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  1. #1
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    Default GUNFIGHTING AND NEUROSCIENCE: WHY USING YOUR FRONT SIGHT MIGHT KILL YOU

    https://www.tierthreetactical.com/gu...ight-kill-you/

    From the article:


    "Success in a gunfight doesnít depend on how well you shoot. It depends on how well you see. Unfortunately, everyone in the tactical and self defense communities trains endlessly on the mechanics of shooting, while completely ignoring the more important aspects of seeing. In this article we will review some new research that drastically impacts the basics of firearms training...

    SWAT officers consistently gazed at areas where a weapon would appear. This allowed them to fixate on the object in the personís hands for longer periods. This comparatively small difference gave their brain vital hundredths of seconds to determine if the scenario was shoot or no shoot.

    When researchers examined rookie officers they found they spent an inordinate amount of time looking at areas that tell you nothing. They looked at the assailantís face, around the room, and amazingly, they closed their eyes completely before firing in half of the scenarios!

    Researchers also found that rookies almost always looked to the sights of their gun prior to firing, around 84% of the time. You might think, great this is what they are trained to do! Well youíre both right and wrong. They are trained to do this, and this is what is getting them killed. In the study they were shot by the assailant 58% of the time!

    Less than a quarter of SWAT officers looked at their gun prior to firing. Their skill and experience allowed their quiet eye to track the subject throughout the presentation of their own firearm. This lengthened their cognition time, allowing them to make better shoot no shoot decisions."

    Click baity title aside, there are some interesting points raised by this research. What are your thoughts?
    "If you believe what you like in the gospels, and reject what you don't like, it is not the gospel you believe, but yourself." ó Augustine

    "That upon which you set your heart and put your trust is your god." ó Martin Luther

  2. #2
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    So someone wrote a long winded article about stuff we already knew. lol.

    Basically threats come from the hands, practice until you reach mindlessness with your actions and use the accuracy you need for the problem at hand.
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  3. #3
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    I've not (yet) hunted men, but I can recall several wingshooting moments where the surprise flush of a bird was followed by a shot and kill in which I don't even remember mounting the gun, let alone seeing the sights, so I certainly understand the premise of the article.
    Waitin' for a squeeze...

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  4. #4
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    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #5
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    Jul 2012
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    Good article. When will the "gun training community" catch up is anyone's guess. Maybe now that they can point to the scientific paper instead of giving that mean old Gabe Suarez guy credit they might start thinking about it.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2011
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    The problem with people today is that they still think there are all kinds of "new" ways to do things when in fact, most everything has already been done in one fashion or another. A lot of people simply can't manage to master the "basics" and yet they want to move on to what is called "advanced."

  7. #7
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    Dorkface said it. Mindlessness. That is the level of which to achieve regarding shooting and gunhandling. There should be no conscious thought involved when it comes to moving, drawing, presenting, and shooting. That is what frees up the mind to process the other information incoming. Like should I shoot this mofo or not.

  8. #8
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    My comments go to the article. It's poor, in that it engages in a bunch of sloppy thinking. To paraphrase: the experts move their eye such, therefore we should teach the beginner to mimic that. He's neglecting all of the other components of delivering a precise shot and of understanding when a shot is needed to begin with. Those latter factors are their own volume, but I'll tell you right now that there's far more involved than simple visual cues.

    Fundamentally, the author has confused cause and effect. He believes that the quiet eye is the cause of expert decision-making and shooting. It's not. What it is, is the result of training and experience that provides the physical skill to make a perfect presentation where the sights aren't needed to assure alignment with the target, the physical skill to manipulate the trigger so that said alignment isn't significantly disturbed and the knowledge base to recognize often subliminal clues that it is indeed go time.

    At the risk of being long-winded, an analogy: the pinnacle of jazz performance is the improv. When the jazz master takes off, he becomes the music, he flows and the what comes out is formless while still being perfect jazz. Shall we now take the beginner and have him emulate that performance? Of course not. That performance is only possible after putting in the work: the endless scales, simple tunes and ever increasing difficulties of tempo, range and so on. Overlay the music scenario to the linked article, and I think you'll see the sloppy thinking I alleged.
    __________

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Spade View Post
    My comments go to the article. It's poor, in that it engages in a bunch of sloppy thinking. To paraphrase: the experts move their eye such, therefore we should teach the beginner to mimic that. He's neglecting all of the other components of delivering a precise shot and of understanding when a shot is needed to begin with. Those latter factors are their own volume, but I'll tell you right now that there's far more involved than simple visual cues.

    Fundamentally, the author has confused cause and effect. He believes that the quiet eye is the cause of expert decision-making and shooting. It's not. What it is, is the result of training and experience that provides the physical skill to make a perfect presentation where the sights aren't needed to assure alignment with the target, the physical skill to manipulate the trigger so that said alignment isn't significantly disturbed and the knowledge base to recognize often subliminal clues that it is indeed go time.

    At the risk of being long-winded, an analogy: the pinnacle of jazz performance is the improv. When the jazz master takes off, he becomes the music, he flows and the what comes out is formless while still being perfect jazz. Shall we now take the beginner and have him emulate that performance? Of course not. That performance is only possible after putting in the work: the endless scales, simple tunes and ever increasing difficulties of tempo, range and so on. Overlay the music scenario to the linked article, and I think you'll see the sloppy thinking I alleged.
    Excellent!

    There is a term called backward planning. It begins with the desired result and then works its way back to achieve that through training. What do we want? We want the operator (yeah...I know the bullet golfers hate that term but I hate the bullet golfers so...) to be able to draw and kill in a mindless manner albeit totally justified in his actions. How do we get there from Bubba Billy just having bought his Glock 19X? That is the art of teaching...sadly...most Bubbas do not have the dedication, desire, discipline, nor commitment to achieve the end result. Neither do most cops or soldiers BTW...including some that act like they do or live in units that pride themselves on same.

    Nothing is free...the price for the MENTAL SKILL that Sam and Greg and Jonathan and Doza and Sua and, ever so fucking humbly, I have is risking your life over and over and over until you can kick a door and kill the men on the other side without a thought other than mission focus. You can get damn close vis-a-vis PROPER AND CORRECT training as Eric Tull is evidence of...but you will not learn anything of the sort otherwise.

    The thinking that goes into an article like that, and the modern American desire for the quick fix is why instructors tend to find other things to do eventually...out of a mix of frustration, exasperation, and disgust.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  10. #10
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    A quiet eye is a dead eye.
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    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

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