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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    313

    Default A lesson from one who has gone before us.

    Mark Payne is a bit of local legend, having received his black belt from Jim Harrison in something like three years, then becoming a world-renowned fighter.
    I had to pleasure to set under Mark's teaching a few times. While I didn't ever get a chance to really know Mark, I know the men I respect had a high level of respect for Mark. Anyway his wife wrote this a recently and I thought I'd share it.

    "Today is the one-year anniversary of Mark’s passing. I miss my husband so much. As well as his family and I have been lost without him. I don’t have to tell you what a special man Mark was and will always be to everyone. I really haven’t spoke about this until today but as you may know Mark had cancer, but really what he struggled with was C.T.E. He had been sick and suffering like no one knows the last couple of years. After the autopsy research from Boston university, it was confirmed Mark had a severe case stage III of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (C.T.E) it is found in people who have had multiple head injuries. It was confirmed Mark had a severe case. Nothing like what they had seen before. Out of four stages of this disease Mark had stage III and a severe case of it. I wanted everyone to know what Mark was dealing with. I would look it up and study it if I was in the karate world. Symptoms are really hard to notice. Boston university told me if I knew any of Mark’s friends that thought that they could have CTE that they should get with a neurologist and a psychologist and work together to treat the symptoms. Thank you to everyone that has been thinking about Mark this past year. What a great man we have lost. The good news for Mark he is in paradise with our Lord and Savior now."
    Be alert, stand firm in the faith, act like a man, be strong. Your every action must be done with love.

    “Adversity introduces a man to himself.”

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    383
    And something else to ponder for those who are heavy into the MAs....

    If you are, as I am, severely myopic - that will (or at least could) have significant impact on your life down the road. I won't put on my professor hat, other than to say that if you are near sighted, your retina is being stretched, i.e., it is under tension. Stated another way - it is basically asking to tear away from the rear portion of your eye. In my case - when I went to sign-up with the USMC in 1970 - this is a significant portion of what caused them to turn me down. Ten years later when I applied to the FBI (yeh, I know:) - same thing, same reason. I finally gave up and entered the world of academia. (What is it - "those who can, do - and those who can't, teach"?). So what did I do? I got heavily into Isshin Ryu karate for 25+ years and got punched and kicked in the head for that same period of time! (I know - should have avoided or blocked:) And let's say that this was a different time for karate than what is taught nowadays in the majority of dojos! Example - we would send students to the ER for knife wounds because upper level knife defense was with live blades. Contact was contact. Though it didn't happen on the dojo floor - it all caught up with me, and I had a significant portion of the retina tear off - naturally, on my dominant eye. Had to be re-attached with laser spot-welding with 200 laser pulses!!!! Ouch! And yes - sight and target acquisition are now a challenge - but you deal with it as with anything in life.

    So - in addition to neurological trauma as a possibility, there is also the possibility of visual impairment for some karateka. Having said that - I would NOT go back and change any of it. Those who have trained will tell you that it is a life altering time in their life, and well worth it from oh so many points of view. I simply offer this as a point of information.

    geezer john

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,248
    Quote Originally Posted by jmoore View Post
    So - in addition to neurological trauma as a possibility, there is also the possibility of visual impairment for some karateka. Having said that - I would NOT go back and change any of it. Those who have trained will tell you that it is a life altering time in their life, and well worth it from oh so many points of view. I simply offer this as a point of information.

    geezer john
    Good post and made me want to expand on it...

    Life is life altering, and if you're going to live a life worth living, there will be some risk involved.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    313
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Good post and made me want to expand on it...

    Life is life altering, and if you're going to live a life worth living, there will be some risk involved.
    Exactly.
    Be alert, stand firm in the faith, act like a man, be strong. Your every action must be done with love.

    “Adversity introduces a man to himself.”

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Good post and made me want to expand on it...

    Life is life altering, and if you're going to live a life worth living, there will be some risk involved.
    Indeed.
    Reminds me of a quote I saw about fifty years ago, on the pages of a Ranger unit photo collection.

    "Life, for those who've had to fight for it, holds a flavor the meek shall never know."

    I concur.

    Sent from BlackBerry KeyOne

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    A communist state north of the Potomac.
    Posts
    505
    Jesus calls us to live life to the full. A retina can be repaired, but a life lived in a bubble and a lifeless soul is indeed sad.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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