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  1. #1
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    Default Chasing Two Dogs...

    I am getting many questions about training so I will prepare a number of articles to answer most of these questions. Here are a couple.

    1). Can I mix HIIT with strength workouts?
    2). What about the concept of "training for the fight" in regards to distance running?

    I am answering them together as they are the same question..really. And as to the title of the thread? You cannot chase two different dogs at the same time, and expect to catch either one.

    It is tempting to do that, but understand that each workout type has a focus. Think in terms of shooting as fast as humanly possible...as fast as you can slap the trigger...but trying to hit a steel at 100 yards that way. The two are completely in disagreement, and there must be a balance. And for there to be a balance, you must understand what your goal is.

    It is to compete at the World's Strongest Man, or to win the Boston Marathon? Trust me, success will be as scarce as clothing on a French beach. As well, unless you are a candidate for a UFC contract, focusing on "being able to fight" is not the goal either. That last one is a matter of technical expertise and a combination of fitness characteristics. So what is the goal?

    A). Strength. You must have strength and train for it. Based on physical characteristics alone, who is more likely to be able to fight off a couple of muggers best...a 130 pound ultra marathoner, or a 200 pound lean powerlifter? Do we really need to discuss this? As well, I suspect the powerlifter looks better at the beach, has his bones and hormonal balance remaining strong into old age, etc.

    How do we get strong? Easy. We lift heavy things in ways that affect the greatest number of muscles. There are a myriad ways to do this but think Bench Press, Squats, Deadlifts...stuff like that. As a benchmark, you should be ale to bench and squat 1.5 times your bodyweight. Easier on the squat than the bench but we all need goals. You should be able to deadlift 2x your bodyweight.

    You will not do any of these if you just spend an hour on the eliptical, or putting in the miles for your next 10K, or spent an hour on the heavy bag. There should be strength days and there should be days devoted to other things. An interesting byproduct, if your diet is protein-rich and consistent, is that more strength generally means more muscle. And more muscle means less fat.

    B). Agility and Conditioning. These two attributes are the way we get to use our strength. You can be really good at deadlifting 400#, but if you spend no time applying the strength you have developed you are only good at...deadlifting 400#. This is where HIIT, or high intensity interval training comes in. We can also call it the Sprint Concept. I will tell you right here...I Gabe Suarez, do not mix strength days and sprint days on a normal basis. Why not is simple. If I am smoked from 100 yard dashes, I will not do my best on the squats and deadlifts. Conversely, if I have just set a new PR on the deadlift, thinking I am going to pull off a great max effort sprint workout is ridiculous.

    The HIIT/Sprint concept is easy to do, takes less time than a regular workout and is another great way to reduce fat. It also teaches you to move well. You learn several things about body mechanics sprinting up a hill, doing farmer carries, or turkish get ups, as well as from box jumps, and athletic events such as those.

    C). Endurance. Of the three, this is the least one you have to worry about as it will become a byproduct of the other two. A good friend of mine is a long time bicyclist. He began focusing on sprints and lifting a while back. When he attempted a very long arduous ride, he reported no loss in his endurance, even though what he had been focusing on had been anything but endurance focused. Look at the sprinters in the Olympics and then at the marathon runners. Who is more capable of more athletic things?

    If you spend your training time seeking endurance, you will not be strong nor conditioned. But if you seek the first two, with a minor inclusion of endurance periodically, you will in fact have all three. Me? I include a back country ruck march...or a run every couple of weeks, but the focus of my time is spent in Strength and HIIT pursuits.

    Other issues: Diet is an important matter. You cannot out run or out train a crappy diet. I think we have discussed that one at length. Rest is also important. Try for eight hours each night and do not settle for less than 7. Yes, that means you will have to catch The Vikings later on Hulu, but watching Ragnar kill an Englishman will not reduce your belly fat like sleep will.

    So, do NOT train for the fight. Train to be strong agile and explosive. The ability to do what your body and circumstances call for will be improved far more than if you specialized.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
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    100% agree. It took me a while to come around, but I agree.

  3. #3
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    I wanted to start a thread asking how not to get gassed in a fight or while hitting a heavy bag, but my question has been answered. It seems strength and sprint workouts are the way to go.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheJawn View Post
    I wanted to start a thread asking how not to get gassed in a fight or while hitting a heavy bag, but my question has been answered. It seems strength and sprint workouts are the way to go.
    I would say, for people who doubt the efficacy, try an experiment: do a baseline test now. Something like a timed mile run, pullups to failure, a hike with a pack for time, whatever. Three or four things you can measure again consistently.

    Then, for the next 1-3 months, focus on INTENSITY in your workouts. Heavy weights, with just enough rest in between sets to get the next set done. Not poking on the cell phone at the gym or whatever. Pushing yourself on sprint intervals. Intensity.

    Then repeat what you tested as your baseline. Then tell Gabe how much you improved.

    Sent via lightsaber
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    Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

  5. #5
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    When I started training in fighting/ MMA & CQC it was all about training for a fight which usually lasts seconds or minutes. My longest fight training work out was for MMA 30min = 5x5min rounds with 60 seconds in between.

    Most CQC work outs I have done were also 30min/the deck of cards as a base work out but they would stress that most CQC incidents last a very short time span 30sec-3min or something fast a furious. Many drills would be for incidents and only last until the other person obtained the weapon, tagged a vital or tapped out.

    I have always trained for long distance running 5ks, swimming and that is what my body likes. I feel like my fight training is ingrained in my muscle memory and I can jump into it and just get back in the grove easily even though my body is geared for long distance.

  6. #6
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    On fighting. I will say that other thn grabbing some dude by the throat who insisted on coming into our room in Portland during the Junior Olympics, I have not been in a "real fight" in some years. But back in the day, it was a weekly...sometimes daily event. I still have the Internal Affairs documents to back up the statement. Here is the deal.

    1). You do not square off in a real fight like guys do in the cage, ring, mat or whatever. Example: If you are bigger, stronger, younger than me and you square off against me, I will gain the distance I need to and fill your body with every single bullet I have. Its not a case of "My kung fu is stronger", it is a case of I am going to win no matter wtf I have to do.

    2). Real fights are either ambushes (think sucker punches) or successful reaction to ambushes. To pull off an ambush (and that was what I tried to ALWAYS do), all you need is a hard fist and some ass to back it up (or a big flashlight, sap, etc.), and some commitment. Oh yes...good timing as well. Reaction to ambushes require some "covering/distancing" skills and the ability to turn defense into attacks. I pulled that off a few times but the first way is better.

    3). Whenever you can, USE WEAPONS and hit as hard as you possibly can. Think beyond contact weapons such as knives and sticks. Think parked cars, shop windows...gravity...traffic, etc.

    I do not recall a fight EVER going longer than a few seconds, and extended cardio capability was never a factor. But strength was. Explosiveness was. Capacity for violence and suddenness was.

    So think of a real fight like an MMA match that starts unexpe3ctedly and lasts 15 seconds. Going to the ground? I am not saying it won't happen, but what I do know is that the thinking back then was that the "suspect" took you down, you were immediately going deadly force. I may end up with a broken arm, but you bought that with the five 38 special enemas from my J-Frame, or the need for a new lung or kidney that my knife just destroyed.

    In retrospect, the only time a fight went to ground was when the bad guy got footswept and then pummeled for a handcuffing. Things may be different today, but if you ambush the bad guy and KO him with a sap, it won't matter what his skills are.

    So...is winning the fight THAT MUCH of a physical challenge? That is why I do not advocate "training for the fight", but rather training for fitness.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe Suarez View Post
    Going to the ground? I am not saying it won't happen, but what I do know is that the thinking back then was that the "suspect" took you down, you were immediately going deadly force. I may end up with a broken arm, but you bought that with the five 38 special enemas from my J-Frame, or the need for a new lung or kidney that my knife just destroyed.
    I just saw a video of a situation like that:

    http://www.policeone.com/off-duty/ar...-during-brawl/



    Head pounded against ground: bullets flying.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe Suarez View Post
    3). Whenever you can, USE WEAPONS and hit as hard as you possibly can. Think beyond contact weapons such as knives and sticks. Think parked cars, shop windows...gravity...traffic, etc.

    I do not recall a fight EVER going longer than a few seconds, and extended cardio capability was never a factor. But strength was. Explosiveness was. Capacity for violence and suddenness was.

    So think of a real fight like an MMA match that starts unexpe3ctedly and lasts 15 seconds. Going to the ground? I am not saying it won't happen, but what I do know is that the thinking back then was that the "suspect" took you down, you were immediately going deadly force. I may end up with a broken arm, but you bought that with the five 38 special enemas from my J-Frame, or the need for a new lung or kidney that my knife just destroyed.

    In retrospect, the only time a fight went to ground was when the bad guy got footswept and then pummeled for a handcuffing. Things may be different today, but if you ambush the bad guy and KO him with a sap, it won't matter what his skills are.

    So...is winning the fight THAT MUCH of a physical challenge? That is why I do not advocate "training for the fight", but rather training for fitness.

    When I teach patrol officers about traffic contacts, I tell them the contact is out of the car, the contact is ALWAYS on the side closest to the street. When asked why, I tell them, that if it goes to a knock down drag out fight, who do you want getting pushed out into traffic? I promise a car going 40mph hits harder than you ever will.
    NEVER CONFUSE GETTING LUCKY WITH GOOD TACTICS (unless you are at the bar)

    I'm not in the business of Losing

    A stab to the taint beats most of the mystical bullshit, most of the time

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe Suarez View Post
    So...is winning the fight THAT MUCH of a physical challenge? That is why I do not advocate "training for the fight", but rather training for fitness.
    In sport fighting I think condition is huge, you have 2 guys with the same amount of training, the same weight, who gets “gassed” or runs out of fuel first will usually lose.

    Probably not so much in street fighting most street fights are ambushes like you said.

    I have seen people in street fights get gassed and lose.
    I have seen people come in with the initial onslaught that was deflected and absorbed only to be left gassed and to the mercy of the guy they just attacked. I once saw 2 big guys savagely beat it out both got too gassed to finish it, one finally said “I give up” and the other was so winded he just let it be.

    Reminds me of a story I heard once- A group of guys came up to one guy and the leader said “I am going to kick your ass” so the guy ran.. the leader took off from the group and ran after him, after a while the guy could hear the guy chasing him panting and wheezing so he stopped went back and beat his face in. The guy he was chasing runs marathons.

    Use what ever you have - Win any way you can.

  10. #10
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    OK...."street fight", as a prelude to a robbery, or as a sudden response to a perceived slight, or even a racially motivated (lets beat down the white guy) thing - OR - a "mutually agreed upon fist fight" in the back alley of the bar.

    If you got to see them get gassed out, I think it was the latter. I have seen homeboys do that as well, but it was vastly different than the three second shanking. One was inteneded to kill as fast and as effortlessly as possible...the other to demonstrate that one guy was "tougher, had bigger balls, etc." And few educated men that have weapons and common sense will get into such things.

    See item #1.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

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