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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Palmer, Alaska
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    6,909
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    No special alarms or security on our issue rigs.
    And yet I'm betting that's still not enough to entice you to move to Baltimore.

    From the perspective of someone on the outside looking in, I prefer the model in Papa's department rather than the dedicated SWAT team. Some departments are large enough to have a dedicated unit for proactive warrant service. But for reactive scenarios, I see little value in having a superior force back at the station lifting weights and drinking smoothies. 99.9% of all problems will either be solved--or not--by the patrolman who arrives first on scene.
    Virtute et Armis

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Made it to Free America
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    12,991
    Quote Originally Posted by LawDog View Post
    …..I prefer the model in Papa's department rather than the dedicated SWAT team. Some departments are large enough to have a dedicated unit for proactive warrant service. But for reactive scenarios, I see little value in having a superior force back at the station lifting weights and drinking smoothies. 99.9% of all problems will either be solved--or not--by the patrolman who arrives first on scene.
    Absolutely. Ive waited up to two hours for SWAT to move in. An hour of that was waiting for them all to arrive. Lemme be real clear I respect their abilities but I really question their practical usefulness with a two hour delay.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,017
    Quote Originally Posted by LawDog View Post
    And yet I'm betting that's still not enough to entice you to move to Baltimore.

    From the perspective of someone on the outside looking in, I prefer the model in Papa's department rather than the dedicated SWAT team. Some departments are large enough to have a dedicated unit for proactive warrant service. But for reactive scenarios, I see little value in having a superior force back at the station lifting weights and drinking smoothies. 99.9% of all problems will either be solved--or not--by the patrolman who arrives first on scene.
    1. Tempting, but--nah.
    2. The added benefit of our system is that almost every shift and crew has current or former SWAT deputies on the roster. The skillset is sometimes rusty, but still useful.
    3. Edel's post about delay is right on. Even if SWAT responds, and that's all I'll say about that for now, it takes awhile to assemble the big wing, and sometimes it's just you and your wingman.

    Tallyho!
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    2, 2, 11. And a wakeup.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Dayton Ohio
    Posts
    558
    A friend of mine from Church had been with the Ohio Highway Patrol for a number of years. They were issued recycled military M16's for patrol use. He stated that the patrol replaced the full auto triggers with semi auto triggers. Most were fairly old, IE: Nam generation.

    I have not heard if they upgraded.
    My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.
    - Thomas Jefferson

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Made it to Free America
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    12,991
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ1 View Post
    A friend of mine from Church had been with the Ohio Highway Patrol for a number of years. They were issued recycled military M16's for patrol use. He stated that the patrol replaced the full auto triggers with semi auto triggers. Most were fairly old, IE: Nam generation.

    I have not heard if they upgraded.
    That's pretty much the way most departments got into patrol rifles back in the late 90s. They were purchased/loaned/leased from the military and issued to the officers after being mod-ed for semi only. Theres nothing wrong with a M16a1, there are better options; but if its a choice between a M16a1 and nothing else, then I take a M16a1.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,017
    A local agency is still using them for patrol duty.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    2, 2, 11. And a wakeup.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    NWFL
    Posts
    13,617
    Quote Originally Posted by EDELWEISS View Post
    That's pretty much the way most departments got into patrol rifles back in the late 90s. They were purchased/loaned/leased from the military and issued to the officers after being mod-ed for semi only. Theres nothing wrong with a M16a1, there are better options; but if its a choice between a M16a1 and nothing else, then I take a M16a1.
    The A1s have a longer barrel and fewer receiver options for mounting optics, but otherwise they are good to go.
    One who hammers his gun into a plow plows for those who do not....Unknown
    ...at the end of the day its not about anything else but YOU AND YOURS..... Gabe Suarez
    ....WANT not NEED is what America is all about. ..... Gabe Suarez
    Its not about how fast you can load, but about how well you can shoot ..... Someone being saved by a speed load is not something that has happened with any regularity. Gabe Suarez

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