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Thread: 22LR

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    2,190
    Practice is as good as you make it.

    My 10/22 is set up like an M1A.
    1" GI web sling using an M14 front sling swivel and an M1917 rear sling swivel.
    Tech Sights.
    Magazines that are only 10 round, but stick down out of the bottom of the stock, and have a magazine catch actuator on the back of the magazine. You grab the magazine, squeeze/push on the button/lever on the back of it and that pushes the magazine catch in the bottom/rear of the magazine well.

    Mine should probably have a scope on it these days as iron sights are no longer easy to see/use.

    Recoil? Does recoil, when using a good sling supported firing position, really cause you any issues? If I stop to think about it, I notice the recoil. If I'm shooting and really doing the shooting "thing" I don't pay attention to the recoil. The scope bounces, the cross hairs come back down on the target, I inhale, I release the trigger to reset, I exhale and the trigger squeeze happens again. If you can't "build" a good sling supported firing position then yes, recoil can move you off the target and screw with your position. I'm talking M1A, M1 Garand, AR15 recoil. That dog gone 03A4 works my shoulder over. Even then I'm more conscious of the burning on my support elbow than I am on my right shoulder, after 20 rounds or so. Last time I shot it I was beginning to wonder about tossing the elbow pads onto the back of the shooting mat and trying my elbow just bare on the mat (could have been worse than no elbow pads).

    Shooting a .22 is really no different than shooting a centerfire rifle. Unless the recoil and noise "bother" you. Then shooting a .22 should be even more pleasant.

    Ever hear/read about Sam Woodfill? About the engagement/fight that resulted in him being awarded the CMOH? How he stalked German machine gunners/infantrymen through the woods/small town that day and head shot some of them, offhand, at distances up to 200 yds.? The didn't even know he was there. He stalked them, shot them, and moved on to stalk/kill more of them.

    Every time I remember that story I think about my grandpa (also a WW1 veteran) and the story my dad would tell about him and his bolt action Western Field single shot .22. My grandpa walked out of the house one day with that iron sighted .22 and seven .22 shells in his pocket. He came home later that afternoon with 4 squirrels, 2 cotton tail rabbits and 1 ruffed grouse. All head shots. Stalking through the woods, identifying your target, moving close enough to take the shot - off hand. Making head shots.

    .22's used right, can be good practice for technique.

    My only .22/centerfire scoped pair are my SIG 556R and SIG 522. Both have the same 1X4 Bushnell 7.62 BDC reticle scopes on them, so practice feels the same (except for recoil/noise.)

  2. #12
    Thanks for the feedback. I have a bull barreled 10/22 with a lot of Clark parts. I had a 4x12 Leupold on it, but I moved it to a recently purchased good air rifle. (Yes, Edel, a tad ahead there.) the HW97 22 air rifle looks like it will be a good companion to the VXI. So, I thought I might up the glass on the 10/22. (Building pellet trap now.)

    I use the 22s for hunting and off hand range practice. It's just cheaper - but the gun must be accurate as your center fire or you are wasting time.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    6,965
    A few years ago I ran into a couple of weirdos at my local range. They were nice guys, and clearly very smart. I call them weirdos solely because they were shooting .22LR at 300 yards. I had to do a double-take at first, because I thought I was seeing things. But they were indeed getting hits. Their set-ups were very specialized--the scopes had a lot of vertical adjustment and the bases had a significant off-set. The barrel had to be angled up so much that it was almost like shooting artillery. If you lowered your muzzle enough to hit a target at 25y, your view through the scope would be dirt. I left with no desire to do such a thing, but still with a newfound respect for the little rimfire.

    A gun like that has very little training value, but it could have other applications. I found it intriguing that the .22LR was capable of consistent hits at such extreme range. The exceptional stealth of the rimfire has caused me to contemplate its value in urban environments. As a training tool, I no longer find the .22 to be of such great value--though it clearly has some value. But it has other advantages that cause me to keep it around.
    Virtute et Armis

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Richmond, VA
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    2,190
    Seems I remember reading that the British did some testing during the early part of WW2, when they were expecting an imminent invasion, and found the .22 rim fire would penetrate German Uniforms and go deep enough to create wounds that could put enemy soldiers out of action - out to 200 yds.

    As far as killing with a .22 goes. I used to know an old guy who could stalk/shoot white tails with his .22 revolver. He would shoot them in the ear while their head was down and they were feeding through the leaves for acorns. He told me those bucks dropped faster/harder than any deer he ever killed with a 12 ga. slug through the chest.

    He had to get fairly close, but, when you're good, you're good. I've had deer walk up on me pretty close, but I've never been able to sneak up on them that close.

    Artillery like trajectory. I believe I remember reading, years ago, that in the 1890's the best shots of the day could put 10 rifle rounds into a 12" circle at 1000 yds., with black powder cartridge rifles. Mid range trajectory for some of those bullets was 55 ft. above line of sight. Fifty-five feet. Gotta know your stuff (range estimation, wind reading, rifle/cartridge and your ability).

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    2,399
    Not sniping, per se, but I have a little Browning semi-auto that shoots .22 shorts. I can open the back door and shoot rabbits from inside the house, and the neighbors never hear a thing.
    Waitin' for a squeeze...

    TWOTU Since March 2012

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  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Made it to Free America
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    13,308
    Quote Originally Posted by 45Smashemflat View Post
    Thanks for the feedback. I have a bull barreled 10/22 with a lot of Clark parts. I had a 4x12 Leupold on it, but I moved it to a recently purchased good air rifle. (Yes, Edel, a tad ahead there.) the HW97 22 air rifle looks like it will be a good companion to the VXI. So, I thought I might up the glass on the 10/22. (Building pellet trap now.)

    I use the 22s for hunting and off hand range practice. It's just cheaper - but the gun must be accurate as your center fire or you are wasting time.
    Be careful using a rifle scope on a airgun. I don't know if its still true; but I was told that because of an airguns "reverse" recoil that they destroyed even the best rifle scopes and only airgun scopes should be used. I assume the physics hasn't changed; not sure about traditional rifle scopes are up to it?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    NWFL
    Posts
    14,559
    Quote Originally Posted by EDELWEISS View Post
    Be careful using a rifle scope on a airgun. I don't know if its still true; but I was told that because of an airguns "reverse" recoil that they destroyed even the best rifle scopes and only airgun scopes should be used. I assume the physics hasn't changed; not sure about traditional rifle scopes are up to it?
    That warning is for the spring powered guns as I recall. The pre-charged airguns do not have that forward recoil issue. Some semi-auto rifles also tend to jump forward a bit as the bolt slams shut like in the AKs. I do not know how they are on scopes, but likely scopes are better made now days.
    One who hammers his gun into a plow plows for those who do not....Unknown
    ...at the end of the day its not about anything else but YOU AND YOURS..... Gabe Suarez
    ....WANT not NEED is what America is all about. ..... Gabe Suarez
    Its not about how fast you can load, but about how well you can shoot ..... Someone being saved by a speed load is not something that has happened with any regularity. Gabe Suarez

  8. #18
    The scope rules for springers are still in force. You need scope mounts with stop pins, and a scope designed for it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    373
    I'm shooting a near stock 10-22 topped with a 20 MOA base and a SWFA 10X scope. SWFA makes decent scope for the price. A 12" gong at 200 yards is child's play with this set up, and I plan to stretch it out to 300 yards once I get time to refine the set up and try different brands of ammo to see which one shoots more accurately at longer ranges. I haven't found any Wolf 22 locally, but Aquila ammo is readily available and it seems to shoot pretty well. I recently bought a variety of high velocity ammo for shooting at longer ranges, but haven't had time to shoot any of it for accuracy.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    7,982
    I live on a farm. My chicken yard is about 100 yards -to center, it gets important at 75 and 140 -- 60 grain subsonics drop like a rock but they are not much louder than clapping your hands in a rifle barrel.

    I have multiple "shoot out windows" No screens. Before the wife split if I got a beep from the chicken yard motion sensor at night. I looked and waited. I could fire the gun with the barrel out of the window and never wake her.

    Loud ghetto street with blaring rap, a body stack could occur before anyone but the pickpockets knew Polish kids were dropping.

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