Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1
    TAIPAN MAGAZINE Guest

    Default Put Your Hands Up - The Fence

    by Suarez International Ambassadors Randy Harris and John McCreery

    In a recent Zero to Five Gunfighting class someone pointed out, that one of the key factors of people having success in the Force on Force drills were people who used the fence or kept their hands up at the start of the encounter. The fence? Split rail or chain link? Nooo, not that fence. The fence that we use is to help mitigate a potential threat. It is a ready position we use for a variety of reasons. What does it look like?



    The fence can be used for multiple things during the beginning of a confrontation. First, it acts as a psychological barrier. Your hands being up say, “hey, there needs to be some space between us.” The fence does this in a non aggressive manner. If a witness sees you in what looks like a somewhat submissive stance, instead of in a defensive position, easier to say that you were not the aggressor. Imagine confronting someone with clenched teeth and closed fists. What do the people around you see vs. the photo above?

    Read the full article at TAIPAN Magazine
    Last edited by Michael Swisher; 07-25-2013 at 02:54 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Benton Harbor, MI
    Posts
    2,477
    Great article guys. Very relevant. I have a question/comment. Some prefer a more compressed type fence. Some of the reasoning behind this being, not wanting to leave the hands extended away from the body where they are easier to grab or cut. Another reason being it may be quicker to go into your default cover from the more compressed fence. Do you see this whole thing along the lines of the drawstroke or see what you need to see, that is a continuum of sorts? Or do you just prefer the original "full extension" fence?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,499
    For what it's worth, my preference is more compressed (dependent on the situation obviously).

    My default fence is essentially no different than if my hands are in fists ready to fight...just open and palms out rather than closed fists with palms more in. Harder for them to grab/control than with an extended fence, and I think it looks less aggressive.

    Of course I tend to WANT people to intrude on my fence so take it for what that's worth. ;)

    Agree it's a great article. Not enough people know about the benefits of this technique. Simple but absolutely necessary.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    North Missouri
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Swisher View Post
    Great article guys. Very relevant. I have a question/comment. Some prefer a more compressed type fence. Some of the reasoning behind this being, not wanting to leave the hands extended away from the body where they are easier to grab or cut. Another reason being it may be quicker to go into your default cover from the more compressed fence. Do you see this whole thing along the lines of the drawstroke or see what you need to see, that is a continuum of sorts? Or do you just prefer the original "full extension" fence?
    I really don't have the experience or knowledge to be one to give advice. But from what I've been told and taught the more you extended your arms out the less control you have. Keep hands 6-8 inches in front of you, you have less distance to move to pick off the incoming punches. Plus the closer you keep your hands to you the more strength you will have.

    I was told when you get your hands out away from you you are swatting flies, not guarding against attack.
    Bill

    Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the American Government take care of him; better take a closer look at the American Indian."
    -Henry Ford

    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. (reinman45)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,427
    Thanks so much for this great article. Now to practice this.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,693
    As always, situation dictates but the fact is you are much stronger arm wise in a more compressed fence than shown in the picture. But for me if you are aggressing me it will be game on before my "fence" is very compressed.

    Manwell

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Benton Harbor, MI
    Posts
    2,477
    Quote Originally Posted by Manwell View Post
    As always, situation dictates but the fact is you are much stronger arm wise in a more compressed fence than shown in the picture. But for me if you are aggressing me it will be game on before my "fence" is very compressed.

    Manwell
    Right, and the man who codified this, as I think they referred to in the article, used it as a type of measuring device. In the bars people get close to hear, but of course as the doorman you have to keep them a certain distance away.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,659
    Extended or close work fine. The hands extended a little further, I've already created more space to allow me a few things. That distance means the persons has to reach further to reach major parts of my body possibly giving me more time to react.

    The hands being more extended allows me also some efficiency of movement to quickly body flash bang/high five the face, again giving me time to move away or in closer to take control. If I only have to move my hand about six inches to drive the head back, that is pretty quick.

    The lead arm being extended would be similar to a stiff arm in football. I'm keeping the person off of me. The other arm being back, would allow me to either reach down to try to access a weapon or cycle with a hammer first with more power.

    Some of the drawback of being more extended is someone using techniques like we teach in 0-5 to pop the arm up and getting behind you.
    www.ohioppt.com
    Twitter @Ohioppt

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    991
    I look at the fence as 3 things. first is the a gauge to set up another strike. Second is a defensive move to block and then counter strike. Third is a non verbal statement. "I will defend myself go pick another guy to fight" Not to mention if you are in public you will be on video.
    Scott Vandiver
    NRA Training Counselor
    Private Security Instructor
    Www.centerfiretraining.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,569
    I like both the extended and the compressed fence because each gives you a LOT of options depending on the situation. Like: if you're in the extended fence and your adversary moves in aggressively it's relatively easy to direct his head to your rapidly-rising knee...

    Situations dictate, but both extended and compressed are great.
    ===========================
    Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •