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Cold War Scout
10-22-2005, 02:13 PM
Anybody got any experience with these? Thoughts??

michael
10-22-2005, 02:19 PM
I haven't used them yet, but the guys at CrossFit like them a lot. Do a search over there and you will find lots of info, and one of the new guys that is posting is a clubbell coach.

Cold War Scout
10-28-2005, 01:22 PM
I have been playing with a couple of 7 lb. substitute Indian clubs for about a week now. While I am not sure they would give you the full body workout that dumbbells and kettlebells do, I will say that I think they would give the user very powerful muscles that would seem to go hand in hand with knifing and stick work.

Clubbells themselves are just too damn expensive.

michael
10-29-2005, 01:28 PM
And that is probably the beauty of them, being able to increase your specific strength for stick and knife work. Seems like I remember one guy using a plastic ball bat, opening it up and filling it with sand for an improvised clubbell.

ShanghaiJay
10-31-2005, 03:00 PM
Invest in Scott's tape and then head over to your local pawn shop and get some sledge hammers. Depending on your height you may need to shorten the handle.

Start with some 8 pounders and then work up to the 15 pounders.

They are cheap and they work great.

Jay

Cold War Scout
11-01-2005, 12:33 PM
Man, you must be in incredible shape. Doing Clubbell type exercises with an 8 pound sledgehammer, and moving up to 15 pounds.
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Weaver Stick Lift

Stick dimensions: 42 inches long. At one end, place a notch 1/2 inch from end. The weight will be placed in notch. Thirty six (36) inches from center of notch, mark a line on stick. This will be the foremost position of the hand. (NOTE: This approximates the dynamics of a 36 sledgehammer). Place some sort of bracket (angle brackets will work )at this point, leaving 5 1/2 inches for the gripping surface. The gripping surface may be taped, for thickness, with non-stick tape.
Place the stick on a surface, even with the lifter's hand when hanging straight down. The stick must be lifted approximately parallel to the floor. The stick must be lifted straight up from the lifting surface, with no rocking of the stick prior to lifting. The lifting hand and arm must remain free of the body, and the heel of the hand must remain on the top of the stick. If the hand twists around the stick, the lift is not allowed. The entire weight must be free of the surface and under control. The lift ends on command.
The lift may also be made by reversing the grip and grasping the stick with the little finger towards the weight, instead of the thumb towards the weight. The body may be bent during this method of lift.


http://www.naturalstrength.com/weightroom/detail.asp?ArticleID=128

John Grimek set the record in the weaver stick lift with 11 pounds with his right hand

ShanghaiJay
11-02-2005, 09:36 PM
It is a faster learning curve then you might think. Start out choked up and gradually work your way down the handle.

Never try to manhandle the sledge. Find the rhythm. Let the swing and the momentum do the work and find the natural coordination for the weight and the length of the tool.

Jay

ShanghaiJay
11-02-2005, 09:41 PM
Man, you must be in incredible shape. :D

In all seroiusness not too shabby for a 45 year old.

But I am much better in some things than others. I can still run a mile in under 6 min. (But that is a far cry from my PR of 4:30.) Anything that is like farm work, i.e. sledges, axes, shovels and pitch forks or hay bales, sand bags, and even concrete block I can hold my own.

Then again, I suck at pull ups.

I worked on a farm for 4 years in my youth. When I started at age 11, I was a pipsqueak and had to learn good whole body technique from the old timers. The damn hay bales weighed almost as much as me. By the time I left there I could hold my own with the best of them.

Jay

AF1
11-03-2005, 10:20 AM
Shanghai, do Scott's Clubbell tapes contain routines that you can follow along with?

Or are they mostly just a collection of all the different exercises, with it being left up to you to piece them together into a routine?

ShanghaiJay
11-03-2005, 03:57 PM
Hi AF1

They are the latter. However, Scott has a great website and forum http://www.circularstrengthmag.com/forum/ that puts great workouts together combining things from Warrior Wellness, Clubbells, Bodyflow and other stuff.

Jay