Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,614

    Default The Okinawa Takeoff

    I was asked for more detail on how to perform the takeoff from the Watch Your Back kata.

    This footwork is straight out of a very old Okinawan Karate kata (Naihanchi for those interested). Thus we call it the Okinawa Takeoff.

    It's not a replacement for the standard takeoff, it's just a different option. Honestly, I think of both takeoffs as the same thing...the Okinawa takeoff just incorporates some enhancements.

    Pros & Cons:

    The "Standard" Takeoff:
    *Easy to do - it's very natural and anyone with even a sliver of athletic ability can do it
    *It works standing still as well as walking
    *On the negative side, it's more challenging on slick surfaces
    *Some guys with knee problems have trouble because it creates a lot of impact

    The Okinawa Takeoff:
    *More difficult to learn, definitely takes more practice
    *It harnesses gravity by falling into it, making it faster and less effort if performed correctly
    *Slick surfaces aren't as much of a problem
    *It's more gentle on the knees
    *It can cover more ground from a single step

    By the way, the standard takeoff can also harness gravity...just hinge the front foot as demonstrated in the video. I consider all these takeoffs just minor variations of the same thing.

    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Washington

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,345
    Interesting. The Naihanchi I was taught contained nothing even remotely similar. Wansu and Chinto had a pivot resembling the static position but could not have been applied in this way. Interesting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,614
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hatfield View Post
    Interesting. The Naihanchi I was taught contained nothing even remotely similar. Wansu and Chinto had a pivot resembling the static position but could not have been applied in this way. Interesting.
    It's one of those things that is in there but not so explicit. There is what the kata explicitly shows...that is what everyone can see and you don't really need a teacher to know what it means. And then there is what is hidden...the only way to know this is to learn it from a teacher that knew.

    The nami gaeshi kick - that is the isolated knee hinge movement. The crossing feet step - that is the switching feet movement.

    There are certainly other applications for those movements, but the movement offline is primary. At least based on what I've been taught.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Washington

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    45,003
    Enpi has similar footwork. Its there in Tekki...if you look beyond the tournament application. Each footwork concept has best applications depending on where you start...where you are positioned in relation to the attack.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,614
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    Enpi has similar footwork. Its there in Tekki...if you look beyond the tournament application. Each footwork concept has best applications depending on where you start...where you are positioned in relation to the attack.
    This.

    The crossing foot action can be found in a few different kata. It's more obvious in some (the movement application from hinging the knee is much more obvious in Gekki Sai). I point to Naihanchi/Tekki because we know it's one of the oldest kata that exists. Also it's the one that I've studied most deeply.

    Obviously it had a strong influence on Watch Your Back.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Washington

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    507
    Hmm....The Naihanchi katas I was taught all use a crossing step, but nothing like that. It's a pure lateral motion.

    Having said that, this sort of discussion is a major reason why I come here. You treat shooting as a living art yet to be perfected.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    45,003
    Ok...so use the crossing footwork fast and suddenly...with a balance leaning into the line of travel. Suddenly you will find the take off.

    This stuff is not the bullshit karate you see at the strip mall or the local tournament...this is for killing...at least it was at one time...and it is for us as well...now...here.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,614
    Gabe is exactly right.

    Naihanchi is remarkably similar across different karate systems. Every version I have seen, although the hands move quickly the footwork is relatively slow. Slow movement almost always means that the technique is particularly significant.

    The footwork is practiced slowly because it is emphasizing the development of solid posture and body structure. We test the structure using partners pushing against you. If you wilt like a flower from a gentle push, clearly your structure is not very strong. If your structure is solid, then you can deliver a much stronger strike, whether with the hands or feet. This slow practice also develops very strong balance.

    Application is not always exactly the same as training exercises. However, the body structure is exactly the same. This footwork is meant not only to get you off the X quickly, but also to simultaneously block an incoming attack and deliver a powerful strike. You’ll have to take my word for it, it works very well.

    Solid body structure is very important for hand to hand fighting. Not quite as important to reactive gunfighting, but it doesn’t hurt.

    The footwork as I have demonstrated in the video is not taught everywhere because it is largely forgotten. But I know old men who were taught this as boys.

    Knowledge is deeper than it appears on the surface. And remember that some things in karate were taught to deceive on purpose.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Washington

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    NWFL
    Posts
    15,081
    I like the fact that last part is with long guns. I was wondering when we would get to them.
    One who hammers his gun into a plow plows for those who do not....Unknown
    ...at the end of the day its not about anything else but YOU AND YOURS..... Gabe Suarez
    ....WANT not NEED is what America is all about. ..... Gabe Suarez
    Its not about how fast you can load, but about how well you can shoot ..... Someone being saved by a speed load is not something that has happened with any regularity. Gabe Suarez

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    7,333
    Quote Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
    I like the fact that last part is with long guns. I was wondering when we would get to them.

    The foundational foot work is all the same. The difference is what you do with the upper body. Long guns are a little more complicated vs a handgun insofar as what you do to work the gun and get it where you need it.
    Geek Warlord
    Dungeons & Dragons & Deadlifts

    Muscle Wizard Casts: Fist


    CRG-1 DPS
    CRG-2 CRG x 2
    SGF-1 Shotgun Gunfighting
    Trauma care under fire
    Spetsnaz Sniper
    HRO-5 Terrorist & Active Shooter Interdiction
    HRO-6 CQB: Fighting in Structures
    CRG-4 Force on Force
    HRO-5 Terrorist & Active Shooter Interdiction - 3 day
    TWOTU edition
    Trauma Medicine for the CCW Operator
    Pistol Ground Fighting (Taint Shooting Progressions)

    TWOTU since May 2015

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •