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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    1,439

    Default Forcing cone lengthening worth it?

    I know that getting a shotgun barrel forcing cone reamed out to a more gradual taper is a common enough modification among the clay sports guys. From what I'm told by guys deep into those games it improves pattern uniformity. In some cases quite a bit. The theory being that the shot deforms less, so the pattern improves. By improving I'm told that pattern size isn't effected but pattern density is. Same spread, less empty space.

    Now, bird and clay is a whole different thing from fighting. That said a better pattern is a better pattern. Have any of you guys shot buckshot through a barrel with a lengthened cone? Is there a noticeable improvement? Is the benefit only tangible with the fine shot they use, or does buckshot pattern improve? Is the proverbial juice worth the squeeze?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
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    We looked at it. It does nothing but increase cost.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    1
    Old trick us old-timers did was cut down a 32" or 30", barrel which would cut off a fixed choke , and back bore or more commonly known as choke boring the barrel. It was mainly used before screw in chokes, but still used with the trap and skeet shooters along with choke tubes. You basically used the barrel as a choke. Gabe is correct, don't waste your money, put it towards ammo and practice !!!! P.S. and his cool shit

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    118
    As cheap as Flite Control is, I don't see the point, even if it did help. The other aspect is that Flite Control has very high quality components and QA/QC, and the unique wad allows storage of loaded weapons without the shells "mushrooming". In short, the drawbacks of shitty ammo outweigh the price advantage, and negate the forcing cone work.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    2,063
    I ran into an old guy (selling lots of shotguns) at a recent gun show who told me the reason my Win. M97 kicks so hard is because of the forcing cone.

    I made the comment that nothing that heavy should kick that hard (kicks worse than my lighter Ithaca M37). He said it's the forcing cone. He said the older shotguns made during the time of the paper shotgun shells had a shorter/sharper forcing cone angle. This was due to the short rolled over paper crimp style and the lack of wad/sleeve combo in those days. He told me that properly reaming/lengthening the forcing cone area would result in reduced recoil.

    I can't say he doesn't know what he's talking about but I didn't mention that my M97 was made in 1957 (last or next to last year they were made, if I remember correctly) and my Win. M12 and a couple of my Ithaca M37's, as well as my Auto 5 are pre WW2 guns and do not kick nearly as hard as that newer M97. Made me wonder about his forcing cone theory/statements.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    7,095
    Quote Originally Posted by M1A's r Best View Post
    I ran into an old guy (selling lots of shotguns) at a recent gun show who told me the reason my Win. M97 kicks so hard is because of the forcing cone.

    I made the comment that nothing that heavy should kick that hard (kicks worse than my lighter Ithaca M37). He said it's the forcing cone. He said the older shotguns made during the time of the paper shotgun shells had a shorter/sharper forcing cone angle. This was due to the short rolled over paper crimp style and the lack of wad/sleeve combo in those days. He told me that properly reaming/lengthening the forcing cone area would result in reduced recoil.

    I can't say he doesn't know what he's talking about but I didn't mention that my M97 was made in 1957 (last or next to last year they were made, if I remember correctly) and my Win. M12 and a couple of my Ithaca M37's, as well as my Auto 5 are pre WW2 guns and do not kick nearly as hard as that newer M97. Made me wonder about his forcing cone theory/statements.
    Indeed. Its only useful on older shotguns. Anymore modern ones take it into account and there isn't much to be gained from it.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,665
    Spend the money on ammo - find which ammo results in the best pattern for your needs.

    Personally I want a wider pattern that is consistent.

    The flite control stuff is cool but in our testing the pattern was essentially a single hole out to 25 yards. I can see how that would be useful for a longer shot, but for most scenarios I imagine using the shotgun, I want a bigger pattern up close.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    118
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Spend the money on ammo - find which ammo results in the best pattern for your needs.

    Personally I want a wider pattern that is consistent.

    The flite control stuff is cool but in our testing the pattern was essentially a single hole out to 25 yards. I can see how that would be useful for a longer shot, but for most scenarios I imagine using the shotgun, I want a bigger pattern up close.
    I have had very good luck with Winchester Ranger doing what you want. For me, Flite Control provides roughly 8-12" patterns at 25 yards.

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