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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Western WA
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    Fighting is fighting and bodies move the same way with every weapon.

    Sometimes the characteristics of a given weapon require an adjustment with your technique. A take off to 7 o’clock is more complicated with a long gun and a pistol. But we have a workaround for that...and it’s hidden in “Watch Your Back“.

    Imagine “Diagonal Lines” performed with a rifle. It works the same way. I don’t know if Gabe has designs on completely different long gun kata, but Diagonal Lines could easily translate as it is.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    NWFL
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    13,038
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Fighting is fighting and bodies move the same way with every weapon.

    Sometimes the characteristics of a given weapon require an adjustment with your technique. A take off to 7 o’clock is more complicated with a long gun and a pistol. But we have a workaround for that...and it’s hidden in “Watch Your Back“.

    Imagine “Diagonal Lines” performed with a rifle. It works the same way. I don’t know if Gabe has designs on completely different long gun kata, but Diagonal Lines could easily translate as it is.
    Diagonal lines I am sure will be part of what ever rifle kata comes to be.

    The assault rifle is not only a projectile weapon, but it can be used to strike people as in this photo from the AK DVD.
    Below strike number one.
    numberone strike.jpg
    One who hammers his gun into a plow plows for those who do not....Unknown
    ...at the end of the day its not about anything else but YOU AND YOURS..... Gabe Suarez
    ....WANT not NEED is what America is all about. ..... Gabe Suarez
    Its not about how fast you can load, but about how well you can shoot ..... Someone being saved by a speed load is not something that has happened with any regularity. Gabe Suarez

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    The Republic of Pirates
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    42,767
    The other thing to consider guys is that the original Okinawan karateka (karate guys) trained outside in the open...in nature. When things were taken "inside" many of the original masters scoffed at "Parlor Karate". What problems does this bring? I will list them

    1). The footing "outside" is different than the gym floor. There are no mats by the way for those who like to go to the ground. Training barefoot on a flat and clean floor is necessary in early development but as a fighter develops he must take his fighting system outside. The daily clothing, foot wear, weather, and surface will affect the expression of your skills in one way or another.

    2). The environment may be constricted or it may be open. This forces the fighter to - wait for it - adapt to his environment. Some kata were designed for close fighting, others for open ground fighting...but the foot work of each can be adapted. The close quarters of a gym create an artificial limit to movement that may or may not be there in the real world.

    3). Now for the one that will be unpopular. What you carry and HOW you carry will determine the effectiveness of this strategy. Carrying a weapon with a safety "on", in a thum-break holster, under a layer of concealment, behind your back will retard your ability to move dynamically and produce the weapon while doing so. I do not care how many SF-SEAL-SOCOM Ninjas carry in whatever way, we all have two arms and two legs and are limited by the container of the human body. Some things make this easier and others do not.

    4). Another unpopular - the more athletic you are, the easier this is to do. If you can only manage to waddle to the firing line between doughnuts and cigs...sorry..you have much bigger issues. But this too can be remedied.

    5). In original traditional kata, when you see something done slowly, it is because the original teacher wanted to emphasize its value and importance. Today slow segments are done that way at the McDojo for dramatic tension. That was never the original idea. Take the after-action process in Diagonal Lines. There is a definite change in tempo. or speed. There is a deliberateness that is shown in those movements. Why? Because one scans to see additional targets...not just to look like they are doing something cool.
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    The Republic of Pirates
    Posts
    42,767
    Well...keeping Felix secured in the bag - what we are working on is better.

    Quote Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
    Diagonal lines I am sure will be part of what ever rifle kata comes to be.

    The assault rifle is not only a projectile weapon, but it can be used to strike people as in this photo from the AK DVD.
    Below strike number one.
    numberone strike.jpg
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    349
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    1). The footing "outside" is different than the gym floor. There are no mats by the way for those who like to go to the ground. Training barefoot on a flat and clean floor is necessary in early development but as a fighter develops he must take his fighting system outside. The daily clothing, foot wear, weather, and surface will affect the expression of your skills in one way or another.
    This also shows strongly in fencing. Modern fencing is entirely indoors, often on a high-traction strip that allows a very aggressive footwork style. Old-school epee was fought out of doors on a grass strip. Much lower traction, and the old school epeeists favored a very subtle technique that was more based on bladework. When I was teaching fencing, I'd take the students outdoors on occasion just to get them used to it, because it made that much of a difference.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    The Republic of Pirates
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    42,767
    Dont get me started on fencing. Fencing is exhibit A in the case of how sport totally eliminates any axtual combat value from a system and turns it into a game. Olymoic Tae Kwon Do is Exhibit B.
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,111
    Demonstrating the kata on a flat, clean surface is necessary so students know exactly what movement is intended.

    Learning it on a flat, clean surface is helpful...eliminating variables when first learning it is important.

    Once the pattern is learned, practice it in a variety of environments.

    Very important to practice the takeoff on grass, sand, dry pavement, wet pavement, etc. You have to know how it works in different environments.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    781
    Brent, thanks for all your videos lately man. I’ve got my 2nd degree in Taekwondo and me and my family are starting Krav next week. Might not be the best, but hand to hand skills are the most important in my opinion. Plus great way to see how bad you need to work on your fitness


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #19
    One of the other massive advantages of this kind of movement--where one 'falls' into motion rather than 'stepping'--is that it subverts the natural movement pattern that humans expect to see. When people do not have the visual cues of normal movement, they do not 'see' it. If you do not step forward, your head does not bob up or down. If you do not step forward, your feet don't lead a movement finished with your hips. Etc.

    These kinds of 'takeoff' movements use a different system of generating forward motion than is typical to the human animal. As a result, if you're clever about it, you can move quite a distance before your opponent sees you. Speed in fighting comes from two places: actual velocity, and the suddenness of movement. Moving without telegraph is 'fast'.

    This kind of footwork is fundamental to accelerating without telegraphing your motion.

    If it takes your opponent longer to realize what you've done, you can 'teleport' towards them. The result is mentally unbalancing. It can legitimately cause a kind of vertigo. Koryu jujutsu teaches this kind of movement, too. I've had a man execute this kind of movement so quickly and suddenly and without warning, and move into a dominant position, that by the time my mind caught up with things, I literally recoiled like a cat, jumping back. It was too late, and he had already struck me.
    There is no hunting like the hunting of man, and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never care for anything else thereafter.
    ~Ernest Hemingway

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