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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    4,690
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorkface View Post
    A question about the reduced exposure on corners with an rmr vs irons. The pictures are taken from different angles so it doesnt show it. Is the advantage the fact that you can let the dot float in the glass and still make hits?
    Yes. Once it's sighted in, where the dot goes the shot will follow.
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    7,764
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorkface View Post
    A question about the reduced exposure on corners with an rmr vs irons. The pictures are taken from different angles so it doesnt show it. Is the advantage the fact that you can let the dot float in the glass and still make hits?
    Right. You can float the red dot into the upper outside corner of the optic and the only thing visible is a little but of my right eye and face, the muzzle, and the RDS, without it you expose about twice as much of yourself to get the iron-sight picture.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    7,974
    BTDT. This course material is hands down my fav SI class, without even a round fired.

    All of you in attendance now have joined the ranks of us who have seen Greg's mature side. This course is his wheel house. He will even have moments where intellect will not allow his immature side to sneak in so much as an obvious "that's what she said" because he is too busy talking about doors and angles. It's a sight to see by itself.

    Who was that thick necked garden gnome front and center pushing his arms flat to make his biceps look bigger?
    LIVING > FIRED > JAIL > DEAD
    DISCIPLINA EST LIBERTATEM
    KRG, HRO: Team Tactics 1/2, CRG, HRO: CQB/Team Tactics, Defensive Knife, TMCO


  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Blairsville, GA
    Posts
    397
    Quote Originally Posted by WinstonSmith View Post
    Who was that thick necked garden gnome front and center pushing his arms flat to make his biceps look bigger?
    Yea, I was wondering the same thing. Sounds like a great class and even as an SI instructor, it will be on my short list.
    "The will to win compares little with the will to prepare to win" - Lombardi

    "Evil preaches tolerance until it is dominant, then it tries to silence good" - Archbishop Charles J. Chaput

    "I answer to a higher authority than the approval of men not worthy of my time" - Gabe Suarez


    Train with Rick Klopp
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Bio

    CRG-4: Force on Force Gunfighting - April 8-9, 2017 - Albermarle, NC

    Additional classes including AK Rifle Gunfighting, Force on Force and Advanced Trauma Medicine coming soon.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    170
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nichols View Post
    Right. You can float the red dot into the upper outside corner of the optic and the only thing visible is a little but of my right eye and face, the muzzle, and the RDS, without it you expose about twice as much of yourself to get the iron-sight picture.
    Yes...Asymetric Dot Position or ADP.....The dot doesn't care where it is in the glass, It just makes sure the bullet goes where you want it....
    Kamp
    Suarez International Tier 1 Instructor
    UTM Master Instructor Training Provider and Independent Dealer
    Kamp's Suarez International Training Schedule
    (and no, unfortunately it isn't the summer camp for our kids we all want to send them to)
    Pacific Tactical Website
    Facebook
    Twitter: @pacifictactical

    "Progress comes to those who train and train; reliance on secret techniques will get you nowhere."
    Morihei Ueshiba

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Exiled in Texas
    Posts
    7,349
    I tried to post a few days ago, and the computer ate it. So here it goes again.

    Class was great. We benefited from having both a good crew of students and a good class size. This would be difficult material to teach with too large a class because you'd be falling on top of one another. But it's also not a private lesson, because you need a crew to work with. We also had a good cerebral group.

    The Double Tap facility was awesome. It provided everything we needed for this material. Moving walls, furniture we could beat up on, the ability to go dark, and steel grates for the ceiling/floor between levels one and two (so you could watch the movement of others from above or below). The owners also did a great job of checking up on us to make sure we had everything we needed. I've been away for long enough that I'd almost forgotten what good old southern hospitality is like.

    We didn't fire a single live round for the duration of class. That's hard to sell in a brochure. Shooters want to shoot. Men like us generally aren't happy unless there is some cordite hanging in the air. But this group voted unanimously to keep working dry. We all realized how much we were getting, and knew that we could go ring steel and punch holes in paper from home. We also cut weapon-retention from the plan. While those skills are certainly necessary, I think they fit better in the 0-5 class material. I'm glad we were able to focus solely on CQB and use 100% of our time toward that goal.

    There were two tweaks that I would make (or at least experiment with). First, I would shift the solo room clearing to the end of day two. I think that starting with solo work brought about bad habits that we had to learn to suppress once we started two-man clearing. You really have to break yourself from trying to clear the entire room, and some people were virtually incapable of this. I think that if you started with two men it would be easier to keep people focused on their corner. This may or may not work, but I think it's worth trying. Second, I would add a whiteboard to the mix. Doing it for real is absolutely necessary. You can't learn the footwork from your seat. But diagramming the scene John Madden-style and using different colored markers to show the movement of different individuals would help speed up the understanding of some of the material, and ultimately allow for more time to actually do it live.

    I left with a new appreciation for chem lights and nightlights. I'm adding chem lights in various locations and I'll be tossing them in all my bags. (I'll report back about how they fare when left outside during an Alaska winter.) I've ordered some of those emergency nightlights, that will still have power when the electricity goes out, and I know strategically where I will position them in my house to backlight an intruder. I knew already that I don't like super-bright lights indoors, but I was surprised by how little light is sufficient. I do need to do some live fire work in order to determine how muzzle flash changes this. But chem lights alone provided a surprising amount of detail.

    I ran part of the course with a handheld penlight. The super tacticool Surefire I'm-an-operator lights don't really work for me. But I keep a penlight clipped into a pocket, which can also be used as an impact weapon at the courthouse. So I ran with my real gear. It sucked. It totally destroys your ability to transition from hand to hand. I've worked on developing adequate ambidexterity for gunfighting, but you can't tap into those skills without the right gear.

    My brother, on the other hand, showed up with a new toy: the Surefire XC1 on a G19. That little light absolutely rocks. It's an appropriate amount of light (around 200 lumens); the totally-unnecessary constant-on switch is small enough that you won't inadvertently hit it; the toggles are momentary-only; it uses a standard battery (AA); it isn't very heavy; it doesn't add size in a way that makes it any more difficult to conceal; and it seems reasonably robust. No, it does not have a remote switch. In that regard, it won't be replacing the X300 for the pros. But this product makes a weapon-mounted flashlight a reasonable addition to a CCW pistol. I suspect this is the dawning of a new era. [Gabe, skip selling the lights. Just start making holsters for pistols with the XC1. Right now, the INCOG appears to be the only competition.]

    I added a Streamlight TLR-6 to my G43 recently, and also have a very high opinion of that light. It isn't as robust as the XC1; it can be inadvertently set to constant-on; it has an unnecessary laser; and it's about half as bright (which is still bright enough). [Gabe, more holsters please.] The TLR-6 manages to turn the G43 into a micro-sized operator's pistol.

    One important aspect of this class is developing proper pace. In theory, we know that you can move too fast or too slow. But how fast is too fast? Greg's approach is much faster than anything I had done before. This is not your father's slicing-the-pie. There is no book or video that will adequately communicate this. You just need to take the class. When moving in a train, the guys at the back have to move 4x the speed of the guy in the lead. But that doesn't mean that you can move slow at the front.

    There were still plenty of that's-what-she-said moments. It is Greg, after all. And I definitely won't be bringing my wife along to any of his classes. But you do see a change as he hits his material. I am an advocate of seeking out specific instructors for specific skills. And Greg is an ideal instructor for this skill set.
    Virtute et Armis

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    7,974
    Chem lights and simple back lights - Greg does a good job of showing how simple and valuable those are.

    Did Greg bring doorstop wedges? I ordered a couple on my phone in the middle of the class last year.

    Doing the group work first instead of individual work - I think that's how we did our class, right Greg? I think LawDog brings up a good point about that. I know we definitely talked about entering doors and ran practices one at a time, back to back to back, but I think we first started really running through the shoot house in pairs.

    Seeing (and participating in) a large group that has trained this together for a day or so can be quite the sight to behold. It's a freight train. Don't try to stop it.
    LIVING > FIRED > JAIL > DEAD
    DISCIPLINA EST LIBERTATEM
    KRG, HRO: Team Tactics 1/2, CRG, HRO: CQB/Team Tactics, Defensive Knife, TMCO


  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Exiled in Texas
    Posts
    7,349
    Quote Originally Posted by WinstonSmith View Post
    Did Greg bring doorstop wedges?
    He didn't bring the bag-o-wedges, but he explained their use. The technique of simply closing doors was really enlightening to me. As obvious as it seems now, it had never seemed like an option. But if you close off the threat (even if a door is just visual cover), you can move it down the priority list. That was a significant take-away.

    I also now understand why some guys have a chalk stick in their war bag--for marking rooms as cleared or not. I had seen chalk sticks in photos I have come across of other people's kit, but never understood what it was for. Personally, I'd rather use a bright crayon or magic marker. If the situation is important enough that I'm clearing a house and marking the rooms, I really don't care whether I mess up some paint. I'd rather have a clear and legible mark.
    Virtute et Armis

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    7,764
    Quote Originally Posted by LawDog View Post
    There were two tweaks that I would make (or at least experiment with). First, I would shift the solo room clearing to the end of day two. I think that starting with solo work brought about bad habits that we had to learn to suppress once we started two-man clearing. Second, I would add a whiteboard to the mix. Doing it for real is absolutely necessary. You can't learn the footwork from your seat. But diagramming the scene John Madden-style and using different colored markers to show the movement of different individuals would help speed up the understanding of some of the material, and ultimately allow for more time to actually do it live.

    I did make some adjustments to this class, I added more of the one man stuff where as I mainly addressed it the first time. I don't like it because as you have seen it sucks to try to do it by yourself. I do think "sand tabling" the concepts could add some value to the class and maybe bring visual learners up to speed a little faster and may add that to the next one.

    And I definitely won't be bringing my wife along to any of his classes. that's kinda hurtful bro, I know how and when to be socially acceptable.... ish..But you do see a change as he hits his material. I am an advocate of seeking out specific instructors for specific skills. And Greg is an ideal instructor for this skill set.
    Thanks for the kind words
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    7,764
    Quote Originally Posted by LawDog View Post
    He didn't bring the bag-o-wedges, but he explained their use. The technique of simply closing doors was really enlightening to me. As obvious as it seems now, it had never seemed like an option. But if you close off the threat (even if a door is just visual cover), you can move it down the priority list. That was a significant take-away.

    I also now understand why some guys have a chalk stick in their war bag--for marking rooms as cleared or not. I had seen chalk sticks in photos I have come across of other people's kit, but never understood what it was for. Personally, I'd rather use a bright crayon or magic marker. If the situation is important enough that I'm clearing a house and marking the rooms, I really don't care whether I mess up some paint. I'd rather have a clear and legible mark.
    I was actually considering a cattle marking crayon for this, it's basically a big grease paint (like camo stick) that comes in different colors.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

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