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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Western WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    I think the American Hippy Culture has also infiltrated many martial systems 9more Aikido than karate but still)...

    I have trained with lots of people, good and bad. None inspire my desire to crack skulls like the smug aikido hippie. They are the Prius drivers of the martial arts world.
    3FFA4F62-1F75-45DE-8CD1-7F90130D22C0.jpg

    Very few instructors that teach openly have actually used karate in anger and thus theory never meets reality (and by that I mean in the real world for keeps to intentionally injure or kill another man).

    my karate instructor was a true thug in his day. He was a good guy but he had a chip on his shoulder. He had a special place in his heart for beating up Yakuza. The Tokyo police AND the local mob boss actually asked his mother to get him to knock it off. His mother told him that she couldn’t stop him, but she would kill herself in shame if he kept it up. Probably that was the only thing that made him stop.

    Brent...you know Ian. If we can facilitate his visit it would be a fantastic opportunity for all tribal members with a vetted karate background.
    Iain Is having some visa issues right now. Apparently he has been to the US too many times and now needs an “O Visa Classification”, whatever that means. If anyone in the tribe has insider pull, please let me know.
    Last edited by Brent Yamamoto; 03-06-2018 at 06:18 PM.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  2. #22
    As a point of historical perspective, the Jutsu->Do shift occurred generally during the Meiji restoration, during which Japan secularized and westernized, and with those social movements, the Samurai--who in the wake of the late Shogunate era of general stability and peace had largely become administrators--lost their final trappings of being a warrior caste.

    The martial arts of yore, meaning those from pre-Meiji era, or what is referred to as koryu--classical--predate this shift in politics and culture. All had their roots either directly from the medieval era, or in the DNA of their various progenitor arts, each of which had roots in the medieval era. Either way, there was no mistake to be made: they were the professional skill sets of a warrior caste, and had nothing whatever to do with 'self defense' as understood in the modern American context. There was no 'Mister Miyagi' about it, they were hard men, who lived lives dedicated to war, and had the scars to prove it.

    As a result of the conditions in which the martial systems were built, they centered around things that are considered 'impractical' for a ton of reasons. Nobody needs to study the disposition of troops in a battle line, or the methods of communication used to coordinate them by sounding whistles, firing noise arrows, the use of flags or banners, horns etc. We have radios. Nobody needs to study the art of tying up a prisoner with a fast-rope in order that he may be ransomed and/or interrogated. We have flex cuffs. Nobody needs to know how to build a sodegarami, or 'sleeve catcher', a tool designed to be used to safely and less-than-lethally detain an inebriated or enraged swordsman.

    But, certain skills are forever applicable. The human body only moves in so many ways, and it's joints and bones and nerve plexuses are the same, regardless of the century in which the body was born into. Men still carry their tools on their beltline. Men still arm themselves with Primary and Secondary weapons. Warriors still need to carry weapons into an NPE, and train to deploy them rapidly, suddenly, and without warning. Men still need to train their minds and spirits to the harsh rigors of violence.

    They were thugs. They were dangerous men, who had done dangerous things. They had, like all warriors, little patience for chicanery and bullshit and overblown ego. They sought The Truth, usually finding it in blood and steel. They were profound because they had done difficult and terrible things. Some may have sought spiritual enlightenment, but such was an accidental by-product of their austere and dangerous lives, which is a complete reversal of the Do-style of a practice dedicated from the onset towards enlightenment.

    When I was studying koryu, my teacher had used his skills against multiple armed attackers. His teacher had caused life-changing injury to many men, often in public arenas, one such instance in which he was challenged by a kendo-ka who inferred that Kendo was the true inheritor of the Japanese sword arts. He, having been raised in a dojo by men covered in scars from swinging actual swords at actual people, and he himself bearing such scars on his face and neck, took up a shinai and essentially said, "Oh yeah? Show me." And in an instant, the moment they met, he let out a great kiai, delivered a powerful attack, and broke his shinai over the kendo-ka's head and shoulder, knocking him unconscious to the floor. His teacher was a man who was missing an eye from a sword duel, and had spilled the blood of men with edged weapons in the service of his profession. The men who taught this man were consummate warriors, who had plied their trades on the battlefield and lived to tell the tale.

    The point is, as is so often stated here on this forum, there is a true warrior spirit that can be found in martial study, but it is found in places where grown-ass men sweat and grunt and heave and struggle, and where injury and bloodshed are bedfellows of that struggle.

    Personally, I do not believe that one finds spiritual enlightenment through trying to walk the path of others towards that end. I have only ever found it by being out in the world, being tried and tested by difficult and austere things, and being forced to look deep inside myself to overcome my own limitations and to digest the hardship around me. A warrior's path often brings him into close contact with these things--death, suffering, injury, privation, exhaustion, etc.--and would that he survive, much less flourish, he is forced to become something deeper than he was beforehand.

    I enjoyed the article, and as usual, enjoy reading these threads.
    There is no hunting like the hunting of man, and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never care for anything else thereafter.
    ~Ernest Hemingway

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Serenity
    Posts
    5,225
    Here is an article debunking the popular hippie martial arts beliefs regarding Kyudo which also infected almost all Asian systems to some degree:

    http://www.thezensite.com/ZenEssays/...of_Archery.pdf
    "Why should I trade one tyrant 3,000 miles away for 3,000 tyrants one mile away. An elected legislature can trample a man's rights as easily as the king can." Benjamin Martin, The Patriot

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    The Republic of Pirates
    Posts
    43,319
    EXCELLENT!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by noonesshowmonkey View Post
    As a point of historical perspective, the Jutsu->Do shift occurred generally during the Meiji restoration, during which Japan secularized and westernized, and with those social movements, the Samurai--who in the wake of the late Shogunate era of general stability and peace had largely become administrators--lost their final trappings of being a warrior caste.

    The martial arts of yore, meaning those from pre-Meiji era, or what is referred to as koryu--classical--predate this shift in politics and culture. All had their roots either directly from the medieval era, or in the DNA of their various progenitor arts, each of which had roots in the medieval era. Either way, there was no mistake to be made: they were the professional skill sets of a warrior caste, and had nothing whatever to do with 'self defense' as understood in the modern American context. There was no 'Mister Miyagi' about it, they were hard men, who lived lives dedicated to war, and had the scars to prove it.

    As a result of the conditions in which the martial systems were built, they centered around things that are considered 'impractical' for a ton of reasons. Nobody needs to study the disposition of troops in a battle line, or the methods of communication used to coordinate them by sounding whistles, firing noise arrows, the use of flags or banners, horns etc. We have radios. Nobody needs to study the art of tying up a prisoner with a fast-rope in order that he may be ransomed and/or interrogated. We have flex cuffs. Nobody needs to know how to build a sodegarami, or 'sleeve catcher', a tool designed to be used to safely and less-than-lethally detain an inebriated or enraged swordsman.

    But, certain skills are forever applicable. The human body only moves in so many ways, and it's joints and bones and nerve plexuses are the same, regardless of the century in which the body was born into. Men still carry their tools on their beltline. Men still arm themselves with Primary and Secondary weapons. Warriors still need to carry weapons into an NPE, and train to deploy them rapidly, suddenly, and without warning. Men still need to train their minds and spirits to the harsh rigors of violence.

    They were thugs. They were dangerous men, who had done dangerous things. They had, like all warriors, little patience for chicanery and bullshit and overblown ego. They sought The Truth, usually finding it in blood and steel. They were profound because they had done difficult and terrible things. Some may have sought spiritual enlightenment, but such was an accidental by-product of their austere and dangerous lives, which is a complete reversal of the Do-style of a practice dedicated from the onset towards enlightenment.

    When I was studying koryu, my teacher had used his skills against multiple armed attackers. His teacher had caused life-changing injury to many men, often in public arenas, one such instance in which he was challenged by a kendo-ka who inferred that Kendo was the true inheritor of the Japanese sword arts. He, having been raised in a dojo by men covered in scars from swinging actual swords at actual people, and he himself bearing such scars on his face and neck, took up a shinai and essentially said, "Oh yeah? Show me." And in an instant, the moment they met, he let out a great kiai, delivered a powerful attack, and broke his shinai over the kendo-ka's head and shoulder, knocking him unconscious to the floor. His teacher was a man who was missing an eye from a sword duel, and had spilled the blood of men with edged weapons in the service of his profession. The men who taught this man were consummate warriors, who had plied their trades on the battlefield and lived to tell the tale.

    The point is, as is so often stated here on this forum, there is a true warrior spirit that can be found in martial study, but it is found in places where grown-ass men sweat and grunt and heave and struggle, and where injury and bloodshed are bedfellows of that struggle.

    Personally, I do not believe that one finds spiritual enlightenment through trying to walk the path of others towards that end. I have only ever found it by being out in the world, being tried and tested by difficult and austere things, and being forced to look deep inside myself to overcome my own limitations and to digest the hardship around me. A warrior's path often brings him into close contact with these things--death, suffering, injury, privation, exhaustion, etc.--and would that he survive, much less flourish, he is forced to become something deeper than he was beforehand.

    I enjoyed the article, and as usual, enjoy reading these threads.
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,458
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Iain Is having some visa issues right now. Apparently he has been to the US too many times and now needs an “O Visa Classification”, whatever that means. If anyone in the tribe has insider pull, please let me know.
    Maybe Rob Crowley has some (warrior/lawyer) contacts he'd share. I'll ping him.

    Here's a link to one law group's explanation:

    http://curranberger.com/achievement-based/o-1-temporary-visa/general-o-1-criteria-requirements/


    Might be able to wedge Iain in somewhere though he may have already punched on this...
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor

    Upcoming classes:
    See you in Prescott 25-26 August for I2M.

    From Murphy: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GTFOTX!!)

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,458
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Iain Is having some visa issues right now. Apparently he has been to the US too many times and now needs an “O Visa Classification”, whatever that means. If anyone in the tribe has insider pull, please let me know.
    Maybe Rob Crowley has some (warrior/lawyer) contacts he'd share. I'll ping him.

    Here's a link to one law group's explanation:

    http://curranberger.com/achievement-based/o-1-temporary-visa/general-o-1-criteria-requirements/


    Might be able to wedge Iain in somewhere though he may have already punched on this...
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor

    Upcoming classes:
    See you in Prescott 25-26 August for I2M.

    From Murphy: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GTFOTX!!)

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