Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    44,793
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OTDP View Post
    It's well established that mental training is fundamental to top performance in a wide range of disciplines. Perhaps the greater question is why the shooting community (outside the top tier of the precision disciplines) has not worked with it earlier.
    Truth?

    Because most are lazy and ignorant, and so focused on saving money with cheap reloads for their CCW insurance that they could not be bothered.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    10,528
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OTDP View Post
    It's well established that mental training is fundamental to top performance in a wide range of disciplines. Perhaps the greater question is why the shooting community (outside the top tier of the precision disciplines) has not worked with it earlier.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    Truth?

    Because most are lazy and ignorant, and so focused on saving money with cheap reloads for their CCW insurance that they could not be bothered.
    The exact same reason that the majority of the "regular" shooting community is fat as fat can be. Discipline in anything other than working on split times is nonexistent, and the mentality that if they can shoot they don't need to be able to fight.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,324
    It's threads like this that keep me here.
    I'll likely never be fat, but lazy--well, not as long as I have this burr under my saddle.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    1, 11, 17. And a wakeup.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,577
    Once the body has learned a skill, "mental practice" is a valid technique. There have been several documented instances where an athlete of one type or another was injured and hospitalized, and returned to the field better than before... using only mental practice/meditation. Obviously the only practice they could get while laid up in a hospital.

    Here is a study on Olympic athletes and mental practice.
    http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/...1991.72.3.1007

    If we were to look at this from a martial arts perspective, it would likely tie into Mushin somewhere.

    ETA: Another article.
    http://www.dana.org/News/Details.aspx?id=43530

    Yes. I know we arent playing sports. But there is applicable knowledge here.
    Last edited by H60DoorGunner; 09-17-2018 at 04:00 PM.
    Isaiah 54:17

    Deus dea traballo, dixo o enterrador.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    121
    I'm jumping in to this a bit late, real world demands have kept me off line, so some of this may have been covered in other replies.

    Kata is typically thought of as a physical form, a pattern of movement. The concept of kata is a robust training tool that passes on lessons learned in blood to future generations. The form is like a proper malfunction response, non diagnostic. With this in mind, things like the flowchart can and should be considered a mental kata in the classical, practical sense. It passes on lessons that have been learned in the real world and gives one the ability to practice the skills needed to survive. In short, practiced properly, the mental process will allow someone the ability to train proper psychological and emotional responses to a critical incident. The same way that properly trained kata will instill the correct physical response. The process is not situation specific, except that we are dealing with a legally justified shoot, either pro or re-active.

    Jim Miller
    ISA 6:8

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    249
    VISUALIZING TRAINING:
    Some point in my training I started spinning my wheels, not literally in my case! Unable to create any forward momentum, not improving. Simply blasting out reps executing my drills mindlessly. Aiming to hit that magical 4000 Rep count.

    I started to set aside time after class for reflection and to visualize what happened during Knive Sparring.

    Trying to recalled what worked(When I was able to reach my attacker with a Stab/Slash)-FINAL STEP. What the techniques were that I used that led up to me being able to land the attack-SET UP TECHNIQUES. Including how my Sparring Partner reacted to these techniques before I was able to land that Stab/Slash. Trying to pick up VISUAL CLUES that the attacker will move into range shortly so that I can react instantaneously-Setting the attacker up and landing an Attack.

    ADDING VISUAL TRAINING TO DRILLS: Next I tried to see if I already practised this sequence of techniques in one of my Knive & Stick Drills/Katas including the Set Up techniques. Then extracting that piece in the sequence to train it in a small drill. Or simply create a short Drill if I did not recognize the techniques.

    PRESSURE TESTING: The next time I Sparred I would be on the lookout for the Cues-Facing the same/different opponent. If I did I would attempt to set up the attacker using the same techniques I used the last time and then try and land the same Stab/Slash in my attack. If I was successful I knew I had found something that worked that I could add to my toolbox.
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    249
    I would continue to test this sequence out on the same opponents. Knowing that if I was able to still land the techniques I could go to the them repeatedly. Or if I was able to land the techniques every time I changed Sparring Partners I had a new Shoot & Forget Attack.

    I would create short CHECKLISTS for these "Katas" and name them. So when I approach my Sparring Partners/moving into Condition Orange on the street I am able to recall them instantly.

    I don`t add more than 2 points to a Checklist so that I don`t give myself to many things to think about-Better able to pick up Cues instead of trying to remember a whole string of techniques.

    TWO EXAMPLES: Shoot & Forget Techniques-Techniques I am only able to land once-Face Jab: When somebody faces me for the first time they lean forwards bringing their face & throat within range. After I land the Jab they simply straighten their posture and the target is out of range.

    Facing Taller Opponents: (a) Extent my guard slightly so the attacker can`t slide into range, using their longer legs & reach to attack me before I can react. Pushing the Blade forward a little forces them to work harder to get past my Guard. (b) If the attacker steps back out of range looking for an opening to attack I use Abaniko so the attacker cannot raise on his toes and then smash an attack down on top of my head.

    NO PHYSICAL TRAINING: Periodically I will run these Short Lists through my mind if I have a couple of min. of idle time. Trying to recall them instantly and making sure that I can visualize the techniques and cues clearly.

    If I am able to do this I will try and shorten the Checklist to only a single point and see if am still able to recall it instantly now that the sequence has changed-Does it still make sense-Or do I have to think harder to recall it in an instant.

    FOOTNOTE: I have to be a Counter Fighter waiting for the attacker to move into cutting range. If I attacker first the attacker will simply just wait outside of my range and attack the opening I just left/Waiting for my arms to come to a stop. If the attacker wants to attack he has to move into range first. Giving me a target.

    Cheers
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    68
    I was always taught that in kata both the physical and the mental are intertwined. In some cases visualization cues where supplied as when working with the Wing Chun dummy. However visualizing in the minds eye prior to performing a task is a tried and true technique of elite performers. So I would say kata can be performed as a mental exercise but at some point the rubber has to meet the road.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •