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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Default A New Perspective on CQB

    Iíve seen a number of threads that touch on CQB and Urban Combat that bear a moment of consideration. The new perspective is this, space. What CQB and OUT (operations in urban terrain), really is, is the ability to make small spaces as large as they can be.

    In CQB/OUT you are restricted to small places, rooms, hallways, streets, alleys. We arenít babies so tight spots arenít comfortable or comforting. We want to move, adjust, stay mobile, and avoid. In urban terrain that may not always be feasible. So what we are left with is the utilization of the room we are left with. This requires the ability to think and plan. My only motto on CQB is that itís a thinking manís game.

    One of the main considerations is gear selections. You need to structure your weapons and equipment around smaller spaces. Dual mag pouches become singles, side loaded gear begins to be housed front and back, even gesticulations become more curt and severe. You have to get smaller. It is a fact of space, to be more effective, more fluid, more mobile, everything has to become smaller.

    Loadouts, gear, medical equipment, all gets dropped for more flexible, adaptive gear that has multiple purposes. Multi tools over tool sets, bleeder kits over trauma kits, dropping white lights and going with chem lights, all of these options reduce space. Packs, belts, chest-rigs, even holsters take space. The only way to accommodate is to reduce your load.

    So, how do you reduce your load without sacrificing effectiveness? First, consumables, breeching devices, once these are used leave them behind. Once through the door drop them. Speed becomes your security and you flow through the structure. Next, ammo, inside a structure there really isnít fire and maneuver. You engage targets as they appear and make themselves known. This is especially prevalent in defensive issues. In a proactive situation, Iíve never made more than 2 proactive reloads, therefore I only carry a maximum of 4 spare mags outside of the one in the primary weapon system and an additional 2 for the secondary platform.

    What this allows me to do is contain my ammunition either on a simple battlebelt configuration, simple chest-rig, plate carrier, or shoulder bag. Now there are some tools of the trade that help in this mission. Chem lights, door stops, chalk, mirrors, and spare white lights. All of these items can be stored in pockets, spare rear bags, and molle loops. As a general rule of thumb you want your fighting gear on your front and support gear on the back of your equipment, including your comms. I donít advocate any items that increase your horizontal profile. I would like even your secondary weapon platform on your front, centerline profile.

    Elbows should be tucked inside the profile of your rib cage at all times. Dump pouches, holsters, mags, flash bangs, bleeder kits, and comms, should be mounted either front or rear as applicable. I understand that thigh rides are all the rage, Filling up your molle is the thing to do and that all the TV/movie combat ninjas have this cool highspeed laser guided heat seeking gear strapped all over their persons buy all it does is increase your profile, reduce your space, and announce your presence before you want it to.

    The trick is to optimize your space, tight, light, efficient will win the day. If you donít believe me come to class and Iíll prove it balistically with UTMs.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Midwest
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    2,399
    Wow. Reading this took me straight back to the 2014 CQB/TT combo class in Iowa, taught by Greg and assisted by Brent. I think it was the first class of it's sort that Greg put together. I still believe I got more from that class without firing a single live round than any other SI class yet. As Greg writes above, you had to learn how to "get small" and "get skinny" in order to keep moving, and movement is life in CQB.

    You hear this a lot on WT- that you have to attend the classes to really learn the material. Well, it's true... and it's especially true of CQB, I think. You could read Greg's post above until you have it memorized, but it's no substitute for physically learning what works and what doesn't in a live class. (As I'm sure it's similarly true that the training class is no substitute for the real thing, but I'll have to defer to the BTDT crowd on that note.)

    Sign up for the class. Take everything you've got- pistol, shotty, AR, M4 PDW, Glock PDW, bullpup, etc.- and run every support rig you've got- battle belt, chest rig, shoulder bag, etc.- and learn (not read) what works and what doesn't. As Greg says, "You'll never look at any building the same way again."
    Waitin' for a squeeze...

    TWOTU Since March 2012

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tucson via Detroit
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    567
    Based on your post, is this for a lone individual clearing a structure or a group (I'm aware you never want to do it alone).

    Would anything change if you're operating within a group or by yourself?

    Where would you place your first aid kit with tourniquet in this configuration?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The biggest hindrance to adaptability is ego.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Phoenix, Arizona
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    9,423
    Quote Originally Posted by CDX09 View Post
    Based on your post, is this for a lone individual clearing a structure or a group (I'm aware you never want to do it alone).

    Would anything change if you're operating within a group or by yourself?

    Where would you place your first aid kit with tourniquet in this configuration?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Anything unrelated to causing damage I want behind my hip, a TQ does you no good if you have a hole in it, same with comms.

    When working individually I want to diagnose the problem. How big is the structure? How many possible enemies? Do I know the floor plan? The less I know the heavier I will tend to get, meaning more ammo, heavier armor, more equipment. The entire thing is a balancing act on caring for yourself and caring for your momentum and flow inside the structure.

    When operating in a group over as an individual I'm going to be able to move slower and still be as effective because I only have to cover half the space in a room or less. I'll opt for more armor, more support gear, and less ammo. In essence by just adding one more person you can move twice the speed, without sacrificing safety, with half the effort.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Made it to Free America
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    13,286
    Excellent post! Im working reeeeely hard with another officer to get him understand he doesnt need to carry as much gear as a AFV. Hes wearing steel plates because they were cheaper that ceramic (dont ask-at least he has plates....) Now he wants to add pouches all around for gear that he already carries on his duty belt. He wants extra TQs and Izzy bandages and a breaker bar and and and. He not SWAT (probably could be) and I get the I might need; but Im trying to convince him the only extra gear he should carry is MY stuff.... He reminds me of a guy I served with in the Gulf. He wanted more grenades, so I gave him two of my frags but told him he had to stay close to me in case I needed one......

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDELWEISS View Post
    Excellent post! Im working reeeeely hard with another officer to get him understand he doesnt need to carry as much gear as a AFV. Hes wearing steel plates because they were cheaper that ceramic (dont ask-at least he has plates....) Now he wants to add pouches all around for gear that he already carries on his duty belt. He wants extra TQs and Izzy bandages and a breaker bar and and and. He not SWAT (probably could be) and I get the I might need; but Im trying to convince him the only extra gear he should carry is MY stuff.... He reminds me of a guy I served with in the Gulf. He wanted more grenades, so I gave him two of my frags but told him he had to stay close to me in case I needed one......
    Molle and rails.... For some reason people just can't stand to have open rows, just makes them want to slap crap on that holds no real value. Weight increases fatigue and reduces speed. I'll pass.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
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    5,508
    Excellent post and it resonates strongly with me.

    Greg's background is CQB; he has deep experience with room clearing. It was a huge opportunity for me to study the subject with Greg since room clearing isn't my forte. My personal and professional background hasn't led me down a path to develop that skill, but it's something that is absolutely vital in the war we're engaged in.

    My background is all geared towards breaking people in a close and personal way. I don't think of this so much as a thinking man's game as it is about animal instinct. (Though for one that isn't blessed with those instincts, you'll have to engage the brain to develop them.)

    You can see how these two skill sets go together like chocolate and peanut butter. And as has been mentioned in other threads, the ability to shift gears is essential...between thinking, planning, applying strategy and ambushing...and raw, instinctual destructive action. There's no time to think about that shifting of gears, it must be immediate, without thought or hesitation. Much skill is necessary to do that.

    A common tendency is the desire to carry too much crap. Yeah, I know it's nice to have things on hand for every eventuality, but I don't care who you are....if you're loaded down with too much crap you can't move well. Light and fast is better whenever possible. (Depends on the mission of course)

    I'm not a door kicker. Unless things go REALLY south, I don't see myself on a team storming buildings. Nonetheless, it's a hugely useful skill to have. But for my purposes I just don't envision having any gear other than my EDC.

    An obvious circumstance is clearing your own home after a bump in the night. This is the only time I can imagine I will have more than my EDC. There's been a lot of discussion lately about appropriate kit for this, and again I see a tendency to overburden ourselves. My kit includes a pair of shoes, a 9mm Beretta Storm, and a small bag with three magazines and an extra flashlight. Even THAT feels like a little overkill to me but...if you have a bag you might as well have more than two mags. I don't even keep my sling on that gun anymore because it just gets in the way for that application (I keep it in the bag, just in case). If I had armor maybe I'd take the time to put it on but really, the scenarios I imagine there would be no time. Indeed, there might not be time to don the bag (which is why I also stage some magazines in a couple other areas of the home). If I felt I had the luxury of extra time I might don armor or electronic ear pro, and night vision if it was necessary (it's really not needed in my home). My point...I want light, fast and mobile. Able to move and fight.

    The other time I envision a proactive home clearing would be when I get home...and in that event I'm likely only going to have my pistol. Maybe I'd take out my Glock PDW...but if I was really THAT concerned I'd call the cops. Other circumstances I see as more reactionary...and like any reactionary situation that involves whatever weapons are at hand (I have more options than I really need at home!)

    Other situations I see that are applicable to all of us in our current hostilities...moving through a contested structure, on our own, either towards or away from the sound of the guns, depending of course on the situational details. That is going to involve an EDC pistol, or at most a PDW if you have it.

    In all the scenarios I envision, the equipment is minimal, not only by design but by necessity. I don't believe in the idea that "civilians don't need this training"; I strongly believe we DO need it. But I also believe in the reality of the circumstances and contexts I'll likely find myself in, and that dictates light, fast, and mobile. STREAMLINED, as Greg describes.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    1,427
    Good post Greg.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Suburb of Des Moines, IA
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    1,002
    Thanks, Greg, this is a great post/article. Could you expand on where you'd recommend placing the secondary weapon? Are you talking chest rig, belt, or somewhere else? If you're talking about the waist, how do you keep it from interfering with the chest rig? Maybe even add a pic or two if it's convenient?
    Suarez International Staff Instructor, Iowa

    "EVERY MAN IS A COUNTER TERRORIST." --Gabe Suarez
    "It's not the will to win that matters--everyone has that. It's the will to prepare to win that matters." --Paul "Bear" Bryant
    "Love of theory is the root of all evil." --William M. Briggs

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tucson via Detroit
    Posts
    567
    How would you handle casualties? Whether on your team, or if solo, evacuating a downed person.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The biggest hindrance to adaptability is ego.

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