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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    2,094
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nichols View Post
    I train to beat.... me. The me of today should be stronger and more skilled than the me of yesterday. If I strive to do this every day my enemy won't stand much of a chance.
    I used to think this way, and to a degree...I still adopt this mindset. E.g., from inside 10ft, I can reliably draw and hit a target in under .75 seconds (my best time up close is .60), so for those types of up close engagements I keep pushing to beat me because I know that there are others out there that are younger, more athletic, with reflexes of a world class teenage gamer. Similar with engagements from distance where I can "get the drop"...I try to open my workout with some type of exercise which requires me to make a hostage rescue head shot from 20yds or more...so I work at "getting off first" at those distances, realizing that if my clone were downrange, he'd be reacting quickly to take me out having the same skill at arms at distance.

    But for matters of tactics and such, I know my mindset a bit too well, so I work into my training the unexpected...I do drills where a "surprise reload" will be required, I work with a buddy to find some way to get into my head...I create a CoF that "just isn't fair" because as much as I strive to stack the odds that I'll be in a pro-active fight, the reality is that it's entirely possible that at least at the outset, I may find myself in a reactive situation. So I embrace adversity, I push to points of failure, and I keep at it because the reason I do all this is precious to me...I have a sacred duty to protect them, and I take that responsibility seriously.
    In order for the underprivileged and inept to feel adequate, the skilled and capable must be made stupid by decree.

    - Gabe Suarez, 12/13/2011

    If a broad ban on firearms can be upheld based on conjecture that the public might feel safer (while being no safer at all), then the Second Amendment guarantees nothing.

    - Justice Clarence Thomas

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tucson via Detroit
    Posts
    654

    Default WHO ARE YOU TRAINING TO BEAT?

    This is not mine, it's been posted across the internet for a while. I like the idea of training for a Black Swan, someone that is so far above where I am today or tomorrow that maintaining discipline in my training is not negotiable.

    Since you cannot control who you will run into, maybe it is prudent to create a template for a worst case opponent and assume that is who you will have to face in a fight for your life? Let's call him "Todd."

    Physical fitness? Discipline? Motivation? Todd is a former Division I-level athlete. He benches over 350 and runs an all-out quarter-mile in just over 50 seconds. Todd spends his mornings pounding out miles of hard roadwork, pumps iron like a maniac in lieu of eating lunch, and spends his evenings dry-firing his EDC handgun, studying ways to hurt people, and beating the hell out of his Spar-Pro and heavy bag. He maintains an extensive library of books and videos on combat and survival-related topics.

    He goes to bed tired but satisfied every night, satisfied because he has no other hobbies and because he looks at training as money in the bank---he will cash in his full paycheck on the fateful day that he faces you in a fight.

    Todd spends his weekends doing strenuous physical activities and competing in IPSC Limited or IDPA matches. He spends his vacations going to places like Crucible, the Rogers Academy, and BSR. Todd has no other hobbies and he is not really concerned with being a "weird, paranoid freak" in the eyes of many normal people. Todd does not really hang out with "normal" people, anyway---he prefers to hang out with people like himself.

    Warning of an attack? Deception? Good luck trying any Jedi mind tricks on Todd: he studies NLP and evolutionary psychology. Todd does not dress like some kind of thug, either: he knows that a clean-cut appearance increases his time/distance window of opportunity to ambush his prey. Pay very close attention to Todd's choice of boots, belt, and watch---they may be the only warnings that you get.

    Todd knows that anonymity is the most important weapon in his formidable arsenal. He does not threaten, he does not warn, he does not talk **** or insult---those things take time and telegraph intentions. Todd just makes a binary decision and then acts.

    Training? Background? Todd trains in the most effective fighting and survival techniques that he can. He is open-minded and non-judgmental, caring only that techniques fit within an overarching framework of logic and ruthless pragmatism. He lives his whole life this way---it is his structure, his discipline, his religion. Todd may have a black belt from Rickson Gracie, may have been a Golden Gloves boxer or a freestyle wrestler or a linebacker, may have trained in the famous Muay Thai gyms of Holland, maybe a student of WWII Combatives or battlefield jiu-jitsu methods. Maybe---and now the plot gets chilling (as Marcus Wynne describes in his books)---Todd has been the recipient of millions of dollars in government-sponsored training...money that was specifically spent to turn him into some kind of professional shadow-warrior badass, like John Macejunas or Kelly McCann.

    Maybe Todd is all of the above: operator, martial artist, fighter, contact-sport athlete.

    It does not really matter where he got his start, because he has synthesized his approach into a combination of very destructive, attack-oriented techniques that he can perform with maximal effort without much fear of hurting himself in the process. He can strike and he can grapple, and most importantly he always tries to hit first.

    Weapons? Equipment? This is the best part: trying to beat Todd in an unarmed fight is largely an academic exercise, because you will never, ever catch Todd unarmed. He carries a Glock or 1911, Fox OC spray, and a fixed-blade with him CCW every single day of his life. Todd is not interested in hitting you with his hands or feet---given even the slightest provocation, his opening gambit will be to present his handgun from the holster and to demand that you remain very still and quiet. If you then try to disarm Todd, strike Todd, or reach for your own weapon to attack Todd, Todd will not hesitate to shoot until slide lock.

    Todd also trains in ways to use his knife to great effect---maybe pikal, maybe more of a Kni-Com technique, maybe both. Names like James Keating and the Dog Brothers are very familiar to Todd.

    Todd will run you over with his SUV if you give him reason to. If you are more of a distant problem, he keeps an M4 or a DSA FAL in a Pelican case in the trunk, next to his trauma med kit and bugout ruck.

    Forget trying to get to Todd at home: his place is like a fortress, complete with crazy locks (Todd studies B&E, too), a large dog, and the ubiquitous Scattergun Technologies 12-gauge with Sure-Fire light.

    Remember that Todd likes to move first---his first move is to draw a weapon on you. Todd is not stupid. This isn't Bloodsport or a Sho Kosugi film. Todd wants to win...period.

    Todd sounds like a nightmare, doesn't he? Well, let's all take heart---while we cannot control whether or not we will ever have to face a Todd, we CAN control our own training and preparation. We can become "Todds" (!). Many of you probably consciously found similarities between your own lifestyles and habits and the ones that were described above. I think the idea is to imagine the most ferocious and skilled opponent that you could face in a nightmare, then try to become that person (within whatever constraints that you face). If you are not willing to become a Todd, then you need to ask yourself who it is that you believe you are training to face.
    Last edited by CDX09; 12-07-2017 at 02:24 PM.
    The biggest hindrance to adaptability is ego.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    6,674
    Quote Originally Posted by SigPro09 View Post
    I used to think this way, and to a degree...I still adopt this mindset. E.g., from inside 10ft, I can reliably draw and hit a target in under .75 seconds (my best time up close is .60), so for those types of up close engagements I keep pushing to beat me because I know that there are others out there that are younger, more athletic, with reflexes of a world class teenage gamer. Similar with engagements from distance where I can "get the drop"...I try to open my workout with some type of exercise which requires me to make a hostage rescue head shot from 20yds or more...so I work at "getting off first" at those distances, realizing that if my clone were downrange, he'd be reacting quickly to take me out having the same skill at arms at distance.
    Are you actively training to win a stand and deliver action?
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  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    3,337
    Everyone.

    I size up and beat everyone in my mind before I even speak to them. I look at combat like a master chess player would see a game. I plan 10 or 12 moves ahead before the game ever starts.

    I train to beat everyone.
    Isaiah 54:17

    Deus dea traballo, dixo o enterrador.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,232
    Quote Originally Posted by CDX09 View Post
    This is not mine, it's been posted across the internet for a while. I like the idea of training for a Black Swan, someone that is so far above where I am today or tomorrow that maintaining discipline in my training is not negotiable.
    Funny you should mention Black Swan - Gabe's post made me think of Antifragile.


    Don't plan for the little problems only, when the big problem can destroy you. Plan for the worst and limit your downside. So instead of your downside potentially being death, it is limited to a bit of time and money.


    There's also no upside to not training, but there is an upside to training. Competence makes you confident, and attractive to women. Strength and speed make life more enjoyable and probably longer. Manly activities like lifting and shooting and sparring boost your happiness.


  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,159
    Who are I training to beat?

    ANYONE that threatens and/or attacks me or mine.
    Yea, though I walk through the valley, in the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil, for I graduated from Suarez International's Ultimate Combat Skills Course.

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