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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    SO much for the old saying "They can kill ya, but they can't eat ya"
    All animals except man know that the ultimate of life is to enjoy it.

    Samuel Butler


    FACIEM TUAM, DOMINC, REQUIRAM

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Buckeye, AZ
    Posts
    434
    It reinforces the old adage that its the Indian, not the arrow.

  3. #63
    Join Date
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    Me, personally - it says, "Selector to 'Auto'." The dude has only ugly in mind and it may be aimed at me.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    May 2000
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    Beyond The Wall
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    45,876
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowman45 View Post
    It reinforces the old adage that its the Indian, not the arrow.
    The old adage is totally wrong.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #65
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    THE INDIAN OR THE ARROW?

    Monday, June 25, 2018




    We have all heard the analogy of the indian and the arrow. It is true, a skilled indian - or in this case "archer" - can do amazing things with less than optimal equipment...and we all hope to be that man. But the skilled archer with the best arrow and bow will be able to express his skills to a much higher level than if he was equipped with less optimal gear. I have a S&W 686 in my safe. It is the epitome of the police service pistol circa 1985. It went with me into harm's way for many years, and if it is what I had in my belt when I faced a trio of terrorists, I would be very thankful for it and go into battle smiling knowing that I would accomplish my mission well and artfully. But if I had a choice, and of course we all do, I would opt for what I am carrying now - a Suarez modified Glock 17 - as it would afford me the ability to express my skills with greater ease, greater safety, and for a longer time than my old 686. One big failing in American culture today seems to be an all or nothing mentality on things. Life is not that way. So if a guy enrolls in ten classes and brings a Kel-Tec or Ruger LCR with him, I would tell him to only enroll in two classes, sell that Zimm-wannabe gun, and get something that will allow him to fight better. The reverse is often the case...and we see him as well...the dude with a $3000 pistol that could not fight his way out of the morgue.

    And it doesn't need to be that way at all guys. A couple of analogies.

    When my daughter was on a rowing crew, the school needed a new boat and was waffling on going the cheap route and buying a less than optimal boat thinking the "great indians" crewing it would make up the difference. But that difference was greater resistance in the water, more weight, and thus less speed. We made up the difference to get the better boat and it made all the difference for them.

    Great rowers in a low quality boat, no matter how good they were, would NEVER be as good as great rowers in a great boat.

    Another analogy...this from pop culture. There was a commercial on Fox Business News (some sort of investment that I do not recall). It went like this. "If an Olympic cyclist on a racing bike raced a ten year old kid on a tricycle who would win? The Olympic cyclist of course. But put the Olympian on the tricycle and the race will be won by the kid on the racing bike".

    The indian may be more important than the arrow, but only very slightly so. The quality of the arrow, boat, or pistol either allows the man wielding it to express his skills to his highest level, or it fights him every step of the way, preventing him from being his best. So yes, be a good archer, rower, shooter...but don't cheap out on your gear, mistakenly thinking skill alone will help you hit the cowboy.

    So while one man might say the archer is more important than the arrow. We say that at the end of the day, the archer and the arrow are of equal importance.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    And with that, I'm still going with "selector to full-auto". As I said earlier, the dude in the OP has only ugly in mind. That means it's time to be better prepared and better armed.

    I'm old enough to remember the Mau-Mau uprising in Kenya in the 1950s. I also have the life experience to know that the potential exists for Antifa, or some other group (Leftist or otherwise) becoming the "Mau-Maus" of the early 21st Century.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    In a positive state of mind
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    A quick comment about the replies: read through them and you can see a lot of PC rhetoric there. Guys are pussy-footing around the possibility of saying something potentially racist. Fair enough since what we say (or write) can come back and bite us on the backside. BUT - doing that, having that mind-set also negates responding mentally at least to (second guessing) a perceived, potential threat. THAT gentlemen and ladies, ties in directly with the other thread about Antifa redirecting traffic for their own purposes. How many of the comments on that thread were about appropriate responses and compliance for fear of "over-reacting"?

    My point is if you perceive a threat respond to it. Justification? Multiple choice: past experience, training, fear, primordial survival instinct, or all of the above. It really is that simple.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Buckeye, AZ
    Posts
    434
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    THE INDIAN OR THE ARROW?

    Monday, June 25, 2018




    We have all heard the analogy of the indian and the arrow. It is true, a skilled indian - or in this case "archer" - can do amazing things with less than optimal equipment...and we all hope to be that man. But the skilled archer with the best arrow and bow will be able to express his skills to a much higher level than if he was equipped with less optimal gear. I have a S&W 686 in my safe. It is the epitome of the police service pistol circa 1985. It went with me into harm's way for many years, and if it is what I had in my belt when I faced a trio of terrorists, I would be very thankful for it and go into battle smiling knowing that I would accomplish my mission well and artfully. But if I had a choice, and of course we all do, I would opt for what I am carrying now - a Suarez modified Glock 17 - as it would afford me the ability to express my skills with greater ease, greater safety, and for a longer time than my old 686. One big failing in American culture today seems to be an all or nothing mentality on things. Life is not that way. So if a guy enrolls in ten classes and brings a Kel-Tec or Ruger LCR with him, I would tell him to only enroll in two classes, sell that Zimm-wannabe gun, and get something that will allow him to fight better. The reverse is often the case...and we see him as well...the dude with a $3000 pistol that could not fight his way out of the morgue.

    And it doesn't need to be that way at all guys. A couple of analogies.

    When my daughter was on a rowing crew, the school needed a new boat and was waffling on going the cheap route and buying a less than optimal boat thinking the "great indians" crewing it would make up the difference. But that difference was greater resistance in the water, more weight, and thus less speed. We made up the difference to get the better boat and it made all the difference for them.

    Great rowers in a low quality boat, no matter how good they were, would NEVER be as good as great rowers in a great boat.

    Another analogy...this from pop culture. There was a commercial on Fox Business News (some sort of investment that I do not recall). It went like this. "If an Olympic cyclist on a racing bike raced a ten year old kid on a tricycle who would win? The Olympic cyclist of course. But put the Olympian on the tricycle and the race will be won by the kid on the racing bike".

    The indian may be more important than the arrow, but only very slightly so. The quality of the arrow, boat, or pistol either allows the man wielding it to express his skills to his highest level, or it fights him every step of the way, preventing him from being his best. So yes, be a good archer, rower, shooter...but don't cheap out on your gear, mistakenly thinking skill alone will help you hit the cowboy.

    So while one man might say the archer is more important than the arrow. We say that at the end of the day, the archer and the arrow are of equal importance.


    Good point and well-stated. My point is a savage with an AK can kill you just as dead as the Special Forces operator who is dressed and armed like a modern warrior. Like most other things today, technology and equipment selection will have direct correlation to the user's potential lethality, so long as the user's abilities and mindset are what they should be. However, there have been those who found themselves in dire straights from discounting their enemy based on appearances and equipment.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    7,573
    I have often wondered if this wasn't some sort of African Glamor shots. If like that isn't like an auto mechanic dressed up. My brain goes weird places...
    Geek Warlord
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    TWOTU since May 2015

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by endsoftheearth View Post
    Man after my own heart. I left Africa before the change of government. If someone of tribal heritage was ghosting in my six while I was at the lonely ATM (just me and him). I would not settle down to my transaction until we were clear about things. That involved pointing the Glock 20 at him and saying "fuck off!" "Fuck off further!" Too bad for his feelings.

    Now if Dude #2 snuck up on me with a donut in his hand, I wouldn't turn a hair. I'd be fucked and completely surprised if he went after me. I'm a terrible profiler, I know. In SA I'd turn my back on white dudes all day long. Not even peripheral vision them. That may all have changed there, by now.
    Just so I’m understanding, you’re going to point a pistol at someone because they are of tribal heritage and behind you, without anything further?
    Last edited by JonathanNobody; 10-12-2018 at 08:41 AM.

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