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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Southeast United States
    Posts
    432
    We've had great luck with 10x42 Nikons. They're not that expensive at a little over $200, but they do have some nice features. My wife even likes using them so much we had to get two pair. I'd love to get something nicer, but as Mikhail Kalashnikov said, Perfection is the enemy of good enough.
    Redneck Zen
    "Be careful what you get good at."

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    987
    I recently handled some mid-size, mid weight, Sig binoculars that were in the <$400 range. Bright, clear.

    I have the $350 Steiner bought six years ago. They work great.

    I have larger Nikon Monarch fixed 10x that while large are excellent for hunting--less so for scanning but more for specific identification.

    Here's one outlet's suggestions:

    http://www.opticsden.com/best-binocu....google.com%2F
    "... men and women of your armed forces America having signed a blank check to the protection of the American people and to the defense of our constitution, a check payable with their very lives, your military stands ready and confident to defend this country, this experiment in democracy. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, 9/11/17

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Posts
    60
    For lightweight ranging binos I use the Vortex Viper R/T. The have a mil cross hair with 4 ranging silhouettes. They have good optics and are not too expensive. I used them in Gabe's sniper courses and I carry them hiking. I have some nicer bigger ones, but they are too heavy!
    Don M.
    Scottsdale, AZ

    "Man's flight through life is sustained by the power of his knowledge"

    Austin 'Dusty' Miller, the quote on the Eagle & Fledgling statue at the U.S. Air Force Academy

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    2,374
    Quote Originally Posted by Sasquatch View Post
    I currently have some 20 year old Bushnell Legend 8x42's.....they have great glass but are HEAVY....IIRC approx. 30 oz.
    Looking for good glass, compact, lighter and mid range price. What has worked well for you???
    Thanks!! S. :)
    I have a similar set of Bushnell, 7x42 I think, that my dad got me when I graduated HS 30 years ago. They're my truck bino's nowadays. I picked up a set of waterproof, lightweight, Leupold 10x23's a few years back and added the Crooked Horn Outfitters Bino-System carrying straps. Put it on, carry it all day and forget they're there. Great for hunting and scouting.
    Waitin' for a squeeze...

    TWOTU Since March 2012

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  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    186
    I have Canon 10x42L IS stabilized binoculars. Once you use stabilized binoculars, you won't want any other type. They are beyond spectacular.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Once Free State
    Posts
    12,079
    I think you need to decide what you want them to do and over what terrain youll be hunting. I want binos that are easy on the eyes for long viewing IF overwatch is the mission. I want more power than my rifle scope if I'm sitting in a blind or hunting from a fixed position. I really do want the Leica combo bino/range finder; but stabilized sounds cool

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,191
    Vortex is almost always a good choice. They have an HD line that the visual quality is absolutely astounding.
    Isaiah 54:17

    Deus dea traballo, dixo o enterrador.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    106
    This all comes down to price range...as mentioned nothing beats Swaros, that's all there is to it but Zeiss and Leica in that dollar range are also good choices. The Vortex Vipers and Brunts (spelling) are both quality, light and do well for the price. Buddy uses vipers and my fiancee's dad has a pair of Brunts in his fishing bag we take along to spy on cool wildlife while we are on the lake. I had a pair of Meopta's I used for a long time and they were on the heavy side but great glass and quality everything else. I dropped them and chipped one of the eye pieces so I went to the Vortex HD line. For the price I got them they are good, they are solid, more ergonomic and lighter than the meoptas but the glass have a blue tint to them you won't find on the higher priced binos. It is a nitpicky thing but my buddy who runs the same set as me notices it in his as well so it gives us something to bitch about when we are on a mountain side looking for elk. Edge to edge clarity is very good though. Fiancee has a nice set of Nikons that have been tried and true for 12 years now, they are darker than the Vortex but again depending on how much you want to spend they are a good option.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    727
    The opticstalk forum is a great resource for researching what you want and best buys for all price ranges. A best buy for an inexpensive but really good all around binocular is the Leupold Yosemite 6x. You will read literally hundreds of positive comments about them even from optics snobs.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    186
    The stabilized Canon 10x42L blows the $3000 Swaros out of the water for handheld use. Your image is only as good as your ability to hold the binocular still on conventional binos. Everyone has a degree of shake that distorts the image. With stabilization, that shake is gone.

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