SI 2014 Training
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  1. #21

    Default FAL Ghost Ring

    I drilled several with .187" bit. I now use cobalt bits since I ran into a hard one.

    Works better at speed in dim light . Not as good as a good optic in dim light.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    548
    I am a total FAL newbie but have decided when I can buy one it is going to be from DSA. One (of many) question I have is what are the pros and cons of metric and inch versions? Which would I be better off with? Second question, can you change a full stock to a para stock?

    Decado

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    262
    Quote Originally Posted by Decado
    I am a total FAL newbie but have decided when I can buy one it is going to be from DSA. One (of many) question I have is what are the pros and cons of metric and inch versions? Which would I be better off with? Second question, can you change a full stock to a para stock?

    Decado
    DSA is currently making metric. DSA rifles are very high quality.
    Metrics are the most widespread. The only real functional difference is that inch pattern magazines won't work in metric rifles. Most parts are actually interchangable between the two.
    British Commonwealth rifles were inch pattern. Israeli rifles used some inch parts. Almost everyone else used the metric pattern.
    Sion ap Rhys

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    368
    Quote Originally Posted by Decado
    I am a total FAL newbie but have decided when I can buy one it is going to be from DSA. One (of many) question I have is what are the pros and cons of metric and inch versions? Which would I be better off with? Second question, can you change a full stock to a para stock?

    Decado
    The best thing I have found about metric is that there are a TON of magazines out there. You can literally get magazines from DSA for $5.00 each.

    I have several and have had no functioning problems with these magazines at all.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    18,059
    Quote Originally Posted by Decado
    I am a total FAL newbie but have decided when I can buy one it is going to be from DSA. One (of many) question I have is what are the pros and cons of metric and inch versions? Which would I be better off with? Second question, can you change a full stock to a para stock?
    DSA has made some inch pattern receivers but no assembled rifles (as of yet).

    Personally I like the "feel" of an inch pattern as opposed to a metric but YMMV.

    To change to a para stock you need to buy a para lower.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    548
    Thank you for the info guys, it is much appreciated.

    Decado

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    262
    Quote Originally Posted by marcclarke


    When I was shopping for my FAL I read some decades-old reports that the S.A. Army had had some difficulties with FAL reliability in the powder-like blowing sand in Namibia and Angola so they adopted the Israeil AK-based Galil. I have read other accounts disputing this. I suspect there is a correct way to lubricate the FAL for desert conditions (probably as little lube as possible, which is what I run here in windy and sandy northern Colorado). I would love to learn more about proper lubrication for worst-case sandy and/or blown-snow condtions, please.
    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthread.php?t=486
    Sion ap Rhys

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Brazil.
    Posts
    17,934
    Quote Originally Posted by marcclarke
    I have never seen a 30-round FAL magazine. Is there even such a thing? If there were, would I want one?
    Yes they exist.
    Would you want one ? - Depends. 1 or 2 wouldn't hurt.
    They were made for the LMG ( heavy barrel,) type FAL which has a bipod fitted.
    Most people would find them too long to use in a prone position. - But if that position is not likely to be adopted, then you get 10 more rounds before a magazine change.
    Of course, if one goes to prone before any shooting has started, you can always change to a 20 rd mag.

    I believe most FAL LMGs were metric.
    The inch FALs used by the British commonwealth were accompanied by the re-barrelled Bren.
    The 30 round Bren magazine will fit an inch FAL, and viz versa. - But beware ! - The Bren mag has a weaker spring than a proper 30 rd FAL mag, because as we all know, it feeds downwards.
    We were warned NOT to use Bren mags on our FALS.
    I am sure that proper 30 rd ( with correct spring tension etc,) mags were made for inch FALs but have never had one issued.
    The Australian SAS made use of 30 rounders on their short barrelled FALs in Vietnam.

    On patrols in South Armagh, when carring an AR, I liked to fit a Sterling 40 round magazine. - It was made of steel, and fitted both an AR15 or AR18.
    But when we stopped to 'lie up' etc, I switched it for a 20 round, to make better use of a low profile whilst in prone.

    Hope this helps.
    Regards,
    Anthony.
    Last edited by Anthony; 03-14-2006 at 12:49 PM.
    If you have to fight, do not fear death.
    We will all die one day, so fight skillfully and bravely!
    And if it is to be that you die, then at least go to God proudly.
    Meet him as the proud warrior that you once were, and not as a sniveling coward.
    Nobody lives forever.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Brazil.
    Posts
    17,934
    With reference the iron sights:
    The British L1A1 FAL came with a folding sight. - It was zeroed for both elevation and windage with a tool, then set.
    It had 5 ranges. - 200, 300, 400, 500 & 600. - It could not be adjusted for windage such as a Garand or M14. - We didn't find that a problem for 'modern battle shooting'. - Long gone were the days of 'company fire' such as in WWI, out to and beyond 1000 yards.
    We set the sights at 300. Anything upto that range, hit close enough to centre.
    We saved the settings at longer ranges for section ( squad ) & troop/platoon fire.

    With Northern Ireland and the need for closer and quicker 'snap shooting' somebody invented something really simple and cheap ( which must have pleased the UK government.;) )
    It was a plastic 'L' shaped sight attachment.
    1) The rear sight was snapped back to '200'.
    2) The rear sight was raised.
    3) The plastic sight cover was pushed down on the rear sight. - It was a friction fit.
    In the upright position, the rear sight peep hole was seen as normal. - The sight could be adjusted as normal.
    But back in the 200 setting, the rear sight could be folded down. Then the shorter horizontal part of the 'L' would arise. This had a huge aperture. - What you guys would call a 'ghost ring' aperture.
    It was really great for closer fast shooting.

    Similar of sorts to the rear sight of a No 4 Lee-Enfield.
    Folded down, there is a 'ghost ring' aperture.
    Folded up, the rear sight ladder offers a smaller ( and more precise,) peep aperture.
    Regards,
    Anthony.
    If you have to fight, do not fear death.
    We will all die one day, so fight skillfully and bravely!
    And if it is to be that you die, then at least go to God proudly.
    Meet him as the proud warrior that you once were, and not as a sniveling coward.
    Nobody lives forever.

  10. #30
    Great post Marc -

    I agree with everything you have said. I did add a free-floating forearm, match grade Shilen HB, adjustable stock, and even micrometer match rifle sights to my FAL when shooting Highpower with it. The adjustable gas system allowed me to shoot everything from 110gr to 190gr bullets, with all sorts of variation in powder charges.

    With all that being said, I no longer have that gun. I felt I was just moving too far away from what a FAL really "is". I now simply have an 18" barrel lightweight FAL carbine, mostly dead stock metric. The only "upgrades" I use are an inch selector, alloy lower and topcover, and one of the windage adjustable A-2 style rear sights. I did add a sand cut inch bolt and carrier (and sand cut the receiver to match) to make the rifle more reliable (I too am an engineer, and can't seem to leave well enough alone:D ) - but as you mentioned, I never had a failure before the sand cuts, and I have yet to have a failure afterward. When hunting season comes around, I put a Leupold 3-9x40 scope on it with a TAPCO mount, and go get a deer.

    But ENOUGH about equipment - this is supposed to be a "Tactics and Techniques" post, isn't it?

    The biggest "FAL technique" that I wish someone would have shown me earlier is hitting the magazine release with the right index finger. This makes magazine changes fast and easy, and even my small hands can reach it easily. I don't understand all the hubbub about swapping magazine catches - the old standard works fine for me.

    Other tactics - hold the rifle on centermass and pull the trigger. That's pretty much all there is to a FAL. The only malfunction drill I've had to do was when a faulty 30 rd (metric) magazine got stuck in my gun once in the middle of a 3-gun match. The follower over-rode the BHO pin, and after hitting the mag catch twice and having nothing happen, I just reared back with my left hand and hit the bottom of the magazine forward hard enough to launch the mag about 20 ft downrange. After that - never a hiccough again.

    What other "tactics or techniques" are different with the FAL than any other rifle?
    "The Way is in training" - Miyamoto Musashi

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