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  1. #1
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    Default TAIPAN'S BOOKSHELF - EXERCISE

    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
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    Is the Last listing, The Barbell Prescription:Strength Training for Life After 40 of valuable for someone that's lifted for almost 40 years? I feel pretty comfortable with my lifting and lifting knowledge, but admit I know nothing about lifting into my 60's.

  3. #3
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    The last book is very good, experienced or not. Also look him up on YouTube under Grey Steel, he is a very good speaker and very knowledgeable.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    The last book is very good, experienced or not. Also look him up on YouTube under Grey Steel, he is a very good speaker and very knowledgeable.
    Will do, thank you.

  5. #5
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    Nearing my 60th, I seek all useful information about keeping strong and lean. Thank you for the book recommendations.
    "When one goes willingly into the darkness, all he will find there, is what he brought in with him".

    --Gabe Suarez, after the 7-11 shootout

    Proper development of the 'Warrior Spirit', training and physical conditioning before 'The Event' cannot be overstated.

    U.S. Army Rangers (1/75 'Old Scroll')
    CRG; 0-5 Feet CRG; PSP Pistol; FOF Instructor School; Combat Pistol Instructor School

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forklift View Post
    Is the Last listing, The Barbell Prescription:Strength Training for Life After 40 of valuable for someone that's lifted for almost 40 years? I feel pretty comfortable with my lifting and lifting knowledge, but admit I know nothing about lifting into my 60's.
    I've read all three and would say that they are listed in priority. Starting Strength provides the basic building blocks. Practical Programming helps you to put them together into a plan. Barbell Prescription adds a few tweaks for age.

    The single dominant lesson that I took away from the last book is that I now have to give myself more recovery time than I needed a decade ago. If you are either 25 or supplementing testosterone, you can work out six days a week by running a split routine. For a natural 40-year-old, you need more time to recharge. Splits isn't enough rest, because you need a full day just to rest your central nervous system. And some days--like following max-effort deadlifts--you'd actually benefit from two days off. There is more to the book than that, but that is the most succinct synopsis I can provide.
    Virtute et Armis

  7. #7
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    I will add a few words that are not in the books. You need to periodize your training. I personally respect the work Rippetoe has done with brining strength work to the mainstream, but disagree with him on the bodyfat issue. Ripp does not care about bodyfat as long as you are strong. And he doesn't care what you look like as long as you are strong. I disagree and believe that the older you are, excessive bodyfat becomes the parking place for all manner of future illnesses and diseases. Strong and lean is far better than slightly stronger and fat.

    I found that the SS program is great and brings your strength up considerably...but every few months it is beneficial to change the volume/intensity.

    For example...last Fall i got my deadlift up to 455 (1 set of 1 rep). Nothing much by pro powerlifting standards, but huge for a 57 year old that was stuck below 405 for a year. The linear progression was great but recovery was longer and longer as I got stronger. I took a couple of weeks off coinciding with some training events and then shifted to a more hypertrophy based program having deloaded. Ripp only thinks of strength, whereas I think of muscle building as well but based on strength.

    So my last workout where I deadlifted (hypertrophy based) I did 5 sets of 5 reps at 385. Submaximal but building the base for later this year when I will see what I can pull...maybe 475?

    For the average, belly-bigger-than-chest dude that realizes his IDPA score hasn't as much to do with his probable suvccess as his lack of fitness, the SS program is excellent. Follow it religiously. For the pilates-marathon runner that realizes he can't do a single pullup and that his strength is lower than his T-score, listen to Rippetoe.

    Once you have the ability to bench press (or equivalent exercise) 1 1/2 your weight, squat 1 1/2 your weight and deadlift twice your weight, begin really studying the Prorgramming book and don't be afraid to deviate from the program to try a more body building based program such as GVT.
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  8. #8
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    Fat is where men over 35 store extra estrogen, and it's a building cycle, the more you store, the more you create which is why you see guys with titties. By controlling your estrogen and testosterone production through diet and exercise you'll have more energy, burn more fat, recover faster. There is no benefit to being fat.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
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    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by LawDog View Post
    There is more to the book than that, but that is the most succinct synopsis I can provide.
    Excellent summing up. High high volume has never been a recipe for progress for me. As I get older, that's more the case. This book was an excellent read for me, but that was my primary takeaway as well.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Agree on the periodization (I always called it cycling).

    His books are good, own both and i have a signed copy of his SS book.

    Years ago I did a 3x5 like his, with a few changes. Only added 1 or two back off sets where I would do 3-4 rest paused reps, and immediately do a drop set with a few more rest pauses. Cleans i did 15 sets instead of 5. Added abs and curlz.

    Tbh I think most 3 or 5x5 routines are a little too low volume/slow result producing to maintain my attention.

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