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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,112
    I would add a shotgun, reserve the G43 for NPE carry, add at least one other G19 and practice with all weapons at the available ranges. A 6920 is still useable in CQB, even with a 16" barrel, as long as you are aware of and compensate for mechanical (vertical) offset at close range. See Greg's posts (and others) regarding CQB with long guns in confined spaces.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa


    2, 11, 17. And a wakeup.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    6,667
    Quote Originally Posted by grizzlyblake View Post
    Thanks for the replies guys. It's nice to have Gabe, Greg, and Brent reply right out of the gate.

    To be clear - I did not address "need" at all. I'm just taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge here regarding different weapon platforms, training, and performance.

    I think I will be adding another G19 and G43, and potentially having both RMR'd. I'd definitely like to take a red dot pistol class. For the time being I'll be focusing more on pistol training.

    I'll have to think hard on the long guns since I accept that I won't shoot them outside the indoor range much. It wouldn't hurt to have a 6920 zeroed and in the safe for a rainy day.
    If you are limited to 25 yards with a rifle then the goal should be to put all the rounds in a tiny little hole at 25 yards. Doing that or hitting a target at 300 yards take the same thing. A mastery of the basics.
    Geek Warlord
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    913
    If you live in the country, there's got to be a gravel/sand pit, or a quarry somewhere you could wring out the rifles better than 25 yards. I definitely agree with the wisdom presented by everyone else. Absolutely the pistol will be your primary weapon when you're out and about and shit goes down. I also believe you should keep at the very least, one carbine.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    UNited States
    Posts
    108
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    When you get into a fight...it will either be the common thug in the parking lot with a sharpened screw driver...or some sort of riot...or active shooter
    ...that motivates me to wear armor too.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    The Republic of Pirates
    Posts
    44,892
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertGuy View Post
    ...that motivates me to wear armor too.
    I don't wear armor.
    Gabe Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,333
    Quick history side note. In the late '30s when the war was on but the US wasn't in it yet, the Army put on a trial for an armored scout car. Bantam entered a small, relatively fast all terrain car that had no armor despite the Army specifically calling for armor. Their justification being that nothing is 80mm cannon proof but mobility made their vehicle hard to hit. Their vehicle was fast and strong. It could go anywhere. It could get off the X. They won and the Jeep was born.

    Two lessons come from the Bantam Scout Car. First, be strong and fast. Moving and hitting first trumps the ability to take the shot. Second, don't trust the government. They awarded the contract to Willys and Ford to build Bantam's design. Bantam went out of business after that screwing.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,112
    And .gov still had scout cars built, too. All it takes is other people's money.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa


    2, 11, 17. And a wakeup.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    6,695
    The reality of our world is that the pistol is the gun you will have in a fight. So focusing your training on the pistol makes sense. That said, there is another reality: the pistol will not do what a rifle can do. It's worth an investment of time and money to set up a rifle, even if you just set it aside for an event that is less likely than a polar shift. Plus, rifles are fun. Work comes first, but guns can still be used for play.

    A rifle, chambered in a real rifle cartridge (including the so-called "intermediate" cartridges), with a 1-4/6/8x optic is a very versatile tool, even if you can't carry it AIWB. The Pistol Caliber Carbine is an interesting compromise, and may be well suited to your environment, but is not a substitute for a real rifle. If you've never experienced the performance, seek out an RMR'ed G34/35. They approach the performance of a PCC, but still fit in a holster.
    Virtute et Armis

  9. #19
    What are you considering real rifle cartridges?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    UNited States
    Posts
    108
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    85% Pistol work
    10% Shotgun work
    5% Rifle work

    When you get into a fight...
    That's a great way of describing the training for situations based on parking lots, riots, or other public encounter. What about home/property? Do the percentages change?

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