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  1. #21
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    I think it is a good time to discuss this and it will be a series of upcoming articles. I do think gynmastic karate is stupid and yes I would ell a karate gynmast that what he is doing does a disservice to everyone...that instead they should focus on gymnastics floor exercises and stop playing Jackie Chan in the movies. I am old and I can tell someone they are fucked up and not care if they are offended...and if they are a good unimpressive roundhouse to their leg will unoffend them. There...its out. I expect all manner of gymkata ninjas to come and kill me tonight. I will keep an eye open when I sleep.

    A kata is a system of training and hard wiring combat proven techniques in solo training so that when the stimulus of attack is presented, the exponent of kata training will respond without thought or analysis. You are not going to get that from wanting to be that good, but you will from training that way. Nor is incessant sparing the answer as it will become a contest based on agreed upon rules and not representative of the real world. Kata training, followed by cooperative training of the methods shown will get you there faster. Then tested via high pressure full dedication drills and you will develop into a very hard and skilled fighter. That is why we are developing the pistol kata and why we have integrated them into the force on force curriculum. If you do not understand kata, with hold your comments until you do.

    Simply knowing movement is not enough. Picture a chinese opera singer giving a full and perfect rendition of the Star Spangled Banner. He knows how to make the sounds correctly, but doesn't speak english. The song may be technically right, but to the singer it represents nothing...it means nothing. That is what a superficial kata looks like and why a thorough training into what the moves represent is of paramount importance. So the man executing has context and understanding..

    I see the martial gymnast disease like I see the competition centric shooters who think they are gunfighters because they won a match somewhere and have a CCW.

    Look at these kata. They would get a sneer from the martial gymnasts, but the old guys in the video would kill the gymnasts, take their car keys and drive off in their rides.

    Fighting, whether armed or unarmed is a bout killing the other guy. Any added philosophies or decorations are not necessary and stupid.

    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #22
    Shannon Hogan's Avatar
    Shannon Hogan is offline Suarez International Affiliate - Salt Lake City
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    Regardless the girl is cute. Motivated and should be steered to SI for training. Kyokushin prepared me for basic training. The Senior Drill Sargent tried to sucker punch me one time. His fist bounced off my abs as I forcefully exhaled. Not a dent! Pissed the DS off then he proceeded to use my chest and abdomen as his punching bag. Dog tags imprinted! :) Then kicked me out of the mess hall for the usual 50 pushups etc. It was not just the physical training I had developed (I was only a Green Belt) but the mindset that I had been developing from Mas Oyama's philosophy that helped me deal with the controlled beating(s). This was bak in 1975 at Ft. Ord, CA. All of it was educational and has carried me to today along my SI trining!! Love it!
    fulminis instar "Like thunderbolts, fast as lightning."
    Hogan Clan motto.

  3. #23
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    I agree Gabe. I did JKA "karate" for years thinking it was the real thing only to find out it was not really combat oriented. I now do Okinawan which is the real deal. Everything is geared to combat as you and Brent know. I feel the JKA scammed me. Live and learn.
    I am in a sunny place full of shady people

  4. #24
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    So is there a system that IS good for street combat? One that can deal with situations that may be encountered?

    1.) Multiple attackers

    2.) Edged weapons/Impact weapons

    3.) Gun disarms

    4.) Ground fighting/joint locks

    I’m thinking old-school Okinawan Karate, but no one seems to teach that anymore (mostly point-sparring now).

    Seriously looking for a discipline to get my daughter into. The only background I have is my own (high school varsity wrestler, BJJ, MMA, Japanese Jujitsu), but I’d like to get her on a good path from the start. I think establishing good habits from an early age is essential. My instinct in a fight is to take the guy to the ground (it’s where I dominate), but I’m smart enough now to realize that ground fighting can get one killed in a fight on the street with multiple attackers. What system can establish good habit patterns for her from the beginning?
    "We must all suffer one of two things: The pain of discipline, or the pain of regret and disappointment." -Jim Rohn

  5. #25
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    In bold

    Quote Originally Posted by Wiseguy04 View Post
    So is there a system that IS good for street combat? One that can deal with situations that may be encountered?
    There's no one place where you can learn everything. Even at my dojo where we have instructors teaching multiple disciplines, a normal adult doesn't have time to train everything, and no single instructor has the time to teach everything and maintain a life.

    1.) Multiple attackers

    2.) Edged weapons/Impact weapons

    3.) Gun disarms
    Buy the Hands Vs Guns DVD from the gear store. This is pretty simple stuff (not saying it's easy, but it's simple). Don't bother trying to find a school that teaches it, honestly it's just good body mechanics and applying it to someone holding a gun.

    4.) Ground fighting/joint locks

    I’m thinking old-school Okinawan Karate, but no one seems to teach that anymore (mostly point-sparring now).
    There's a guy named Oshiro in CA. Not sure if he's got a branch near you or not. Goju-ryu is also one of the better ones that stays close to the old roots.

    Seriously looking for a discipline to get my daughter into. The only background I have is my own (high school varsity wrestler, BJJ, MMA, Japanese Jujitsu), but I’d like to get her on a good path from the start. I think establishing good habits from an early age is essential. My instinct in a fight is to take the guy to the ground (it’s where I dominate), but I’m smart enough now to realize that ground fighting can get one killed in a fight on the street with multiple attackers. What system can establish good habit patterns for her from the beginning?
    How old is she? I'm assuming she's young. I would start her in Japanese Jujutsu (if you can find it) or Judo (if you can't). It's a lot easier to learn how to fall and get back up when you're young. Also these arts teach you good body mechanics and get you used to dealing with bad breath distance.

    More to say but gotta run.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  6. #26
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    Thanks Brent, I think we’re on the same wavelength. I’m glad I learned break falls at a young age in Japanese Jujitsu. Tends to “bulletproof” you for later in life. She’s only 9, so I’ll probably do the same for her.

    Will definitely look up Oshiro. Thanks for all the tips.
    "We must all suffer one of two things: The pain of discipline, or the pain of regret and disappointment." -Jim Rohn

  7. #27
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    Something that is not competition focused
    Not taught by a fat guy that cant really do anything
    Not filled with secret esoterics

    Something with a lineage. And I think anyone here will be able to see bullcrap for bullcrap.

    But above all...a system that relishes physical strength.
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    Something that is not competition focused
    Not taught by a fat guy that cant really do anything
    Not filled with secret esoterics

    Something with a lineage. And I think anyone here will be able to see bullcrap for bullcrap.

    But above all...a system that relishes physical strength.
    Man, Kajukembo came to mind when reading your comment.


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  9. #29
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    Oct 2010
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    A sister art to kajukembo is American Kenpo. It has its lineage from Chinese karate, but it was modernized for the street. It combines striking and kicking with takedowns, locks and chokes. It is a well rounded practical art and, assuming the teacher is good, would make one a skilled fighter. I am a blue belt in it... working my way up.

  10. #30
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    Wiseguy,

    You likely won't find all this in one place, even if you do, time will be a limiting factor in what you can learn because life happens. The best solution I've found is to focus on learning one art as a base from an instructor who can fight. Once you have a solid foundation, make a plan with blocks of focused training in the other areas, so you can work on a specific skillset while maintaining your core system.

    I'd like to be able to recommend a style to you to make the search easier, but I can't, it comes down to how the material is passed on and your willingness to apply it with enthusiasm when you need to.

    Jim

    ISA 6:8

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