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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    279
    Thank you for all the work and thought going into this. Grateful.

    I do hope it will be presented at the Force on Force training in October. Signed up and can’t wait...
    VIRES HONOR VIRTUS FIDES

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    44,986
    Kata will be an integral part of all our future complete force on force classes.

    2018 and 19 will be a big era of change and updates for Suarez International and how we deliver training. I predict some training subindustries will be completely disrupted.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    44,986
    So my POV. First I am so glad we are discussing this and not which 22 derringer is best for Maryland concealed carry. Alright...moving on.

    The importance of this is washed over by those instructors that share those attributes thinking the presence of the gun is sufficient. We have proven time and again in force on force that when you lack the initiative, moving will be the only thing that saves you. We had a man in class who told of an event where moving kept him from being shot by a bad guy...it seemed like the right thing to do and had he not done it, he admitted, he would have died.

    Most gun people lack athleticism, and many have totally forgotten how to move. Many know they need to moeve dynamically, but simply cannot make their bodies do what their minds want. The reason is that the link between mind and body has been severed by a sedentary lifestyle, slothful eating habits and a total lack of physical fitness. All of these are important in the reactive realm. And that fast draw, short split times and great score shot by a Tarn Butler will not matter at all when a thug is pointing in on him from ten feet and has the trigger halfway back.

    And I will say that taking a man whose life is sedentary, whose body has forgotten how to move, who doesn't remember his right foot from his left, is a hard man to teach how to win trhe fight when he doesn't have the initiative.

    Brent and I have been discussing this for over a year. The final answer is the best answer. How did Brent learn to move like he does? How did I? Through kata training. Kata training teaches the body to move where the mind is directing it. And it has taught millions of karateka how to do this and how to win fights on the street against real bad guys. I envision the class of the future being focused on learning a Kata, then learning the applications of the kata, testing those applications via variable pressure drills in force on force, and then returning to the kata to execute it with a complete knowledge of structure and application.

    The kata was first taught the way I prefer...That being the 1:00 and then the 5:00. The execution of the 5:00 ends up with you facing the other way. Then you execute the 11:00 and the 7:00. The two rearward angles, because of their dynamics and footwork needs always end up facing you opposite the original position so it worked well. And the two or three karate trained guys in class got it...but others got hung up on the direction.

    The next day I simplified it and simply had everyone do the 1, 5, 11, and 7 and always turn to face front regardless of where they ended up. That one worked better for the guys to learn. I think that the limited time we spent ofn this in the beginning made teaching the diagonal movements far easier. I wonder what the skill result would be if we had an entire morning to learn the physical movements before testing and proofing them in force on force.

    This is a ground breaking thing we are doing and I believe it will not only help me make better fighters, but it will teach the student far more than just moving off the X. This is an industry changing time.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,597
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon_Spaf View Post
    We also practiced for a while without the reload sequence, which can add another layer of confusion.

    That is what I have been teaching in Karate class, just the lines without the reload sequence. That portion is irrelevant to those guys, but the footwork and takeoff is applicable to anything. I think it makes some sense to start without the reload portion when first learning it.

    When I first saw the kata on WT, I didn't get what the big deal was. Once Gabe explained the concept of moving off the X and the after action sequence, I thought "Woah!!! This is brilliant!" It encapsulates a whole day of training in a single 30-second drill. This will definitely become part of my training routine.
    When we are done, the kata series will encapsulate the whole gun fighting system. The DNA of how we fight will be programmed into it. Much like the kata of old, it will be there for all to see if they only look for it...and work at it.

    For us it is about capturing wisdom and experience and technique in an elegant package. A “simple”, short exercise that encapsulates most of the physical movement that you need. The principles and ideas are also baked into it...it’s not just the What and the How, but also the Why.

    Kata is about capturing That Which Is Important.

    And the real value is in the doing. It’s not enough to “know”a kata. It’s best to understand it, deeply. But if nothing else, practice it. A lot. It will teach your body how to move. Your mind as well for that matter.

    And having done many, many repetitions of this movement, that skill will be there when you need it.

    Of course many won't get it. Which is not a bad thing. But it’s my hope that our students get it and not only use this to make themselves much more dangerous, but also to pass it on.

    I recall my dad teaching me the fundamentals of marksmanship long ago. That was a great start...but imagine if I had just learned one gunfighting kata when I was a kid. How much of a leap that would have been!

    Imagine teaching your kids, and how far they could go.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Washington

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,597
    How far did you guys get through Watch Your Back? How did it go?
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Washington

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    44,986
    I ran out of time and we did the dry and live work, but they got the basics of it. We had a few lightbulbs go off...I could see the faces.

    I strongly believe this will change everything as far as physical standards and take the martial art of the pistol to a new level.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Posts
    145
    I attended the red dot class this past weekend. I do have limited background in Martial arts. I did Moo Duk Kwan in the 80’s while in college. We did do katas and they were very strict.

    I was very glad Gabe took the valuable class time to go over the Diagonal Line Kata. I had seen the videos of the kata and I tried to reproduce the moves, however, I was unsuccessful in replicating the kata. I am a person likes what to know the details and a firm believer in the practice makes permanent…not perfect. We first learned the individual skills for all the moves through dry work and shooting drills. Then Gabe went over the kata a few times with explanations of each move. Having trained the skills and then having Gabe perform the kata gave the information I needed to understand and perform the kata. The first day the class worked on it there was some difficulty to perform the kata in an acceptable level. The class could not see the forest through the trees. The next day Gabe changed the flow to always start the kata in the same direction and that helped the class tremendously by lessening the confusion factor of facing at the end of the individual triangles.

    I have since practiced the kata the more traditional way. One aspect that helped me was to have a mark on the ground that was my “attacker” in the middle of the triangle you were working and always think of facing the attacker except for the checking 6 moves. In the 1 and 11 o’clock triangles this forces you to do the initial move/line and then during your secondary move/line turn back to the center of the triangle. When you finish you still are facing your attacker. During the 5 and 7 o’clock moves your initial and secondary moves/lines are facing the same direction because your attacker is in the center of that triangle. When you finish you are facing the opposite direction then when you started because your attacker is in the center of that triangle bleeding out I might add.
    Don M.
    Scottsdale, AZ

    "Man's flight through life is sustained by the power of his knowledge"

    Austin 'Dusty' Miller, the quote on the Eagle & Fledgling statue at the U.S. Air Force Academy

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,597
    One of the great benefits of kata training is that it deeply instills an understanding of angles. This goes beyond understanding the idea of angles in your head...it translates to a deep understanding in the body as well.

    Of course your body doesn't think, but it learns how to move. And coordinating your mind and body helps you automatically orient yourself in relation to your target.

    This seems simple; the idea is simple in fact. But DOING it automatically, without thinking, while under violent stress is another thing entirely. This is a truly fundamental fighting skill and I think is an under-appreciated benefit of practicing kata. It's like creating a compass in your head which allows you to automatically orient in relation to your enemy.

    This is another great comparison between animals and humans. Animals are much more instinctual (though they also "train" by playing when they're young). Most humans seem to have lost this instinct and really require training and practice to do this stuff automatically.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Washington

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    44,986
    The compass analogy is excellent.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Nearly Free State of Arizona
    Posts
    328
    I thought the integration into red dot was excellent. I would go farther though in stating that we should preview it on day 1. Use it as a “warm up” for the class to get everyone’s blood flowing. Then, revisit it as the class warm up on day 2. That way, when we get to reactive movements in the afternoon, we have already had two sets of limited exposure. Having it as a warmup on Day 1 will also let you see how people learn and move at the very start of class.
    “How can I shoot people? Shooting people is easy. It is the simple application of the fundamentals of marksmanship. The hard part is ensuring that I have the physical strength to prevail, the moral strength to know when it is right to kill, and the mental strength to articulate the aftermath such that I maintain my freedom while they experience what comes next in the afterlife.”

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