Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,490
    I am not sure what Gabe has in mind for rifle and shotgun classes. But I can tell you that the first two kata are easily adapted to long guns.

    Some modification is necessary due to the handling characteristics versus the pistol. Footwork requires a little tweaking as well. But fundamentally they are the same thing.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    47,783
    We have already adapted both first kata to the Stakeout, and a striking kata for that weapon is in development (working name of "crack the coconut").
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    621
    Fascinating. Not only for the concept, but for the process of creating a kata.

  4. #14
    Question. I know a lot of thought and intention went into this so I must ask. When moving to the 5, the body turns clockwise and faces away from the pyramid. Is there is a reason we are not turning counter clockwise? When performing this I'm finding that turning counter clockwise is more fluid and makes the direction change easier as well.
    Just looking for clarification is all.

    Thanks.
    Be alert, stand firm in the faith, act like a man, be strong. Your every action must be done with love.

    “Adversity introduces a man to himself.”

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,490
    Counterclockwise is not as direct, leaving you on the X longer. Only for a split second, but split seconds count in this environment.

    Of course, I cannot see exactly how you were doing it. If you lead with your left leg, that involves stepping backwards. Sometimes a backward steps necessary but generally we try to avoid that. If you are switching your feet and kicking off with you right, that kind of footwork is covered in Watch your back.

    Also, the rearward angles demonstrate two-handed shooting on the 5 oclock, and one-handed shooting on the 7. Your method would result in only performing one-handed shooting. The kata needs to cover both so each can be done when the need presents itself.

    Each kata Is designed to teach particular things.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  6. #16
    It's easy from my point of view to not see the depth of wisdom that went into this Kata. But I was certain each step and move has a reason behind it.

    Thank you.
    Be alert, stand firm in the faith, act like a man, be strong. Your every action must be done with love.

    “Adversity introduces a man to himself.”

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    47,783
    Brent and I have an extensive Karate background. Mine dates back to 1970. We had this concept cooking for about two years.

    Its easy to design a complicated and flashy kata that has zero combat value. To design one that is simple is hard.

    We will do a pay-to-view video on this soon and there will be free content on what went into develop this concept and apply it as we have.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,490
    Just like weightlifting, kata should develop both sides of the body equally. That is much easier to say than to do. Some kata are perfect mirror images of both sides, but most are not. This is not a bad thing; doing exactly the same thing on both sides can be boring...and people won’t practice that which is boring. Also, kata must have a certain flow, doing exactly the same thing on both sides may be balanced but it doesn’t always “fit”.

    Finally, because we have a weapon in our hands, it necessarily makes things different between left and right. Most of us carry on the right...naturally the kata will be different on left and right sides.

    I think Gabe’s kata Diagonal Lines is perfectly balanced. The footwork is the same on each side, so there is equal development in each angle of movement. You don’t know which way you will have to move when you’re faced woth a reactive situation, so we need to develop ability in all angles...including those that don’t come natural to us. The hands are doing the same thing big picture wise, but details are different - two-handed vs one-handed, while coordinating with body movement as well as eye focus. Body structure is also built into all of these movements. There is a reason why the body is pointing one way or another, a reason for where the hands are in each set.

    I consider Diagonal Lines as the foundation of the Suarez system for reactive movement.

    Watch Your Back is a different theme but it builds on the lessons from Diagonal Lines. It is a supplement, incorporating different footwork and movement that give you different options. Both kata are designed to teach solutions to specific scenarios, but the movement patterns are fundamental and can be applied however you want.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    47,783
    And gunfight training will never be the same again..,
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Posts
    3,513
    Quote Originally Posted by psalms23dad View Post
    Question. I know a lot of thought and intention went into this so I must ask. When moving to the 5, the body turns clockwise and faces away from the pyramid. Is there is a reason we are not turning counter clockwise? When performing this I'm finding that turning counter clockwise is more fluid and makes the direction change easier as well.
    Just looking for clarification is all.

    Thanks.
    If you are going to "turn 5 into 7" meaning running the 5 o'clock angle like the 7 o'clock (which is shooting 1 handed for right handers) you really need a lateral right hand step to get you off the x first and THEN pivot on that right foot and turn the left shoulder back and go. Otherwise you are on the X longer than you want to be.

    Same applies if right handers are trying to turn 7 into 5 and shoot it over their left shoulder with 2 hands on the gun. They need a hard lateral left step first and then pivot and go otherwise they are lingering on the x longer than they really want to.
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor
    NRA Certified Instructor
    Tennessee State Handgun Carry Permit Instructor
    Glock Factory Certified Armorer
    IDPA Master Class SSP, ESP,CDP, CCP, BUG, CO
    Gung Ho Chuan Association

    TRAIN with me....https://suarezinternational.com/sear...h_query=harris

    Fundamentalist Christian Man at Arms

    AKA - CRUEL HAND LUKE

    Joel 3:10 - Beat your plowshares into swords , and your pruning hooks into spears; train even your weaklings to be warriors.

    Through HIS power I can walk on water..IF I just have the faith and courage to get out of the boat.

    A good man who's done a couple of bad things along the way....

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •