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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    North Alabama
    Posts
    56

    Default Nutrition journal suggests new guidelines for egg consumption

    For those looking for a nutrient rich, easy to prepare protein source.

    We have our own chickens, and my wife and I eat more far eggs than are traditionally recommended. And yet our cholesterol levels (and LDL/HDL ratios) have never been a problem.

    While eggs — particularly the yolk — are high in fat, they are full of vitamins, minerals, protein and healthy omega-3 fats. The yolk is packed with nutrients, so there’s no need to opt for egg-whites only.

    Eggs do not significantly raise cholesterol in the blood, the Mayo Clinic reports, and people who replace a grain-based breakfast with eggs have been found to eat fewer calories over the day.


    Nutrition journal suggests new guidelines for egg consumption

    We know eggs make a healthy, affordable and tasty meal — but now research has revealed just how many of them it is safe to eat in a week.

    And in good news for lovers of a frittata or scramble, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found there were no adverse effects from having as many as 12 over seven days.

    The researchers found that weight loss was similar over a year for people on a low-egg (two a week) and a high-egg (12 a week) diet.

    They discovered that even participants with type-2 diabetes did not suffer adverse effects from eating a diet high in eggs such as inflammation, cardiometabolic risk levels or raised glucose levels.

    “A healthy diet based on population guidelines and including more eggs than currently recommended by some countries may be safely consumed,” concluded the researchers.

    It has prompted a call for a review of the National Heart Foundation guidelines, which recommend just six eggs a week.

    While eggs — particularly the yolk — are high in fat, they are full of vitamins, minerals, protein and healthy omega-3 fats. The yolk is packed with nutrients, so there’s no need to opt for egg-whites only.

    Eggs do not significantly raise cholesterol in the blood, the Mayo Clinic reports, and people who replace a grain-based breakfast with eggs have been found to eat fewer calories over the day.

    Just don’t store them in your fridge door.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    The Republic of Pirates
    Posts
    43,101
    Based on my studies and verified via blood tests.

    Total cholesterol is irrelevant
    A high HDL is very desirable
    A low triglyceride level is desirable
    Dividing Triglyceride level by HDL will yield a ratio...closer to "1" is better than higher that "1". Below is excellent (mine was .725)
    That ratio tells you about you LDL (if they are dense particles of the protective fluffy particles)
    The medical establishment's insistence of lower total cholesterol, via statins, is ill-advised
    Get a doc that is fit, and current, and get blood done to verify numbers.

    And I eat a great deal of eggs, butter and cream
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,558
    I have a farm-egg supply, and usually eat more than a dozen per week. Have for many years.
    ===========================
    Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Washington Co. Arkansas
    Posts
    3,605
    I consume 3 per day for breakfast on an average day,

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    389
    We have our own chickens as well and eat a lot of eggs. I was just having a conversation at work about the laughable cholesterol concerns.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Cascade, NC
    Posts
    3
    Eggs are basically skinless, boneless chickens and contain everything you need to make a whole chicken, or a person, except the DNA. Definitely good for you.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    703
    I agree about cholesterol not being a concern for most people. If your one of the unlucky few 20% or so that has the APOE4 gene, it may be prudent to watch your LDL levels and not eat as much saturated fat. A keto diet is still apoe4's best bet but with less saturated fat and more polyunsaturated fat like olive oil. Sucks but that's the way it is.
    But eggs are one of the best fat sources for apoe4's, especially if the chickens didn't get fed a high grain diet
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