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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Southeast United States
    Posts
    487
    Quote Originally Posted by moses1moses11 View Post
    Field exercise: Take your "bag" then go walk 10-20 miles, camp over night, then walk 10-20 miles. Try rural, then urban, avoid convenience stores, "urban camp" and focus only on natural water and food sources. Try bribing locals for a ride (hitch hiking) and procuring free foods. It will be enlightening. Water, comfort, food & defense, keep the boots marching. 24 hour exercise then go home. Extend to 36, 72 etc. packs will change with experience.
    I'd like to see/read an AAR on such an exercise. It would be very enlightening.
    Redneck Zen
    "Be careful what you get good at."

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    444
    RNZ - I know your comment was directed at Moses, but I'll take a quick crack at this. First, you will start looking at things from the perspective of an ultralight backpacker *real* quick. All this redundancy that everybody loves - out the window. Instead of asking yourself, "What else might I need?" you start asking, "What must I absolutely have? and What can I do without?" It gets down to: Mobility (boots and fitness); Fuel (calorie-dense food that requires little to no prep, and hydration drinks); Shelter (sleep system and tarp - perhaps fire); Load Carriage (pack); Navigation (GPS/Compass/Map/light); Tactical (firearms and supporting gear) - pretty much in that order.

    That fully loaded happy stick? Yeah, you will be weighing that sucker on the kitchen scale and probably deciding that one spare happy stick is all you need. That G34 turns into a G26. Long guns? Well, let's just say those AR pistols start looking pretty good, but even like they may be overkill. Even the Blowout Kit starts looking like weight you don't need. You get the idea. Here's one for you. How do you carry and conceal a pistol in an accessible manner while wearing a pack with a hip belt? There is, actually, a great answer for that, but it's the kind of thing we tend to overlook until its time to go do stuff.

    By the way, terrain plays a *huge* roll with regard to how much weight you can reasonably move under and how fatigued you will get. Gaining elevation while carrying 40 or more pounds just absolutely sucks. Conversely, walking on a flat, paved surface (especially during cool/cold weather) let's you get away with more weight, or go faster with the same weight.

    Weather comes into play as well. I live in the hot, humid south. Trying to do work during the day in the summer time can get extremely challenging - even if you are acclimated to the heat; and most people are not.

    All that to say what I have already said. If rucking from Point A to Point B is anywhere in the radar screen, it is almost inconceivable that one would not load their gear in a pack and take a two-day, one-night walk. It can get downright funny at times. The last couple times me and a couple guys did this, we ended up weighing our packed out rigs the night before and texting back and forth trying to figure out what we can dump to get the weight down. As the reality of having to hump that pack starts to set in, your priorities start to change. Oh, and most people consistently grossly over-estimate their fitness level. It is a well established truth that the pack the feels fairly comfortable in your living room can absolutely crush you at the trailhead. Ask me how I know. (Must have something to do with the gravitational pull of the earth.) Someone else might be able to give you a start in the right direction, but you must, literally, walk your own walk here. This is a very individualized thing where your fitness level, knowledge, skills, and abilities start to interplay with external factors such as terrain, distance to be covered, weather, and threats - and *all* of this will drive the process. So one person *cannot* rely on another to tell them how it is - like shooting a pistol, head knowledge only gets you out of the starting blocks. After that, its all OJT.
    Last edited by Bloodnut; 10-03-2017 at 08:47 PM.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wild Wonderful WV!!
    Posts
    1,250
    Per the above:

    For me this is divided by mode of transportation! My own truck has more during trips than the family van! Air travel is the lightest with train in the middle somewhere.

    Traveling with a buddy I might go lighter if his truck is well stocked!

    SD
    Si vis pacem, para bellum!

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Once Free State
    Posts
    12,406
    HEAVY PACKS---hahaha I just watched "WILD" (flick about a woman hiking the Pacific Crest Trail). She starts off with a monster pack, that she can hardly stand with, full of all sorts of nice to have but way to heavy shite. By the time she makes it to the first check point shes in poor shape. One of the regulars goes through he pack and suggests what she might want to leave behind, unless she can give him a good reason to hump it.

    I find myself in the same position. Its waaaaaay to easy to add shite that you think you want, then wonder why you never used half of what you humped. Less is more when it comes to carrying it BUT then Ive spent a few cold and miserable nights where I wished I had "packed better". Its a balance and youll always be teetering near the edge.....

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    203
    Quote Originally Posted by EDELWEISS View Post
    HEAVY PACKS---hahaha I just watched "WILD" (flick about a woman hiking the Pacific Crest Trail). She starts off with a monster pack, that she can hardly stand with, full of all sorts of nice to have but way to heavy shite. By the time she makes it to the first check point shes in poor shape. One of the regulars goes through he pack and suggests what she might want to leave behind, unless she can give him a good reason to hump it.

    I find myself in the same position. Its waaaaaay to easy to add shite that you think you want, then wonder why you never used half of what you humped. Less is more when it comes to carrying it BUT then Ive spent a few cold and miserable nights where I wished I had "packed better". Its a balance and youll always be teetering near the edge.....
    Agreed brother.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    359
    Blood nut nailed it. For me I’ll add, 5-10 pounds of “quality gear” will get you most of the way, and in extra small packages. I so far don’t see many “need gear” items covered in many previous posts. Running away with out a sock or poop if you back or hand or smelling is a bad thing and kinda important after a day or two. Terrain and condition dependent footwear systems, socks, shoes/ boots, gatters, etc keep the feet, back and morale moving. Shelters for breaks/ cool downs/ warm ups prevent hyper/ hypothermia, rashes and unnecessary caloric load, also nice for morale, to shelter or camouflage, or stow gear for walk around a or restrictive areas (even just a simple gas station or store may not allow back packs orstowing of them. Cool clean water is absolute necessity and needs to be gained with out boiling (fire restrictions, smell, weight and time of fuel systems etc. A minor but major concern I see that drops dudes on hikes/ runs etc. is lack of minor OTC meds. Not 100+ pill jars, but 1 or 2 pro/ anti diarrheal, pain, stomach, iodine, caffeine, histamine etc. can make a bad day, kinda okay. Also phone charger, bag hidden cash, burner card, incrypted micro SD card of ID info etc in case of lost/ stolen wallet. lock pick alternative for lost keys. I’ll mention minus “guns” most of my work travel stuff is airport friendly for carry on.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Under the Black Flag
    Posts
    175
    Quote Originally Posted by EDELWEISS View Post
    HEAVY PACKS---hahaha I just watched "WILD" (flick about a woman hiking the Pacific Crest Trail). She starts off with a monster pack, that she can hardly stand with, full of all sorts of nice to have but way to heavy shite. By the time she makes it to the first check point shes in poor shape. One of the regulars goes through he pack and suggests what she might want to leave behind, unless she can give him a good reason to hump it.

    I find myself in the same position. Its waaaaaay to easy to add shite that you think you want, then wonder why you never used half of what you humped. Less is more when it comes to carrying it BUT then Ive spent a few cold and miserable nights where I wished I had "packed better". Its a balance and youll always be teetering near the edge.....

    I grew up backpacking with the Scouts, twice a month, every month, rain/shine/snow. Learned a lot. I have been cold and wet and warm and happy.... plan it, think on it, then go and DO it. Nothing works like the acid test....

    Every time I have put on a pack since then there have been things I learned when young and dumb.

    Edel... every time I grab the old ext frame Kelty I over pack the damn thing.


    I often (dry)hump a 60 pound voodo tac pack in the dark am while walking the dog just to remind me why heavy packs are no fun...

    Just go do it... you will learn things....

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