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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In the hills of Deseret
    Posts
    379
    Quote Originally Posted by M1A's r Best View Post
    I've used a Lansky kit since the early 80's. At the start of hunting season I'd look funny as hell. Patches of hair missing off my arms/legs where I'd be checking knives through the sharpening process. Set the angle, get the angle on the blade, work your way up through the stones and sharpen/polish till you get it where you want it.

    Some people don't like the Lansky kit. Okay.

    My buddy used mine (in college) and bought one of his own. Within a few weeks he was making money sharpening knives for other hunters in the dorm. I walked into his room one day and he's on the bed with his right hand stuck up in the corner all covered with white gauze. I asked him what the hell he'd done and he told me he'd slipped while sharpening a knife and cut his thumb the night before. He had to keep his hand up in the air/elevated in order to keep it from throbbing so bad.

    He'd gotten to the emergency room at the hospital (about 3 blocks from the dorm) and a doctor had looked at his thumb and taken care of it. The doctor cleaned it up (still bleeding badly) and had to put 3 stitches inside before closing it up with 4 stitches on the outside. The doctor asked him what he'd cut himself with and he told him it was a hunting knife. The doctor didn't believe him. Told him it looked like a scalpel cut and knives just weren't that sharp/clean (the cut through the meat). My buddy pulled his pocket knife out and handed it to the doctor and told him to have a look at it. He said the doctor opened it up, felt the blade, sliced some gauze with it and whistled. Then he wanted to know how my buddy got his knives so sharp.

    He told my buddy a cut from a very sharp knife/scalpel is worse than a cut from a dull knife because it makes it harder to heal. A clean cut doesn't have a lot of ragged little bumps/tears to mesh back together quicker in the healing process. I'm hoping I remember that right (after almost 40 years).

    Those days of sharpening knives for people led me to some likes/dislikes of popular knives based on how hard it was to put an angle/edge on some and how long the edge lasted vs. other brands.
    The Lansky works fine, especially for the price. You can put some scary edges on a knife with one. It has some issues, but they can usually be addressed with minimal fuss. I still have mine as a car kit sharpener, but have moved to a KME sharpener that pretty much fixes the annoying bits that the Lanksy still has, and you can do convex edges with a KME. Of course, it costs five times as much as the Lansky, but it was worth the money, IMHO.
    __________________________________________________ ___________________________________________
    Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered. Yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap we esteem too lightly.

    -Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Southeast United States
    Posts
    591
    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Rat View Post
    Yeah, he takes those bevels down to some seriously thin levels. Makes sense that he's want surgical precision, given that he's a surgeon. I usually find the factory bevels perfect for me, though. I think I'm at 19 or 20 Bark River-made knives now. They're good blades.

    What model did you get?
    A Bravo 1. An old army buddy gave it to me when I retired a couple of years ago. I kinda got him interested in blades that you don't buy in the PX and he's now got the bug. The Bravo 1 is pretty sweet, a stout beast with its full thick tang. The grip, olive green canvas micarta, is right on for my hand. I'm gonna take down the thumb ramp a bit and soften the jimping a little. Because it's a gift I've kinda babied it, but I see it getting stained and scarred up as time goes on, so I'll probably cold blue it like my other carbon steel knives. I'd carry it -- and use it -- more often, but I need to make a kydex sheath for it ... the original leather one is too beautiful, too nice and a bit too traditional.

    I had my eye on a smaller, daily carry blade, the Aurora Mini, in a fancier steel, but while saving up my $$ they've all disappeared. You snooze you lose. One of these days ....
    Last edited by Redneck Zen; 08-09-2018 at 06:17 PM.
    Redneck Zen
    "Be careful what you get good at."

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In the hills of Deseret
    Posts
    379
    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Zen View Post
    A Bravo 1. An old army buddy gave it to me when I retired a couple of years ago. I kinda got him interested in blades that you don't buy in PX and he's now got the bug. The Bravo 1 is pretty sweet, a stout beast with its full thick tang. The grip, olive green canvas micarta, is right on for my hand. I'm gonna take down the thumb ramp a bit and soften the jimping a little. Because it's a gift I've kinda babied it, but I see it getting stained and scarred up as time goes on, so I'll probably cold blue it like my other carbon steel knives. I'd carry it -- and use it -- more often, but I need to make a kydex sheath for it ... the original leather one is too beautiful, too nice and a bit too traditional.

    I had my eye on a smaller, daily carry blade, the Aurora Mini, in a fancier steel, but while saving up my $$ they've all disappeared. You snooze you lose. One of these days ....
    Excellent blade. Sounds familiar too. Can't beat a Bravo 1.

    20228570_1716598835021394_2243958955724245644_n.jpg
    __________________________________________________ ___________________________________________
    Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered. Yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap we esteem too lightly.

    -Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    834
    I have been using a lansky system for probably 25 years as well. As a matter of fact I was using it yesterday and have a couple of more knives to finish today.

    I did cave in a couple of years ago and bought a Ken onion work sharp. It is really nice but you can't ruin a knife in a hurry if you are not careful.

    I also have 1 bravo 1. I love that knife. I did find someone online who made a kydex sheath for it. I will have to dig that up and posted it.

    Later.
    "Play stupid games, win stupid prizes" Alan Temby
    "Give a man a mask and he will tell you the truth"- Oscar Wilde.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    San Marcos, TX
    Posts
    950
    I use the Wicked Sharp system. More setup than the Lansky but I think itís easier to maintain the angle and has more grits including leather strops and paste. It also doesnít do convex.

  6. #16
    The only system I have ever used is a Spyderco Sharpmaker. I think I am a couple of sigmas on the wrong side of the bell curve as far as manual dexterity is concerned, and this works a lot better for me than trying to free hand sharpen. But i've never gotten anywhere close to literal hair-popping levels of sharp. So here's the question -- are any of these other systems a better bet, or do I just need to shut up and keep on doing the work?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    438
    I am no expert, YMMV.

    When I was at the ABS school in the 1990s, James Crowell (ABS Master Smith) sharpened an unfinished 9" blade on 320 grit 2'' x 72'' Bader belt Grinder, stropped the edge on the palm of his hand and handed it to me to cut 1 1/4" natural fiber rope.
    I was able to easily cut the hanging rope on a downward diagonal. I the tried an upward back hand diagonal and that cut through as well. This led me to believe that for many purposes 320-400 grit is a fine enough edge.
    I have finished edges much more finely but there seems to be a diminishing return.
    Wood carving, planing,chiseling seems to need a more polished edge than slicing flesh or webbing.

    Using a felt tip marker to mark where you are going to sharpen lets you know where you are actually removing metal, Mechanics Illustrated circa 1960-70.

    Bevel type and angle affect cutting a lot. I like the Moran type edges on a lot of the Bark River Knives.

    Axes and straight razors have different bevels and purposes. What are you cutting, under what conditions ? Thinner has less drag but is more fragile.

    Hollow grind cuts well up to where the blade thickens, the ridge where it thickens is a real drag point when trying a through cut. On the other hand with a narrow thick dagger a hollow grind edge can be sharp while the blade has a thick spine for rigidity in a stab.


    I have:
    Bader 2 hp variable speed 2'' x 72'' belt grinders,
    Arkansas stones, Sort, hard, and surgical black, crock sticks etc...
    Japanese water stones,
    Diamond stones,
    Edge Pro ( lansky on nitrous)
    Norton 3 stone oil bath set,
    Tormek sharpener.


    Mostly I use the Edge pro or the Bader. I like the Moran convex bevel or a flat grind with a 20-22 degree secondary bevel.

    As pack sharpeners:
    The 2 sided DMT diamond, bali song type, folding sharpeners work well. Black/extra course, Blue/course, red/fine, green/extra fine.
    The blue/red is a good general use combo, if you have more space having both the black/blue and the red/green is great. Black can do rough reprofiling.

    On my 4" blade knives I expect to take the cardboard tube, from a roll of paper towels or toilet paper, put it on the edge of a table and sever it cleanly with 1 downward diagonal cut.
    Last edited by cmcampbell; 09-03-2018 at 06:56 PM.

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