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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,338
    There was a very large element of FOF the other two times I took this course. I wondered how we could reasonably do it without Airsoft but we did and didn't need the Airsoft component.

    Some other thoughts:

    Attendees included a pilot, EMT/fire rescue, M.D., attorney, business manager, author, and such. NOT as some might want to think, just a bunch of kooks who want to play with guns or play soldier.

    The core concepts taught are not just for special police or military teams. They apply in your own home, at Wal-Mart, in your office cubicle, in the parking lot, at the sports stadium, at the shopping mall and could be needed about everywhere. People need this knowledge.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    6,024
    An RMR allows for options even working close that you don't have with iron sights. Reduced exposure is one of them:
    Exposure comparison.jpg
    Greg knows his material and is more than capable of presenting it in a way that is understandable and applicable to the student's situation and circumstances:
    Greg Nichols 1.jpg
    Some interesting ways to knock on a door were presented:
    SAM_0349.jpg
    SAM_0350.jpg
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    6,024
    Moving 1.jpg
    Moving 2.jpg

    The blurring is not intentional and not manipulated into the images. This is an illustration of how fast Greg had us moving on entry. Not only that, he had us moving that quickly pretty quickly and provided an understanding of how to make it work for us. It was not a matter of going fast just because we could or going faster than we should be going. Deliberate speed that varied according to place and position all the time, every time.
    Last edited by CR Williams; 11-03-2015 at 07:58 PM.
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    6,024
    Climbing up 1.jpg
    Stairs aren't the most desirable architectural component to anyone clearing a building but the reality is they will be encountered and we do need to know how to take them.
    Climbing up 2.jpg
    Note the pull-back on the lead man's rifle. We were taught to constantly adjust position of the gun as we approached and moved through and around the building.
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

  5. #15
    Excellent class!

    Greg is a phenomenal instructor and we had a great group of guys to train with. It was clear that Greg was sincere and truly cared about his students, the subject matter and how it was being received (either that or he mastered how to feign sincerity, which would be even more impressive...). I had a preconceived notion of how his class would be based off of the many posts from him and his students and I must say I wasn't disappointed. Tremendous fund of knowledge and a cache of jokes of dubious ethics. I'd definitely NEVER go camping with Greg but I certainly look forward to taking more classes. Lots of info to dissect and apply to my personal situation. Thanks man!

    I want to thank all of the guys at the class. It was great to train with you all and I hope to see you all at future classes.

    CR, thanks for setting this up man. The facility and hosts were great. That MPA set-up of yours is slick. I might have to look closer at that platform

    Lawdog, it was great meeting you and your brother. I've read so many of your posts, I was halfway disappointed that you weren't wearing the same hat as your avatar! That AUG Setup was sick. I see one in my future...

    EricMT you are a monster with your dual wield G34s. I may have to mirror your AR pistol setup

    Thanks to Greg and all of the fellas that took the class. I hope to train with you all again soon.

    Yeah....I wil never look at mayonnaise the same again....

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1
    Way more taken away from this class than I anticipated!

    Like already I told the guys in class, I live in a very secluded rural area. Open hardwoods, thick pines, dense brush, gullies, ridges, and small open fields scattered about. Because of this, CQB has never been a big training interest for me. And all of the CQB training I'd had to date was slow and calculated. Stop, listen, go, stop, slice, slice, slice, slice, go, stop, repeat as needed. Wow, am I glad I had this opportunity to train with Greg Nichols. His approach to these skills is radically different and, in my opinion, so much more effective than any CQB style I'd been taught before. Squeeze, Go, Go, gas-gas-gas, and go do it again and again without stopping. Smooth is speed and speed is life, so don’t rush. This makes perfect sense if you’re doing it right. Greg was also right when he said, "You'll never look at a structure the same way again." Mayonnaise either, but I’m not going there – ever.

    It was a fantastic class with a great group of like-minded guys. We cover so much material and practiced all the possibilities until everyone had experienced just about every aspect of the training first hand. By day three, we had established the team’s pace, unspoken comms, and a level of trust required to do this type of work and do it well. To understand why all these things are important is one thing, but to know what it feels like when it’s done right is something only the experience of doing it can give you. I wish we had more time to add even more layers and challenges to the training so we could have squeezed more knowledge out of Greg. Where I once thought of CQB training as unimportant for my life bubble, or AO, I now feel I want to pursue it. I will be looking for more opportunities to train in the subject matter, to train with Greg Nichols, and/or perhaps both.

    “Thank you” to all the guys in the class. I had a great time and really enjoyed our side talks exchanging ideas and suggestions. I hope to stay in touch with you guys here.
    "Towards An Enemy All Things Are Good, And For My Part, God Forgive Me, If I Could Call Upon The Devils In Hell To Beat Out The Brains Of An Enemy That Would Beat Out Mine, I Would Do So With All My Heart"

    RGF - Rumbaugh
    HRO-6 - Nichols
    HRO-7 - Nichols
    TWOTU since Halloween 2015

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    6,024
    An attorney from Alaska, his brother the pilot, someone that builds the machines that makes aluminum cans (I hope I heard that right), an ER doctor, and EMT, a retired I-can't-remember and one other I-can't-remember and a server administrator. An interesting mix of people to spend three days in a simulated building with and a very fine group of men.
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

  8. #18
    Urban Warfare Weekend AAR:

    I recently completed Greg Nichols’ famous Urban Warfare Weekend, in which we spent three days learning to clear and tactically maneuver through structures by ourselves and as a team. This is material that most training schools only teach to military and LEOs, but that’s not the case with Suarez International. As Gabe says, “You only need a credit card.” I appreciate that, because it’s applicable material for anyone who owns a firearm. Now don’t get me wrong: When you’re on your own, you’re not going to clear a structure if you don’t have to. But if you come home from work to find your front door open and hear your child screaming, you’re not going to drive away and call the police. Or if you’re in the mall with your family during a terrorist attack, you’ll need the skills to get them to safety and then go after the terrorist. This class gives you those skills.

    One thing to know when you take this course: You won’t receive hours of lecturing and diagrams from Greg. He’s not one to talk for long periods of time in front of the class. You’ll start moving through the shoot house very early in the class—which is great for practice and for “teachable moments.” Greg frequently called out mistakes (and successes) from his students and provided pointers about what worked, what didn’t, and how to improve. That’s how most of the learning took place during the class. I realized early on to pay close attention to the other students as they went through the shoot house; I learned just as much from watching them as I did when it was my turn.

    We started the course learning how to take corners and doorways, then we moved on to solo building clearing. Once we got a feel for that, we spent time in pairs, then threes, then fives, and finally all nine of us as a group. Suarez International courses always emphasize ambidexterity with firearms, and this class is where that practice pays off. There are many times when you’re clearing a building that it’s faster and safer to run your firearm in your left hand. I transitioned my rifle from right to left and back again so many times during the class that I forgot I was even doing it.

    One of the many things I took away from this class was that it’s much better to make the wrong decision decisively than to make the correct decision and go about it half-assed. This applies to gunfighting in general, but especially CQB. The biggest advantages you have while clearing a building are speed, aggression and surprise. By acting halfway, you negate these. Also, nothing is going to piss off the number two man in the stack more than you waiting in the doorway trying to decide which way to enter a room.

    A few strong suggestions for future UWW students: Board at the facility with the rest of the class. Go out to meals with everyone. Get the full Nichols experience. We had access to Greg for 16 hours a day during this course; take advantage of that! He’s a treasure trove of information on CQB, and his experience is much more than theoretical. He has extensive experience doing entries on the Special Response Team as an army MP, and he’s been involved in numerous firefights. Soak up the knowledge while you can.

    BTW, everyone make sure to compare Greg in the the CQB videos from last year (here and here) to how he looks now. He’s gotten HUGE!
    Last edited by Eric Tull; 11-08-2015 at 02:09 PM.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nichols View Post
    Shit I may put out a UTM class with a 6&7 or mashup pre-req
    Having a FoF class with 6 and 7 as a pre-req would be awesome. I would definitely take that course.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    6,024
    I've done a FOF component in the Sim House with the lights out. Thinking opposition makes for an interesting experience, sometimes in a Chinese-curse sort of way.
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

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