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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Suburb of Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    1,155
    Suarez International Staff Instructor, Iowa

    "EVERY MAN IS A COUNTER TERRORIST." --Gabe Suarez
    "It's not the will to win that matters--everyone has that. It's the will to prepare to win that matters." --Paul "Bear" Bryant
    "Love of theory is the root of all evil." --William M. Briggs

    Formerly "ericmt"

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    The Republic of Pirates
    Posts
    43,536
    Here is the thing - if you have been wrestling and boxing and lifting since you were five years old, please don't think you are typical and don't mislead those who are not like you. If you are coming to this as an adult man...a breakable and hard to mend adult man, I suggest you consider nature and reality.

    In your mind you can join a UFC-centric cage fighting gym and start lessons. Nature and reality say that if you are over 35, and not a freak of nature, you will break sooner rather than later. Same for wrestling and many other full contact systems. I started full contact karate when I was ten. At twelve, in front of and much to the horror of my spectator mother, I had my nose splattered by a knee. Kyokushin, the way I trained it was physically brutal. By the time I reached black belt level at sixteen I had had a broken nose, several broken toes and ribs, and a broken finger or two. But I could take a punch and give one back like nobody's business and was not afraid of feeling or delivering pain. And that has carried to my later life as well. You are not going to get there in six months of cardio krav maga, no matter how much the IDF says that you will.

    In the quest I would tell you that physical fitness is the most important thing. Being able to physically pick up another man against his will and throw him off a roof to his death makes up for alot of technical flaws. None of the founders of Karate were weak or feeble...nor the American GIs that brought it to the USA. And if a lineage was kept intact and a combat focus was kept in place...and the memory of combat kept alive, then a combat system will have remained in place. But that is not done by the weak or the feeble or the slovenly.

    Think of what we do here. Let's say for a contact weapon attack at ten feet away (just outside of hand to hand range). Our strategy for a contact weapon attack, assuming we are armed with a projectile weapon (pistol) is to maintain the distance while we draw and shoot the attacker to the ground. The tactic for doing that is the take off footwork to the 5 o'clock and 7 o' clock lines. So we train that tactic hundreds of time alone without any pressure and without any opponent until we understand how to physically execute the movements. Then we bring in a training partner and with minimal pressure, we drill the technique that supports our strategy in context of application an equal number of times. Once we have a contextual understanding, we turn up the pressure in force on force exercises. This brings physical memorization, understanding of context and combat application. It is what we do and have done for nearly fifteen years with so many combat victories that I can scarcely keep track. Most recently one of our own staff.

    That preceding explanation is, in a word, Karate. That is how its done. That is the context. We can do it that way, or you can go join a ghetto police department, work nights and get assigned to gang enforcement and see what you can do about learning on the job...in a real context. Go to it...its not hard...specially today when so few want to be cops. Go to it and report back...if you make it. OR...or, you can take a safer and quite combat proven and effective approach...like I described our methodolgy.

    Now imagine using that same (and relatively safe) method for any surprise attack you may be faced with. Not an equally paired match, but a sucker punch...and attempted take down, whatever. Human movement is human movement and it has been the same for hundreds of years. Imagine having an understanding of aggressive human movement...and internal and deep understanding. And then having an ingrained reflexive response for those aggressive human movements so that your chances of surviving that unexpected contact were extremely high. And not only that, but that through extensive repetition and contextual learning, you would have a quick and mindless counter to those aggressions that could be put into place instantly? That would be cool. That is what we do with the gun, and that is what karate - the proper karate - does with the fist.
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    231
    I posted this in another Karate thread but its worth repeating. A book called Working with Warriors details three UK Karate students who become bouncers and use their Karate skills at the door in the 1960s and 1970s. A good read about "real" Karate in action. The author, Dennis Martin, eventually evolved away from Karate, but I think it can be argued he developed the fighting skills, toughness and other attributes necessary to win fights from his traditional Karate training.

    https://www.amazon.com/Working-Warri...+with+warriors

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Ft. Riley, KS
    Posts
    1,031
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    Did you see the comment on deselecting competitio-based systems? And the one about philosophy-based spiritual systems?

    Street Karate will defeat sport BJJ, just as street BJJ will defeat sport Karate.
    Krav? Simplified Jewish karate
    Kali/FMA? Trained it. Basically Filipino Karate with a few knives and different cultural overtones.
    MMA? More physical karate and BJJ for young guys
    Systema? Aikido? Kung Fu? Ninjutsu? Please
    Boxing? See the comment on deselecting competition-based systems
    Wrestling? See the comment on deselecting competition-based systems
    WW2 H2H? Americanized irreverant Karate.

    Is there some secret 'pure' discipline system I missed?
    I'm not disagreeing per se, but there's a lot to be said for any system that allows you to safely spar full out. No matter what, you're making a compromise somewhere... Either in your sparring or in your tools available.


    "If you find yourself in a fair fight you failed to properly prepare..."

    "History is the autobiography of a madman..."

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    3,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Blade Doc View Post
    I posted this in another Karate thread but its worth repeating. A book called Working with Warriors details three UK Karate students who become bouncers and use their Karate skills at the door in the 1960s and 1970s. A good read about "real" Karate in action. The author, Dennis Martin, eventually evolved away from Karate, but I think it can be argued he developed the fighting skills, toughness and other attributes necessary to win fights from his traditional Karate training.

    https://www.amazon.com/Working-Warri...+with+warriors
    Years ago he used to come on this forum.

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