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  1. #1
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    Default HOW DO MEN FORGET HOW TO MOVE?

    HOW DO MEN FORGET HOW TO MOVE?

    Monday, October 23, 2017



    It had been a very long couple of days. My strained trapezius had been reminding me all day that I was no longer 25. And the humid Texas heat was a far cry from our dry Arizona heat. We walked into the Sushi place and downed a glass of water each before ordering the various Japanese sushi and sashimi delicacies. One member of our party had never enjoyed sushi before and images of the Terry Bradshaw commercial flashed through my mind. But after the thirst had been quenched and the first layers of raw fish had been eaten, I shook my head and asked the guys at the table - two long time staff instructors, a Navy Special Warfare operator, and a Surgeon this question.


    "How is it possible that men forget how to move?"


    I have been a fighter most of my life. Early on I was a Kyokushin Full Contact guy, a life long weight lifter, and a police officer in high risk assignments for 15 years. And since 2001, a professional trainer. Strength and the ability to deliver that via dynamic movement has always been a focus of my life. But in class I saw people - some younger and some older - that had no capability for any form of movement at all. And it was so evident that it could not be ignored.


    It became a very good discussion over dinner, and the gist of it was very simple.


    You lose that which you do not use.


    Stop using your capability for thought and your brain stops functioning.
    Stop using your muscles and your strength will fail.
    Stop moving and moving will become a foreign action.


    Look at the lead image. That is Seiko Toyama. He was born in 1928 and still trains in Uechi Ryu Karate. He has no issue with thinking, moving, or expressing strength.

    Why not?

    Because he does so daily.


    Let us all be like Toyama and reject the physically failing stereotype of the sedentary aging westerner.
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    1,113
    How?
    Because so much of what we do and how we do it is done from a seated position. I'm sitting as I type this. I sit in my patrol vehicle for a substantial portion of the day, even if I have 20 or more calls in a 12 hour shift, often driving 150-200 miles daily. Add in 30-plus pounds of gear and ancient injuries and it's easy to slide into old age. When I worked small contract towns I walked a beat, self-initiated, twice a day or more. That doesn't work in this assignment.
    As far as fixes go, they're on my own time. My agency specifically forbids working out on duty and refuses to accomodate it in scheduling. Not surprisingly, we have a fairly high membership in what they used to call the "blue button club."

    (Thanks for bringing this up, by the way. It's pissed me off and I'll use that to fuel tonight's lift!)
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa


    2, 11, 17. And a wakeup.

  3. #3
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    Its funny how sometimes people have the same kinds of though processes even though they haven't talked about it or anything that would suggest it. Last week Mr. Anthony and I were on the back back from the range discussing mobility, flexibility and capability. We both abhor the concept of being they kind of person that can't even easily get up or down from the floor though laziness.
    Geek Warlord
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    HOW DO MEN FORGET HOW TO MOVE?

    Monday, October 23, 2017



    It had been a very long couple of days. My strained trapezius had been reminding me all day that I was no longer 25. And the humid Texas heat was a far cry from our dry Arizona heat. We walked into the Sushi place and downed a glass of water each before ordering the various Japanese sushi and sashimi delicacies. One member of our party had never enjoyed sushi before and images of the Terry Bradshaw commercial flashed through my mind. But after the thirst had been quenched and the first layers of raw fish had been eaten, I shook my head and asked the guys at the table - two long time staff instructors, a Navy Special Warfare operator, and a Surgeon this question.


    "How is it possible that men forget how to move?"


    I have been a fighter most of my life. Early on I was a Kyokushin Full Contact guy, a life long weight lifter, and a police officer in high risk assignments for 15 years. And since 2001, a professional trainer. Strength and the ability to deliver that via dynamic movement has always been a focus of my life. But in class I saw people - some younger and some older - that had no capability for any form of movement at all. And it was so evident that it could not be ignored.


    It became a very good discussion over dinner, and the gist of it was very simple.


    You lose that which you do not use.


    Stop using your capability for thought and your brain stops functioning.
    Stop using your muscles and your strength will fail.
    Stop moving and moving will become a foreign action.


    Look at the lead image. That is Seiko Toyama. He was born in 1928 and still trains in Uechi Ryu Karate. He has no issue with thinking, moving, or expressing strength.

    Why not?

    Because he does so daily.


    Let us all be like Toyama and reject the physically failing stereotype of the sedentary aging westerner.
    Amen Brother.

    As a serious member of the “well seasoned” part of the Tribe, I could not agree more. The conversations we have on WT and at convival gatherings around dedicated serious training always help to invigorate my resolve to move with strength, agility, ability, and purpose.

    Thank you brothers and sisters!

    PS: Papa, l haven’t forgotten the warrior dinner event; it’s a must do.
    Greek
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor

    From Murphy: "If it looks stupid and it works, it ain't stupid"


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    AZ
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    This is very true. All the above posts are good. As Americans we dont use our hips much since we sit at tables and use chairs. This does translate to weakness, gait problems and lack of mobility in the hips. We are one of the leading countries in incontinence for a reason. We tend to get lazy. The average American is softer than baby poop. The concept of you don’t use it, you lose it is true for the most part. This was going to be a topic I was gonna write on in the fitness forum. How many people here just go to the gym and lift heavy? Do you have specific goals? Are you choosing reps, sets and exercises appropriate for those goals? How many focus on complete range of motion and complete muscle contraction? How many strengthen stabilizing muscles to help
    suppprt prime movers? How many do speed drills? Footwork drills? Coordination drills? Balance drills? Plyometrics? If the person chooses to work on his weakness instead of focusing on his strengths he becomes a better athlete.
    No soldier gets entangled in civilian pursuits, since his aim is to please the one who enlisted him. 2 Tim 2:4

    - I prefer dangerous FREEDOM to peaceful SLAVERY

    -Discipline = FREEDOM

    - Be HUMBLE or get HUMBLED

    - Cruce Signati

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TMAC View Post
    This was going to be a topic I was gonna write on in the fitness forum.
    Please continue!
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  7. #7
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    Oct 2003
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    2,989
    tl;dr: Lots of people never learned to move well and some of what they did 'learn' was wrong. Injuries and work patterns get in the way, and of course ego and sloth. Day to day life actively competes with movement training.

    "How is it possible that men forget how to move?"
    Many never really learned to move well, it's not "natural" to move with maximal efficiency, you don't just start off with perfect movement as a child and then forget how. When you watch children develop movement, they do so in fits and starts and many kids develop their own distinct movement patterns. It doesn't help that we often look to our peers--who are usually as dumb as we are--for this, and they've gotten information from people they look up to, who aren't all that good either. Think of the advise on squats to look up to go up. It puts unnecessary strain on your cervical spine area and only *marginally* assists you by keeping you from looking at your feet. But it's conventional wisdom in dumber weight rooms all over.

    I don't know how the military is these days, but in the 1980s we were just told "go run three miles". No discussion of stride, mechanics etc., just do it. This leads to inefficient movement and slow damage. I know I developed some REALLY dumb ideas on how to run when I was in my late teens and early 20s, mostly out of ignorance and hubris. Well, and a lack of access to trainers, or at least a lack of knowledge in how to access those trainers.

    Some of the advise we got was flat out bad. Static stretching is not only just useless prior to exercise, but can active HURT you if you do it wrong.

    Training through attrition doesn't really prepare anyone optimally, it just selects those who are good at it.

    Swimming is a perfect example of this. Those who've had swim lessons and been taught proper strokes move a LOT better through the water than those who thrash about.

    So basically a LOT of people never learned to move well to begin with.

    I think injury and proper recovery plays a part. Often times we either try to work through injuries we shouldn't, or we accommodate those injuries longer than we should, we skimp on doing rehab work because we *can* get back to work [1]. This means that "we" never fully recover, and it builds movement patterns that are--long term--really bad. As an extreme case of this, I knew a guy with a artificial leg from the knee down. He was WAY overweight and and never got the mechanical bit adjusted, so it dramatically impacted his gait. Which by now has almost certainly blown out his hip. I've got a REALLY tight something or other on my right hip/leg.

    You can *watch* people move closely and see this. I have a beginner in one of my martial arts classes who was a cheerleader back in the day. INSANELY flexible. Her right knee WILL NOT track over her foot, it constantly pulls to the inside. "You had a injury there, right?". "Yes, how did you know...". She did something to it, it hurt and she kept going. Now she needs to start actively working on stretching that back into shape or she'll injure it MORE.

    We have another guy who shows up on occasion who had his right (???) big toe bitten off by a monkey when he was a kid. That changes things some too.

    A bunch of people just stop being active during/after college. Too many other things going on (work, family etc.). Their day to day lives don't *obviously* benefit from exercise, so it's either a matter of aesthetics, or it gets let slide. Then they get into shooting a decade or three later, and show up at your class thinking they were just as mobile as they were in their mid-20s.

    And when they *aren't* the ego kicks in and won't let them see it.

    And also Dunning-Krueger syndrome either.

    As a couple have noted above, sitting all day doesn't do you any good--but it's more that we don't generally take a break every couple of hours to loosen up, and that once we're done sitting we don't do anything to counter the bad posture and shortened muscles. This is at least part of my problem, and I *HATE* the kinds of exercise needed to overcome this. HATE HATE HATE.

    Even non-desk jobs can leave their mark. People who stand all day in one place, but don't move around much, don't squat and bend, also get stiff and because their jobs tend to be even more tiring, they don't want to stand all day then go do work in the gym to break that.

    For some people stupid choices in their youth (if you smoke ANYTHING stop it RIGHT NOW. Carbon monoxide, a by product of ALL smoking materials, dries out spine cartilage, shrinking it and can lead to lower back problems including pinched/compressed nerves. ) with lasting effects.

    And lastly some people have always been bad at it. You can watch a gym class or see the kids on the playground and can tell the ones that *just* don't get it. Hell, I'm one, and so is my wife. On Saturdays we do a Western European Martial Arts class and there's folks half my age that move worse than I do--less flexibility etc, less spatial awareness etc.

    I think I should probably go roll around on the floor for a while and loosen up a bit.


    [1] Or because they don't want to go back to work. My mom used to Workman's Comp claim checks and was disgusted by the people who wouldn't do their rehab because they'd rather sit home at 2/3rds pay than go back to work. Some even WANTED permanent disability. I presume there's none of those here. Yes, some ARE on permanent disability because they can't, not because they don't want to.

  8. #8
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    Billy.... i love that you started your post with tl;dr and then proceeded to post a wall of text.... roflmao
    Geek Warlord
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  9. #9
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    I think one big factor at any age is your peers or the type of person you consider your peer. When I was a kid we weren't inside playing Nintendo, we were outside, working, hunting, playing army, boy-scouts, prepping for a sport, or just riding our bikes around. If we didn't keep up we couldn't have as much fun (think about the kids that wanted to participate but weren't athletic or strong enough). Growing older, while people my age were sitting on their asses in higher learning or entry level jobs, my peers were physically strong military personnel who turned out max or near max PT scores as part of their routine. Now, like most people my age, I sit in a cubicle for 40-50hrs a week, but my peers (Gabe, Sua, Mr. Anthony, Brent) are still killing it and I can't relate to those that aren't and don't consider them my peer.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nichols View Post
    I think one big factor at any age is your peers or the type of person you consider your peer. When I was a kid we weren't inside playing Nintendo, we were outside, working, hunting, playing army, boy-scouts, prepping for a sport, or just riding our bikes around. If we didn't keep up we couldn't have as much fun (think about the kids that wanted to participate but weren't athletic or strong enough). Growing older, while people my age were sitting on their asses in higher learning or entry level jobs, my peers were physically strong military personnel who turned out max or near max PT scores as part of their routine. Now, like most people my age, I sit in a cubicle for 40-50hrs a week, but my peers (Gabe, Sua, Mr. Anthony, Brent) are still killing it and I can't relate to those that aren't and don't consider them my peer.
    Good point. I work in HR and people think exercise is a lap around the hallway and think Im nuts training Muay Thai three times a week.

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