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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    9,979
    I wish I had been able to make this one, sounds like my kind of fun.

    Mr. Anthony, now do you see what I mean when I said that security guard didn't bring enough people?
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,382
    Pistol Ground Fighting is more about ground fighting principles than it is about techniques. We of course teach techniques, but techniques by themselves don't hold up under all the different circumstances that the chaos of ground fighting causes. Principles, however, are universal. A thorough understanding of them allows you to apply the principles in all circumstances. Knowing technique helps, but the technique simply illustrates the principle.

    There are two fundamental principles of ground fighting:
    #1: Don’t go to the ground in the first place.
    #2: If you do hit the ground, get back to your feet as quickly as possible.

    Obvious perhaps, but it needs to be said. Those two principles are the pillars; every other ground fighting principal is subsidiary to them. Everything else is about the nuances and mechanics of ground fighting (as opposed to avoiding it in the first place).

    Other than the two pillars, THE MAJOR fighting principle is RELAXATION (and this goes for both standing and ground fighting). Relaxation is necessary for everything else to work.

    Relaxation does not mean being a limp noodle. Let's call it "combat relaxation" for lack of a better term. Combat relaxation is about using the minimal muscle necessary to accomplish a task. It keeps you from running out of gas and burning out too quickly. It also allows you to be more calm and to sense, through both seeing and feeling, what your opponent is doing. If you are tense and afraid, you will be too busy dealing with your emotions to see or feel what is going on. You will always be reacting to what he's doing, and you'll never get ahead of the game.

    Look at any pro golfer. Look at the Olympic athletes. Those athletes who are at the top of their game are clearly in great shape; they are fit and strong. But do they look like they're struggling when they move? (Weightlifters are an exception here, but that's a function of the weight they have to move.) The top athletes always make it look easy. Not because it IS easy, but because they are skilled and using the minimum muscle necessary to perform. They look relaxed...hell, some are even smiling while they do it.

    Everyone knows stiff muscles move slow. But if you're stiff, it also makes you SO much easier to beat up. It makes it easy to throw you on the ground, it makes it easy to get you into compromising positions on the ground. If you're tense, you won't know you've lost until it's too late.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,382
    I meant to ask the students to attend it but got sidetracked. What do you guys think about accessing a pistol in an ankle holster during a ground fight?
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    6,887
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    What do you guys think about accessing a pistol in an ankle holster during a ground fight?




    Anyone that thinks its a good really should try it in class. I can't think of an easier way to get the gun farther away from your hands and right into the bad guys hands. Short of maybe starting out the fight by willingly handing the gun to the bad guy. Ankle carry is basically that in a ground fight.
    Geek Warlord
    Dungeons & Dragons & Deadlifts

    Muscle Wizard Casts: Fist


    CRG-1 DPS
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    TWOTU since May 2015

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,382
    I always questioned the wisdom of ankle carry for a ground fight even befire I knew anything about ground fighting.

    I meant to add an iteration where students tried it, but after a couple days I think the answer is so obvious it’s hardly worth pointing out.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Snohomish County, WA
    Posts
    1,955
    Going through this thread brought back some very bruised memories!

    Just saw that 0-5 is coming back to WA, so will have to do my best to make it for that and another weekend with Scarface Sensei.
    The government selectively enforces laws, so I selectively follow them.

    RGF-3: December 2014
    CRG-1: March 2015
    CRG-2: June 2015
    CRG-2: June 2016
    PGF : January 2017

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    6,887
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    I always questioned the wisdom of ankle carry for a ground fight even befire I knew anything about ground fighting.

    I meant to add an iteration where students tried it, but after a couple days I think the answer is so obvious it’s hardly worth pointing out.
    Agreed. Very obvious its a bad plan from the get go.
    Geek Warlord
    Dungeons & Dragons & Deadlifts

    Muscle Wizard Casts: Fist


    CRG-1 DPS
    CRG-2 CRG x 2
    SGF-1 Shotgun Gunfighting
    Trauma care under fire
    Spetsnaz Sniper
    HRO-5 Terrorist & Active Shooter Interdiction
    HRO-6 CQB: Fighting in Structures
    CRG-4 Force on Force
    HRO-5 Terrorist & Active Shooter Interdiction - 3 day
    TWOTU edition
    Trauma Medicine for the CCW Operator
    Pistol Ground Fighting (Taint Shooting Progressions)

    TWOTU since May 2015

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,563
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    I meant to ask the students to attend it but got sidetracked. What do you guys think about accessing a pistol in an ankle holster during a ground fight?
    I actually kind of wish we had done some work with my LCR blue gun in an ankle rig. NOT as a primary (the odds of that working out seem infinitesimally small), but as a backup.

    Thinking back, I think there were a couple of times where shrimping through a position I may have been able to get to an ankle before I could have gotten room to clear my cover garment and get to my waistband.

    But I kind of doubt that it would outweigh the chance of the bad guy getting control of it.

    I think running an ankle rig during upcoming training time will be educational, if nothing else.
    ===========================
    Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,718
    Off on a tangent from ankle BUGs:

    I'm betting this PGS evolution also involved initial practice on how to fall without injury.

    The importance of this was brought home today as I walked along the gravel driveway, hands in pockets against the cold.

    A picturesque dusting of snow hid the ice I stepped on. When I hit the ground I was on my back. My hands were magically out of my pockets and my forearms helped break the fall. I was already rolling to my right side to get onto my feet.

    Momentary soreness left elbow, small bruise heel of left hand where my watch stem poked me.

    No decision made. Automatic response.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    No plan survives contact.




    2, 5, 6. And a wakeup.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,382
    We spent a little time each day on falling practice. But like any skill, a two day class doesn’t give you nearly enough repetitions to make it a conditioned, automatic response. The hope is that people take this stuff home and practice it.

    Falling well is especially important. Many of us will never get in a life and death fight, but virtually everyone will slip and fall at some point. It happens too fast to think about it, so that skill really needs to be engrained.

    I know a few people who’s excellent falling skill saved them from serious injury. And sadly a few who were not saved.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

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