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Thread: Retro sniper

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    NJ
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    57
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    So, what do you shoot with #2? Lincoln Continentals?
    Nope... it’s just used to make it look like I do (patsy).

    Got it in a decent deal, back when I first started to like the Carcano action (magazine system, not so much). The guy who built it really spent some time getting it right. I’ve seen some other reproductions of Oswald’s rifle, and this one is pretty damn close to the one in evidence. There is a tiny difference in the scope due to changes in production (the one on mine is newer, I believe), but mount and sling are identical. Even the rifle was produced with a few months of Oswald’s.

    I got questions when I brought it home... as why would I buy it? To me, it is a part of history that shaped our country. Vietnam would have been very different, Nixon might have been president earlier or not at all. Even just move away from the historical significance of that assassination, it is something that is still argued up through today. Might not be as valuable to my Custer-era Springfield Trapdoor Carbine, but it definitely strikes up a conversation here/there.

    To be honest, out of the few people that I shoot with that felt there was a conspiracy, all changed their view after handling the rifle. Being under 100 yards, with an offset scope which allowed use of irons, it moves away from it being an impossible shot to something a decent shooter could pull off. Considering Oswald was 24, and a former Marine, I feel he was capable of connecting.

    Don’t want to skew this thread that far (touchy subject, and people can believe whatever they choose), but a lot of people always say how hard of a shot it is to replicate, even though people have done it. To copy Oswald’s shot, especially the one that connected Kennedy and Connally, is extremely hard to do. If you are off by a hair, you didn’t do it. For some guy in a building, back in 1963, who was looking down at a car with a specific target, as long as he hit Kennedy... it was a win for him.

    And to bring it back to the OP, another author to look at is Peter Senich. He did The Complete Book of US Sniping, as well as a similar book that just talked about the USMC (US Marine Corps Scout-Sniper).

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Made it to Free America
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    13,097
    Theres NO Doubt that the VietNam and even earlier WW2/Korean scopes and rifles are primitive by todays standards, heck they should be; but they do still work, at least in the sense that a Colt SAA will still kill. As for the numbers of kills attributed to WW2 snipers; I think part of that is limited history of snipers being a viable tool in combat (especially urban combat). Today we've heard about snipers, hell every third guy that comes into a gun shop thinks hes a sniper because he hit a pop up target at 50m....

    What intrigues me about the retro scopes (especially the Redfield and ART) is they work without any electronics or batteries. The Hi-Lux Redfield even updated the range scale from the original plastic (which had a tendency to melt in VietNam) to an etched glass scale. I do wish the ART had continued to stay with the external cams, as it was just damn cool to watch the mount move and think that a target was now able to be hit at 600m without any math or holdover from me (the shooter)--you cant do that with a MilDot. The ART isn't fast (actually its not really slow--just adjust the zoom to bracket the beltline to shoulder of the target); but it doesn't require any math or any computations of the range. The scope/mount does all of that.

    The main "problems" with the ART and Redfield are that they are LOW powered by modern standards. Today a scope that max's out at 9x is almost a joke for long range shooting, especially when target ID is more than just kill those guys over there....

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    2,235
    Quote Originally Posted by Screwball View Post
    To me, it is a part of history that shaped our country. Vietnam would have been very different, Nixon might have been president earlier or not at all. Even just move away from the historical significance of that assassination, it is something that is still argued up through today. Might not be as valuable to my Custer-era Springfield Trapdoor Carbine, but it definitely strikes up a conversation here/there.
    Yeah. The word "iconic" is overused, but:

    OGUN.jpg

    Iconic.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    2, 0, 10. And a wakeup.

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