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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    7,736
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    Minimum price is $850. Wake up CMP...you'd have better luck selling M9s. For $850 you can send a beat up Glock 17 to me and get back the penultimate expression of the gunfighter's tools, and not worn out US versions of a Romanian WASR-10 parts gun.
    “They don’t want to mess up the 1911 market”... The reason they were able to sell them before is because they were cheap and then people would send them out as soon as they got them just as you are saying. If I were into old 1911s, I would just cough up the cash to get one on gunbroker.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    7,736
    At least you know what you are getting.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    7,868
    Dad was a steel mill machinist who was fond of the 1911. I can remember a dozen of GI barrels still in cosmo for $20 if memory serves. He crowned them for hollow points and cast SWC rounds. I still have one in the 45 box. This was circa late 60s maybe early 70s.

    Dad liked milsurp parts. He said that WW II testing required stripped frames and slides to work from a bucket of parts. Supposedly this was to prevent favoritism for Colts as they had the "custom fitting" down to a science for their production guns.

    When it was sorted out all guns accepted by .gov would work with any parts.

    My fading memory from Dad's fading memory. There is room for error in my position.

    Choirboy

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    168
    Anyone buying one of these for serious purposes is an idiot - buy something more modern and with higher capacity (an SI glock comes to mind).

    These are in the same boat as a M1 Garand - a cool piece of history. I'm far more likely to buy one of these than a Kimber, but as a collectible.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,563
    Quote Originally Posted by chad newton View Post
    What would be the advantage in buying one of those? I always thought people bought them because they were cheaper then sent them out to get work done.
    No advantage as opposed to a modern anything. I'll buy one because I like old milsurp guns.

    As for the price... The Dollar is in the tank, so shit is more expensive than it used to be. We have to deal with that all over the place.
    Last edited by H60DoorGunner; 05-12-2018 at 04:52 PM.
    Isaiah 54:17

    Deus dea traballo, dixo o enterrador.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,017
    Quote Originally Posted by choirboy View Post
    Dad liked milsurp parts. He said that WW II testing required stripped frames and slides to work from a bucket of parts. Supposedly this was to prevent favoritism for Colts as they had the "custom fitting" down to a science for their production guns.
    When it was sorted out all guns accepted by .gov would work with any parts.
    Makes sense, as anyone who's tried to drop-in an extractor on a Colt can testify.

    As far as these being "parts guns," the practice of rebuilding using common or swapped parts goes back to the early decades of military 1911 use. The odds are good that many 1911s will have swapped parts and will have served in numerous wars and "police actions."

    There was some discussion here awhile back that the WWII production guns used parts that were not as hard as the commercial versions. For that reason, the projected prices and the availability of 1911s in the marketplace I'll give this offering a pass. Not that I wouldn't mind owning an early production true 1911 or pre-WWII 1911A1 again.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    2, 2, 11. And a wakeup.

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