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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    I think the American Hippy Culture has also infiltrated many martial systems 9more Aikido than karate but still)...

    I have trained with lots of people, good and bad. None inspire my desire to crack skulls like the smug aikido hippie. They are the Prius drivers of the martial arts world.
    3FFA4F62-1F75-45DE-8CD1-7F90130D22C0.jpg

    Very few instructors that teach openly have actually used karate in anger and thus theory never meets reality (and by that I mean in the real world for keeps to intentionally injure or kill another man).

    my karate instructor was a true thug in his day. He was a good guy but he had a chip on his shoulder. He had a special place in his heart for beating up Yakuza. The Tokyo police AND the local mob boss actually asked his mother to get him to knock it off. His mother told him that she couldn’t stop him, but she would kill herself in shame if he kept it up. Probably that was the only thing that made him stop.

    Brent...you know Ian. If we can facilitate his visit it would be a fantastic opportunity for all tribal members with a vetted karate background.
    Iain Is having some visa issues right now. Apparently he has been to the US too many times and now needs an “O Visa Classification”, whatever that means. If anyone in the tribe has insider pull, please let me know.
    Last edited by Brent Yamamoto; 03-06-2018 at 07:18 PM.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  2. #22
    As a point of historical perspective, the Jutsu->Do shift occurred generally during the Meiji restoration, during which Japan secularized and westernized, and with those social movements, the Samurai--who in the wake of the late Shogunate era of general stability and peace had largely become administrators--lost their final trappings of being a warrior caste.

    The martial arts of yore, meaning those from pre-Meiji era, or what is referred to as koryu--classical--predate this shift in politics and culture. All had their roots either directly from the medieval era, or in the DNA of their various progenitor arts, each of which had roots in the medieval era. Either way, there was no mistake to be made: they were the professional skill sets of a warrior caste, and had nothing whatever to do with 'self defense' as understood in the modern American context. There was no 'Mister Miyagi' about it, they were hard men, who lived lives dedicated to war, and had the scars to prove it.

    As a result of the conditions in which the martial systems were built, they centered around things that are considered 'impractical' for a ton of reasons. Nobody needs to study the disposition of troops in a battle line, or the methods of communication used to coordinate them by sounding whistles, firing noise arrows, the use of flags or banners, horns etc. We have radios. Nobody needs to study the art of tying up a prisoner with a fast-rope in order that he may be ransomed and/or interrogated. We have flex cuffs. Nobody needs to know how to build a sodegarami, or 'sleeve catcher', a tool designed to be used to safely and less-than-lethally detain an inebriated or enraged swordsman.

    But, certain skills are forever applicable. The human body only moves in so many ways, and it's joints and bones and nerve plexuses are the same, regardless of the century in which the body was born into. Men still carry their tools on their beltline. Men still arm themselves with Primary and Secondary weapons. Warriors still need to carry weapons into an NPE, and train to deploy them rapidly, suddenly, and without warning. Men still need to train their minds and spirits to the harsh rigors of violence.

    They were thugs. They were dangerous men, who had done dangerous things. They had, like all warriors, little patience for chicanery and bullshit and overblown ego. They sought The Truth, usually finding it in blood and steel. They were profound because they had done difficult and terrible things. Some may have sought spiritual enlightenment, but such was an accidental by-product of their austere and dangerous lives, which is a complete reversal of the Do-style of a practice dedicated from the onset towards enlightenment.

    When I was studying koryu, my teacher had used his skills against multiple armed attackers. His teacher had caused life-changing injury to many men, often in public arenas, one such instance in which he was challenged by a kendo-ka who inferred that Kendo was the true inheritor of the Japanese sword arts. He, having been raised in a dojo by men covered in scars from swinging actual swords at actual people, and he himself bearing such scars on his face and neck, took up a shinai and essentially said, "Oh yeah? Show me." And in an instant, the moment they met, he let out a great kiai, delivered a powerful attack, and broke his shinai over the kendo-ka's head and shoulder, knocking him unconscious to the floor. His teacher was a man who was missing an eye from a sword duel, and had spilled the blood of men with edged weapons in the service of his profession. The men who taught this man were consummate warriors, who had plied their trades on the battlefield and lived to tell the tale.

    The point is, as is so often stated here on this forum, there is a true warrior spirit that can be found in martial study, but it is found in places where grown-ass men sweat and grunt and heave and struggle, and where injury and bloodshed are bedfellows of that struggle.

    Personally, I do not believe that one finds spiritual enlightenment through trying to walk the path of others towards that end. I have only ever found it by being out in the world, being tried and tested by difficult and austere things, and being forced to look deep inside myself to overcome my own limitations and to digest the hardship around me. A warrior's path often brings him into close contact with these things--death, suffering, injury, privation, exhaustion, etc.--and would that he survive, much less flourish, he is forced to become something deeper than he was beforehand.

    I enjoyed the article, and as usual, enjoy reading these threads.
    There is no hunting like the hunting of man, and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never care for anything else thereafter.
    ~Ernest Hemingway

  3. #23
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    Apr 2005
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    Here is an article debunking the popular hippie martial arts beliefs regarding Kyudo which also infected almost all Asian systems to some degree:

    http://www.thezensite.com/ZenEssays/...of_Archery.pdf
    "Why should I trade one tyrant 3,000 miles away for 3,000 tyrants one mile away. An elected legislature can trample a man's rights as easily as the king can." Benjamin Martin, The Patriot

  4. #24
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    May 2000
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    EXCELLENT!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by noonesshowmonkey View Post
    As a point of historical perspective, the Jutsu->Do shift occurred generally during the Meiji restoration, during which Japan secularized and westernized, and with those social movements, the Samurai--who in the wake of the late Shogunate era of general stability and peace had largely become administrators--lost their final trappings of being a warrior caste.

    The martial arts of yore, meaning those from pre-Meiji era, or what is referred to as koryu--classical--predate this shift in politics and culture. All had their roots either directly from the medieval era, or in the DNA of their various progenitor arts, each of which had roots in the medieval era. Either way, there was no mistake to be made: they were the professional skill sets of a warrior caste, and had nothing whatever to do with 'self defense' as understood in the modern American context. There was no 'Mister Miyagi' about it, they were hard men, who lived lives dedicated to war, and had the scars to prove it.

    As a result of the conditions in which the martial systems were built, they centered around things that are considered 'impractical' for a ton of reasons. Nobody needs to study the disposition of troops in a battle line, or the methods of communication used to coordinate them by sounding whistles, firing noise arrows, the use of flags or banners, horns etc. We have radios. Nobody needs to study the art of tying up a prisoner with a fast-rope in order that he may be ransomed and/or interrogated. We have flex cuffs. Nobody needs to know how to build a sodegarami, or 'sleeve catcher', a tool designed to be used to safely and less-than-lethally detain an inebriated or enraged swordsman.

    But, certain skills are forever applicable. The human body only moves in so many ways, and it's joints and bones and nerve plexuses are the same, regardless of the century in which the body was born into. Men still carry their tools on their beltline. Men still arm themselves with Primary and Secondary weapons. Warriors still need to carry weapons into an NPE, and train to deploy them rapidly, suddenly, and without warning. Men still need to train their minds and spirits to the harsh rigors of violence.

    They were thugs. They were dangerous men, who had done dangerous things. They had, like all warriors, little patience for chicanery and bullshit and overblown ego. They sought The Truth, usually finding it in blood and steel. They were profound because they had done difficult and terrible things. Some may have sought spiritual enlightenment, but such was an accidental by-product of their austere and dangerous lives, which is a complete reversal of the Do-style of a practice dedicated from the onset towards enlightenment.

    When I was studying koryu, my teacher had used his skills against multiple armed attackers. His teacher had caused life-changing injury to many men, often in public arenas, one such instance in which he was challenged by a kendo-ka who inferred that Kendo was the true inheritor of the Japanese sword arts. He, having been raised in a dojo by men covered in scars from swinging actual swords at actual people, and he himself bearing such scars on his face and neck, took up a shinai and essentially said, "Oh yeah? Show me." And in an instant, the moment they met, he let out a great kiai, delivered a powerful attack, and broke his shinai over the kendo-ka's head and shoulder, knocking him unconscious to the floor. His teacher was a man who was missing an eye from a sword duel, and had spilled the blood of men with edged weapons in the service of his profession. The men who taught this man were consummate warriors, who had plied their trades on the battlefield and lived to tell the tale.

    The point is, as is so often stated here on this forum, there is a true warrior spirit that can be found in martial study, but it is found in places where grown-ass men sweat and grunt and heave and struggle, and where injury and bloodshed are bedfellows of that struggle.

    Personally, I do not believe that one finds spiritual enlightenment through trying to walk the path of others towards that end. I have only ever found it by being out in the world, being tried and tested by difficult and austere things, and being forced to look deep inside myself to overcome my own limitations and to digest the hardship around me. A warrior's path often brings him into close contact with these things--death, suffering, injury, privation, exhaustion, etc.--and would that he survive, much less flourish, he is forced to become something deeper than he was beforehand.

    I enjoyed the article, and as usual, enjoy reading these threads.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Washington State
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Iain Is having some visa issues right now. Apparently he has been to the US too many times and now needs an “O Visa Classification”, whatever that means. If anyone in the tribe has insider pull, please let me know.
    Maybe Rob Crowley has some (warrior/lawyer) contacts he'd share. I'll ping him.

    Here's a link to one law group's explanation:

    http://curranberger.com/achievement-based/o-1-temporary-visa/general-o-1-criteria-requirements/


    Might be able to wedge Iain in somewhere though he may have already punched on this...
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor


    From Murphy: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GTFOTX!!)

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,593
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Iain Is having some visa issues right now. Apparently he has been to the US too many times and now needs an “O Visa Classification”, whatever that means. If anyone in the tribe has insider pull, please let me know.
    Maybe Rob Crowley has some (warrior/lawyer) contacts he'd share. I'll ping him.

    Here's a link to one law group's explanation:

    http://curranberger.com/achievement-based/o-1-temporary-visa/general-o-1-criteria-requirements/


    Might be able to wedge Iain in somewhere though he may have already punched on this...
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor


    From Murphy: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GTFOTX!!)

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    246
    When I completed my first Grading, having received my certificate and first red stripe I was called aside be Shihan Kellman the visiting instructor that oversaw the Grading. He then shared with me that because he had very poor eyesight he could relate to me a little bit having had to overcome his own physical challenge-He then went further and told me that I would think about quitting and when those thoughts crossed my mind I should not give up and simply continue training.

    I can barely remember how he looked and cannot remember anything he taught me when he visited my Dojo but every time I think about giving up I remember his words clearly.

    Shihan Chris made the biggest impression on me. He was the first instructor I had that when I saw him move for the first time I knew he could fight. That his experience extended past the competition floor and theory and onto the street.

    The first thing he did when he saw me was to grab a Kicking Shield and told me to punch as hard as I can. He then looked at me and simply said: "No Good." He then went on to explain that because I could not use my hips and legs I will never be able to punch hard enough to knock me attacker down/out.

    Next he pulled up the sleeve of his Gi and told me to grab & squeeze his arm as hard as I can. I can still remember how his face lit up and the huge smile that appeared after I grabbed him. "A-ha" he said. This is what we will work on. You will grab, rib and squeeze any part of the attacker you can get hold of while pulling him closer. The rest of the Casaku he or one of the other students would attack me suddenly (training my reflexes to react instantaneously) I would then try and grab on to any piece of the attacker`s body and try and hurt them. They would then tap me on the arm to signify that they felt pain-Shihan made sure that I did not relent in my attacks until I felt the tap.
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
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    MARTIAL = FOR FIGHTING. I reject the hippie martial fuckery of today and I suspect the old masters would agree. To quote Brent's instructor as related to me - "There is strong karate, and there is weak karate".

    He Came To Bring A Sword!

    Monday, September 05, 2016

    It was Halloween Night...1972 or 73. I chose to go to Karate than to go trick or treating. I was twelve...I think.

    I had been dabbling in Karate as an after-school activity. This was at the Burbank YMCA mid-week, and Saturdays. It was fast becoming a passion...or an obsession if you listened to my grandmother.
    I liked it.
    The instructors were good...but they were what we would consider hobbyists. They had their regular lives and did this to stay in shape and to lose weight. Truth be told, none of those instructors would be considered physically impressive by our standards today. But they had knowledge we wanted, and it was only $30 per month...so we listened and overlooked the warts.

    Then one night we had a visitor to the class.
    As soon as the stranger walked in, the black belts recognized him and all came to attention.
    They called the class to attention. The call was "SENSEI".

    We all faced the door in a very military manner and bowed.

    The man was "Sensei Bob". He walked over and waved us to join him in an informal circle. He had a last name but it has long been forgotten by me.
    He was different...he was not an Arnold look-alike, but he was clearly not a hobbyist. He was fit and did not have a gut. The best word to describe him was "danger". He seemed primed for movement. And at a glance he looked like he was very comfortable with a level of violence I knew nothing about.

    Barefoot and with his hair slicked back he bowed back.

    "Good evening", he said in a loud, but not overbearing voice.

    "Its good to be back".

    I later learned that "Sensei Bob" had been in Vietnam. This was 1973 after all. I never found out what his assignment was nor did I ever have the courage to ask...but as I said...there was an aura of violence...under control...but barely. Like being in a cage with a tiger that was not hungry...at that point in time.

    Then the tiger spoke.

    "This is the YMCA. That is good. The Young Men's Christian Association. That is what its called. But I will tell you that Christ was not a sissy. He did not come to bring peace and love and all of that drug induced nonsense".

    He had my 12 year old brain's undivided attention.

    "He did not - no matter what the sandal-wearing hippies will tell you in school or in church. He came to bring a sword. Yes...and next week....when I take over the training, you will all learn to use that sword to its best effects."

    He bowed. We returned the bow.

    That night changed everything and started an odyssey for me in the study of violence that continues to this day.

    Sensei Bob...wherever you are.

    OSU!
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    246
    It did not feel good to be told after almost 4 years of training that I will never be able to defend myself using my Strikes. After I had time to think about it I realized that the reason he was so brutally honest with me was because he cared enough about me as a student and that he wanted me to get the most from my training so that I could realistically and effectively survive an attack.

    Guiding me to work towards me strengths and away from my weaknesses. Telling me that I needed to work hard to catch up on the training that I have "lost"-studying the human body. Emphasising that I needed to find out for myself what hurt-weak/pressure points and the targets that I will be able to reach.
    That I had to use every spare minute and work a Hand Gripper to improve my grip strength.

    It was the first time that an instructor had made it clear to me what I needed to do to improve and had given me stuff to work on to survive an attack and not simply given me advice on how to improve my form to pass a Grading. When we shook hands at the end of the Casaku he looked at me sternly and said that he expected to notice a marked improvement the next time he saw me-Handing me the responsibility.

    One day while reading one of Geezer`s posts things just suddenly clicked. When he said that if you had to work around something-illness/disability that you needed to focus on the use of weapons. That the only empty hand techniques that you should use is to attack the eyes and throat, biting those targets if you have to while drawing your weapon. It suddenly dawned on me that while I was trying to reinvent the wheel Geezer had already than the heavy lifting for me. Having pressure tested what worked. That my focus should shift on how to use a Blade effectively.

    Although I never got to train with any of these gentleman on a weekly basis not even having met/spoken to Geezer I chose to listen to what they had to say and followed the training examples of the rest of the tribe. Developing a Combative Mindset and getting the training I need (Kali)-using Youtube and training by myself, not waiting for the training to come to me.

    Making the decision to get the most from my training and that is a choice that any Martial Artist can make no matter what their circumstances are. Most chose to focus on the training they think they are missing out on/simply going through the motions. Not striving for excellence.

    Cheers
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

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