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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Northern CO
    Posts
    200
    For a burner I have this one:
    http://www.alloutdoor.com/2015/01/05...kking-cookset/

    (Just the burner, hard to find a review that wouldn't put someone else's store on Gabe's site) I use it for winter in the Front Range and it's the stove in the pack in my car as well. I like the small handle on the simmer ring as it allows adjustment even if the stove is already hot without burning my fingers. It has warmed a lot of tea & hot cocoa water on snowshoe and XC ski outings

    I also use a MSR Pocket Rocket in the summer. You have to keep the canister inside your coat for winter use. But 3 season it is fast, easy, and plenty of heat. Boils a couple of cups of water under 5 min at 10,000' The downside is that wind affects it more than it affects the Whisperlite. The stove itself is only 4 oz. though so for the "fast & light" part it really shines. Canisters weight more than the stove but you can stay pretty light.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    N. AZ
    Posts
    1,786
    Mine is and always will be the swiss volcano stove with triox. Wood in a pinch

    http://chazzlayne.com/feature-the-swiss-army-stove/
    Last edited by ericb; 01-24-2017 at 03:40 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    368
    In my experience, it depends on how fast you want to cook or boil water. Alcohol stoves do not put out the heat that the Pocket Rockets do using isobutane. I have a pocket rocket, and a whisperlite. I got rid of my alcohol stove years ago. I use the windshield from the whisperlite with the pocket rocket when it is really blowing. The pocket rocket, an isobutane can and a collapsible base all fit in my titanium cooking kit and last at least a full weekend of camping.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Western Washington
    Posts
    115
    Years ago in Scouts I had a bluet Isopropanol stove. I always wanted an MSR wisperlite and in 99 after the Corps and getting a better paying job I bought a MSR Dragonfly. Still have it, but it doesn't get much use as we mostly do car camping.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    UNited States
    Posts
    88
    What will you be cooking? Or just boiling water? Altitude?

    If I'm cooking with a pan, I want wide and low.
    I prefer liquid fuel so I can measure or tell how much I have left.

    All other, I prefer to heat boiling water as fast as possible, simple, minimal fuss. There's things I like about MSR and things I like about Jetboil.

    Freeze dried? I just rehydrate by soaking in water. SIMPLE.
    I am "homeland security", "border patrol", "law enforcement", "first responder", and a "veteran" of the mentioned.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    483
    Have had an earlier version of this for many years - Optimus Multi-fuel:

    https://www.optimusstoves.com/us/us/4-8016277-optimus-nova-plus

    8016277_nova-plus_open.jpeg

    Just great, run it on gas or Shellite (burns very clean).

  7. #27
    I know this is an older thread but thought I would add my experience. I hike backcountry quite often and have used several types and brands of stoves. The multi fuel stoves are great for when I am with larger groups or traveling in a canoe or atv. I use the optimus nova plus listed above. The nova plus is slightly quieter than the MSR Whisper Lite and it adjusts way better allowing you to simmer. For when its just me or a buddy hiking in I use the Optimus Crux set. This is a canister fuel stove that is extremely lightweight and the stove folds down and fits in the bottom of the canister. I bought the set that includes the pot with the diffuser on the bottom to conserve fuel and heat faster. Really I can't say enough about this little stove. It works perfectly, its lightweight and burns efficiently. I carry it in my patrol truck to make coffee when in the backcountry. A good friend of mine recently sold his whisper lite and another multi fuel stove and uses his optimus crux exclusively on average 10 days a month. If you have any other questions about this stove or the Nova Plus let me know.

  8. #28
    Philip Asay is offline Suarez International Staff Instructor - Alaska
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    172
    Check out the Jetboil line, I really like mine, fuel canister and burner fit inside of pot for convenient compact package.
    Suarez International Staff Instructor - Alaska
    State of Alaska, Certified CCW Instructor
    Glock Certified Advanced Armorer

  9. #29
    I like the concept of the jet boil but it's a single use stove. With the Optimus crux you can boil water like the jet boil then throw a pan on it and scramble eggs. Unless you like boiled eggs for breakfast... I used to have a jet boil but the Optimus took its spot with their pot combo. It seems to boil water just as quick and efficiently.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,214
    If you go with a wood burner make sure you keep some trioxane bars in the pack. It's nice making coffee on a twig fire and all that, but when the weather doesn't like you and it's time to put calories down your pie hole you want that backup plan of never fail.

    I have an old school alcohol burner and one of those ultra light fold ups that burns the bars. Simple is good.

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