of the 8x Uterl scopes, I think you’d see most shooters gravitate to other more reliable rifle/scope platforms.


    "If you find yourself in a fair fight you failed to properly prepare..."

    "History is the autobiography of a madman..."

  7. #7
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    Todays match was for fun. It wasn't really competition, not serious competition anyway. PRS is much more in the serious competition realm; but I look at it like golf--Im not doing it to beat the other shooters, just beat my last score. ME getting better is more important (to me) than worrying about beating a Gamer

    I like PRS; but find a huge part of it is how fast you can get into position. Typically there are 10 shots per stage with a 90 second time period, so getting into position FAST and shooting FAST means the difference between hits and not getting the rounds off.

    I try NOT to game it, even though it IS a game. I see a lot of the "big" shooters going to the barricades before the shoot to "game" what positions to use (Kneel, Sit, etc) and what gear to use (tripod, bi-pod, bag, etc). I don't do that. I take on the course as if its a real shoot to engage real threats, where theres no prep time.

    Ill definitely do more of these classic sniper shoots, maybe next time Ill bring a PEM Mosin?

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