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  1. #1
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    Default GREAT DOCUMENTARY ON OKINAWAN KARATE

    Gabe Suarez

    To each there comes in their lifetime a special moment when they are figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing,
    unique to them and fitted to their talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds them unprepared or unqualified for that which could have been their finest hour.


    ― Winston Churchill


    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
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    Cool.

    They do a good job showing how the traditional form differs from competition.

    I love the bit where the sensei tells the Italian student to take his belt off. "No time to adjust your belt in a fight." Zero bullshit and not even bothering with a gi. Love it.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  3. #3
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    Wonderful. I study an Okinawan style myself, this really captures a lot of the essence of the art.
    Last edited by Mike OTDP; 06-03-2017 at 06:12 PM.

  4. #4
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    Look up youtube videos of Taika Oyata, unfortunately dead now. He was the real deal.

  5. #5
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    Ever plan to visit/study in Okinawa, Brent? How similar is this stuff to what you teach?
    LIVING > FIRED > JAIL > DEAD

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by WinstonSmith View Post
    Ever plan to visit/study in Okinawa, Brent? How similar is this stuff to what you teach?
    I would like to visit sometime. It would be cool to say I've been there and visited some of the spots. But from a training perspective, I get more out of bringing someone here to the US. We've done that a handful of times.

    The stuff in the video is the same but different from what I do. It's very interesting to me how much variation there is in Karate, just on this tiny island. It's all Karate and much of it looks the same, but the methods can be vastly different.

    The foundation of all Karate is kata, as was shown in the video. If you really understand kata, you understand Karate, and you understand how to fight. Different branches of Karate often practice the same kata, but take very different lessons from it.

    In the big picture, Karate can be broken down into three parts:


    Kihon - fundamentals. Most people think of these as "basics" but that implies they are simple. Kihon includes all the stances, strikes, blocks, kicks, etc. But it also includes really fundamental things like structure, relaxation, breathing, etc. It would also include the body conditioning exercises such as punching makiwara, hitting each other, smashing stuff to condition your bones, etc. Everything else is built on Kihon.

    Kata - the blueprints of Karate. Kata incorporates Kihon into logical sequences. Each Kata has different lessons to teach. Power can be generated a variety of ways and the primary Kata illustrate different methods. Each Kata also show different strategies/tactics, something that is far deeper than the simple techniques that everyone can see. Fundamentally, the Kata teach you how to move, how to control your body, and how to apply the different techniques against an enemy.

    Kumite - fighting. People think of Kumite only as free sparring but any variation of partner drills is essentially Kumite. In the gun world, we have Force on Force...that is a variation of Kumite.

    What I see in most Japanese Karate is that these three fundamental building blocks are almost separate branches of study. Kata are seen as something to do for belt tests or tournament performance. And when they spar, it looks nothing like kata. Tournament fighting is NOTHING like what is shown in Kata. Kata and Kumite are totally different in this view.

    In Okinawa Karate (at least with what I do), Kata and Fighting are the SAME. Fundamentally, that's what I see is the same with what I do and what I saw in this documentary.

    I've trained with one guy from Okinawa who is the real deal. I'll try to post something about him tomorrow.

    Now I'm off to the dojo to do some Jujutsu. :)
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

  7. #7
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    Kumite has many faces. Its highest culmination is not the stuff you see in a karate match. If you can't do the technique in a business suit, its not really karate. And neither is brawling karate.
    Gabe Suarez

    To each there comes in their lifetime a special moment when they are figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing,
    unique to them and fitted to their talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds them unprepared or unqualified for that which could have been their finest hour.


    ― Winston Churchill


    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  8. #8
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    Interesting story of a former J.C.P.D. narcotics cop who kicked many asses. There are many good fighters that came out of the Jersey City and Bayonne schools.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Hugh_Nagle
    kato

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