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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    3,509
    At 62, not having lived responsibly, it's hard to start aging responsibly.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,154
    Right on Gabe, killing it! I as well focus on the big 3 and everything else supplements those lifts. Since I've focused on those lifts, going as heavy as I can, my strength went through the roof. I was an all American athlete in college and I am stronger and in better shape at 43 than I was in my young 20's. Brothers, it works. Just do it.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pineland, USA
    Posts
    136
    I reject the premise of the OP that you will ever reach a point of not being combat fit, or effective, as long as you are doing your part. This statement seems to be based on the premise that at some point, a loss of one attribute or another will negate your ability to fight. I think a better way of approaching the subject is to ask how do you compensate for declining physical abilities with increased attributes in other areas. Gabe answered this in one way with increased emphasis on more firearms work. I think this is a very good example of leveraging tools to defeat an opponent with superior physical strength. And, being able to legally justify it by disparity of force.

    As to the actual physical decline, I found it actually started in your 30's. And it goes on every decade. If you do nothing, yes it will degenerate into absolute combat ineffectiveness in short order. But you get a vote in that process as well. I think there are people out there in their 20's, 30's, & 40's that are in shit shape. There are also people out there in their 50's, 60's, and 70's that could probably kick your ass.

    I recently did the winter Fan Dance on the Pen-Y-Fan in the Brecon Beacons. I ended up rucking with a 72-yr old former SAS officer. He does the Fan Dance every year. That's pretty fucking impressive.

    I think the mental mindset makes such a big difference here. The idea that you need "parity" with your opponent, like weight classes in MMA is missing the point. Of course, on the face of it, a bigger, stronger opponent has the initial advantage. But just because I'm older and perhaps weaker than my opponent does not necessarily mean I'm fucked, without any chance of winning. I will leverage anything in my environment to kill any motherfucker trying to kill me or others.

    With that being said, I think you should strive to stay in the best shape you can, to give you the best chance of prevailing in any encounter. But you shouldn't just give up and think you don't have any chance just because you have gotten older. Or that there is a set point where you are combat ineffective. I say go down fighting regardless of perceived outcome.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    45,433






    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Snohomish County, WA
    Posts
    1,896
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    At 62, not having lived responsibly, it's hard to start aging responsibly.
    I'd say you are doing good. You were kicking ass in the pistol ground fighting class!
    The government selectively enforces laws, so I selectively follow them.

    RGF-3: December 2014
    CRG-1: March 2015
    CRG-2: June 2015
    CRG-2: June 2016
    PGF : January 2017
    0-5 Feet: October 2018

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,641
    Age and Combat Fitness

    Wow, what a great thread to leap into. Here I am, chronologically wedged between Bill the Vet and JMoore in my 7th decade, recovering from a karate injury, missing my Crossfit WoDs, and restricted for months from my off-day sprint sessions. Repaired, hopefully, but grumpy about the delay. ;-}

    Some thoughts from the horizontal recovery typing position:

    Age and combat fitness are as much a mental fitness and mindset as they are physical strength, flexibility, and endurance.

    Consistency is fundamental. When, not if, you have a setback, get back in gear as smoothly and swiftly as you can. I started weight training in high school, kept up well until I left the Marines.Between 45 and 65, I slacked off on heavy lifting. Bad idea. Back to heavy lifting in Xfit and karate at 66 was the answer and it has been producing great benefits.

    Old saying: “Anything worth doing…is worth OVERdoing”. We’re all inclined to overdo. Use your ever-increasing level of judgment to become more effective and efficient, not just more something.

    Keep updating your combat mindset and how to achieve it. Gabe put it quite clearly: “The older you get, the more aggressive in starting things you must become. Closer to the act of pressing the trigger than to blocking the punch. There is more to it of course but that is a start.”

    Train to augment your capabilities, enhancing what you CAN do. Don’t focus on limitations; find new ways of doing things.

    Work to become more ambidextrous. Try everything. Work left and right sides with things like MA, dance, juggling, shooting, guitar, piano, typing. They will improve your fitness, coordination, balance, and cognitive processing. Some may notice subtle cognitive process changes earlier, some later, some very little. Activities like these can delay or minimize these changes. Keep doing challenging things.

    It’s always about the company you keep. My friends and training partners range in age from about 15 to almost 80. Most are younger than I am, but that goes without saying.

    Don’t “retire”, ever. Keep moving at speed and finish going flat out in a pile of life experience brass surrounded by a cloud of self-generated life-smoke.

    Get a data sheet from Gabe’s 57th year State-of-Fitness (ht, wt, DL, BS, BP, Farmer Carry, sprint workout, etc.) and work toward that; it’s a great goal, no matter your age.

    A tremendous Tribe to be part of, thank you all.
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor


    From Murphy's Laws of Combat: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GTFOTX!!)


  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Suburb of Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    1,096
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    At 62, not having lived responsibly, it's hard to start aging responsibly.
    Quote Originally Posted by steve_k View Post
    I'd say you are doing good. You were kicking ass in the pistol ground fighting class!
    Yes he was.
    Suarez International Staff Instructor, Iowa

    "EVERY MAN IS A COUNTER TERRORIST." --Gabe Suarez
    "It's not the will to win that matters--everyone has that. It's the will to prepare to win that matters." --Paul "Bear" Bryant
    "Love of theory is the root of all evil." --William M. Briggs

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    895
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    I've just been powerlifting for a few months. Trying to map what I'm being coached to the squats I see at the end. I'm being pushed to get my hips below my knees on the squat depth. Is that good practice? I realize my coaches are ultimate all about competition (and I'm not). So wondering if meeting the competition depth standard is actually bad for longevity etc.

    http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsl...ce/novice.html
    Last edited by gssc; 02-05-2017 at 09:07 AM.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    45,433
    GSSC,

    The main things to remember, and I am sure plenty of guys here can add more is that PL is a sport, and the sport rules may or may not be applicable to you.

    Next, that the squat and the dead are different lifts. The dead is a hinge (something old people have trouble with if they have lived a life of gradual decline), the squat is a squat. Not all lifts may work for all people. I stopped heavy benching about eight years ago because every time I benched my shoulders were painful for a week. I switched to weighted dips and not only did my chest development improve but my shoulder stopped hurting. My last heavy session with dips was 150# for three. Lifting is not supposed to hurt in the bad way.

    There is a difference between injured pain and muscle soreness pain. If you are getting the former, something is wrong. Modify the lifts to suit your body and leverage. I tried the standard dealift for years and it was very hard for me to do. I finally pulled 400 but it was a chore. When I switched to this method shown...a narrow stance sumo (aka Squat Stance deadlift) my weight went up ridiculously. To quote Staffer John Chambers...there is a fine line between hard and retard.

    Recovering from the training day becomes even more important. If you are supposed to do a heavy day but you are still sore from the last one, what you need is a day off not pushing through and injuring yourself.

    And eating...eat like a warrior not like a fat old fart. Protein, protein, protein. Forget what the fat cardiologist tells you or what the 300 plus Rosanne lookalike nutritionist says. Proetin and fat are the key to ageless badassery. Carbs only around the workout to fuel it. Only fat guys and fat chicks eat dessert regularly, and only fat f*cks drink to excess.

    While I don't necessarily want to look like Ripptoe, he has some very good advice on squat and deadlifting on YT.





    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    45,433
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

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