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  1. #1
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    Default Short article from Rob Shaul of MTI

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/tyran...eggEAe9w%3D%3D

    The article is to the point, he lays out the relationship between durability and fitness and how stretching, foam rolling, etc. isn't as important as some believe. Tribe, what say you?

    Jim
    ISA 6:8

  2. #2
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    Not gonna lie. I don't exactly know just what that article is talking about. I have never heard of that stuff lol. I do know that stretching and mobility work is very important. I don't do it right before big lifts as I feel weaker then but its something I do daily.

    As for the rest of that stuff ask Mr. Anthony. He is a subject matter expert on this stuff.
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  3. #3
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    My takeaway was the fitter and stronger you are the more durable you'll be and that foam rolling and the rest may not be as critical as some folks teach It goes along with some things Dan John has penned on T-Nation

  4. #4
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    I would agree as long as a person doesn't have any dysfunctional movement patterns caused by muscle imbalances, anterior pelvic tilt, lordosis, kyphosis, etc.... Loading dysfunctional movement patterns will cause injury. It's just a matter of time. I would assume that Dan John and Rob Shaul are training athletes that are already devoid of these potential problems. Low FMS scores may not correlate with injury potential in NFL players, but it probably does for office workers, weekend warriors, those over thirty etc... Instead of FMS, I think assessments that look at static physical imbalances and muscular strength imbalances give a clearer picture. I like Assess and Correct by Eric Cressey.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Miller View Post
    My takeaway was the fitter and stronger you are the more durable you'll be and that foam rolling and the rest may not be as critical as some folks teach It goes along with some things Dan John has penned on T-Nation
    Is there a time when it would be benificial to be less flexable or have a decreased range of motion? Would there be a time when being more flexable and haveing a greater range of motion would be harmful?

    I remember a time with a cop friend tried to do some sorta behind the back arm control thing to me... he got made because it didnt work because I was flexable enough that it didnt cause me any pain like he wanted.

    There are some whom would say I am strong and durable lol.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorkface View Post
    Is there a time when it would be benificial to be less flexable or have a decreased range of motion? Would there be a time when being more flexable and haveing a greater range of motion would be harmful?

    I remember a time with a cop friend tried to do some sorta behind the back arm control thing to me... he got made because it didnt work because I was flexable enough that it didnt cause me any pain like he wanted.

    There are some whom would say I am strong and durable lol.
    I can imagine that too much flexibility might be counterproductive for some sports like power lifting (but I don't know). Honestly I don't care.

    I know that flexibility is a good thing for FIGHTING. Mobility is a good thing for fighting.

    I tend to agree that durability is a function of fitness. But it's also a function of mindset. And finally it's a function of time. Years spent doing certain activities, such as taking impact, will naturally make you less susceptible to being shut down when you get hit.

    Of course, we also have to balance our training. As Chambers famously said, there's a fine line between hard and retard.

    Hitting the makiwara for instance...overdo it and you'll injure yourself. Underdo it and you won't develop the ability to withstand hard impact on your fist. Figure out what is "just right" for you (and I don't understand why that is so hard).

    I don't know how effective things like foam rollers and massage are from a scientific perspective. I know that those things have helped me when I've been injured. I know they've helped me stave off injury. I know they have helped keep me more mobile and flexible than I would have been otherwise. I also know that those things make me less susceptible to pain when being hit. So many times I've just looked at a guy who swears I should be yelling in pain from the pressure point attack he's using on me. So many times when it looked like I should have been tapping out from a joint submission and the other guy abandoned it when it wasn't working.

    I'll keep doing what I'm doing.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorkface View Post
    Would there be a time when being more flexable and haveing a greater range of motion would be harmful?
    Only in extreme outlier cases. Not something to spend brainpower on.
    ===========================
    Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
    Only in extreme outlier cases. Not something to spend brainpower on.
    Sounds like girl that I would like to meet...
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  9. #9
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    Short answer: SAID. Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands. If you are strong as shit and not flexible, spending too much time on foam rollers, trigger point massage, etc does NOT make you better. You get better at what you practice. SAID. If you want to be strong as F#ck, tough as F#ck, and fight like a motherf#cker, Lift heavy weights, hit the heavy bag, spar with your friends and don't get caught up in the fitness world's mumbojumbo of turning everyone into a cirque de solei performer. If you want to be a performer, go ahead and practice flexibility, yoga, dance, mobility drills. Nothing wrong with that, either. But you won't be a bad ass.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnlamb+++ View Post
    Short answer: SAID. Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands. If you are strong as shit and not flexible, spending too much time on foam rollers, trigger point massage, etc does NOT make you better. You get better at what you practice. SAID. If you want to be strong as F#ck, tough as F#ck, and fight like a motherf#cker, Lift heavy weights, hit the heavy bag, spar with your friends and don't get caught up in the fitness world's mumbojumbo of turning everyone into a cirque de solei performer. If you want to be a performer, go ahead and practice flexibility, yoga, dance, mobility drills. Nothing wrong with that, either. But you won't be a bad ass.
    agreed

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