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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    7,868
    Just a wild guess, but I have had rifles do strange things if the metal rings holding the barrel to the stock was either too tight or too loose. This is the cheapest and easiest test for a noble WW II vet.

    Choirboy

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Made it to Free America
    Posts
    12,991
    Quote Originally Posted by MrGatoMan View Post

    I have a 2a1 Ishapore Enfield

    I think the problem is pretty obvious.....

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    NWFL
    Posts
    13,621
    Quote Originally Posted by choirboy View Post
    Just a wild guess, but I have had rifles do strange things if the metal rings holding the barrel to the stock was either too tight or too loose. This is the cheapest and easiest test for a noble WW II vet.

    Choirboy
    This rifle a little more modern in origin, but certainly it is not new. It dates from the 60's.
    The Rifle 7.62mm 2A/2A1 (also known as the Ishapore 2A/2A1) is a 7.6251mm NATO calibre bolt-action rifle adopted as a reserve arm by the Indian Armed Forces in 1963. The design of the rifle - initially the Rifle 7.62mm 2A - began at the Ishapore Rifle Factory of the Ordnance Factories Board in India, soon after the Sino-Indian War of 1962.
    The Ishapore 2A/2A1 has the distinction of being the last bolt-action rifle designed to be used by a regular military force other than specialized sniper rifles.[citation needed]
    One who hammers his gun into a plow plows for those who do not....Unknown
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  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,017
    It's a SMLE in 7.62 x 51, with improved steel to handle that cartridge.

    When the Brits went to the 7.62, they recalibered their sniper rifles-No. 4s-from .303 to save money. The No.4 action was already strong enough. The rifle was redesignated the L42A1.

    Bottom line is that the 2A was issued to those who did not get FALs, and was a heavy WW1 rifle with inferior sights in a more modern chambering.

    Also: the No. 5 "jungle" carbine was notorious for a "wandering zero," and this seems to plague many shortened SMLEs and No. 4s as well.
    Last edited by Papa; 02-27-2018 at 05:56 AM.
    Warrior for the working day.

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  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    The Mountain
    Posts
    75
    This rifle a little more modern in origin, but certainly it is not new. It dates from the 60's.


    The Rifle 7.62mm 2A/2A1 (also known as the Ishapore 2A/2A1) is a 7.6251mm NATO calibre bolt-action rifle adopted as a reserve arm by the Indian Armed Forces in 1963. The design of the rifle - initially the Rifle 7.62mm 2A - began at the Ishapore Rifle Factory of the Ordnance Factories Board in India, soon after the Sino-Indian War of 1962.
    The Ishapore 2A/2A1 has the distinction of being the last bolt-action rifle designed to be used by a regular military force other than specialized sniper rifles.[citation needed]


    These rifles can be turned into good shooters with a little bedding work, they were actually used in drill & ceremonies more than anything else and this one is the only one that I would consider using out of all the surplus bolt guns out there.
    There are many good deals out there on new bolt guns, but if you want to spend the time the Ishapore can be made to work.
    kato

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    931
    2A/2A1s are not .303 conversions, they are SMLE Mk IIIs redesigned and purpose built for 7.6251. I didn't know any were imported here. I first and last saw them as Bombay police rifles in the early 80's. Back then, they had a reputation for great accuracy out to 6-800 meters and were said to be a better choice for tigers or gaur because a missed or poorly placed shot could mean you didn't see your target again until your target found you (gaur are absolutely gigantic beasts and were reputed to be as smart and aggressive as cape buffalo back when they had faced hunting pressure). Of course, that was 40 years ago, and well, surplus rifles are what they are. There's no way anything escaped India without a lot of hard use. We're the most miserly/efficient people on the planet.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    169
    If you are okay windage wise, I'd guess you have a problem with the scope mount itself. It may be canted upward from back to front. If the mount was made for a No.1 MkIII, rifle there could be slight differences on the Ishapore that could account for such a problem. If you put a scope on it you can compensate for that by using the Burris Signature rings with the inserts in them. You can buy the inserts that will allow you to compensate for alignment problems such as off bore and height problems. As papa stated, the Enfield jungle carbines were rather inaccurate, but you are dealing with a slightly different beast.
    Last edited by ronlassit; 03-04-2018 at 12:30 AM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,087
    If this is just an amusing exercise, then carry on. We're men, and we like to be amused. Nothing wrong with having a little fun.

    If it's your only rifle, please go buy something modern. Say a Ruger American, or Thompson/Center Compass, if cost is an issue. Either one would be fine.
    Making the bad man go away since 1982.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    1,236
    If it is a scope mount problem one can always cut some shim material from an aluminum soda can and place them either between the rear of the mount and receiver, or at the bottom of the rear ring be tween the scope and ring. We used this when standard brass shims weren't available and we needed a long range zero for coyotes back in the day. Back in the day, sometimes our scopes just did not have the elevation we needed. Not often the case nowadays but it does happen from time to time.
    2 Samuel 22; Psalm 139:21-22

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    9
    Just a question. How high is your scope over the barrel? A dimension from the barrel to scope center will answer part of the question. Scopes on AR pattern guns are usually about 2.5" to 2.75" high. I know this isn't an AR but the scope is still some distance above the barrel.

    I'm just curious.

    Jim

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